Home — Essay Samples — Social Issues — Racism — Malcolm X

one px

Essays on Malcolm X

🤔 malcolm x essay topics 📚.

Choosing the right topic for your Malcolm X essay can be a breeze if you follow your interests and consider these aspects:

🗣️ Malcolm X Argumentative Essay

An argumentative essay on Malcolm X involves presenting strong points for or against a particular perspective. Here are ten engaging topics to consider:

  • Malcolm X's impact on the Civil Rights Movement.
  • Was Malcolm X's approach more effective than Martin Luther King Jr.'s?
  • Malcolm X's influence on contemporary black activism.
  • The role of media in shaping Malcolm X's image.
  • Malcolm X's views on self-defense and violence.
  • Malcolm X's criticism of integration.
  • Malcolm X's early life and its impact on his beliefs.
  • The transformation of Malcolm X from a criminal to an advocate.
  • Malcolm X's connection to the Nation of Islam.
  • The legacy of Malcolm X in today's society.

🌍 Malcolm X Cause and Effect Essay

A cause and effect essay on Malcolm X explores the reasons behind his actions and their consequences. Here are ten thought-provoking topics:

  • The causes and effects of Malcolm X's political shift.
  • Malcolm X's childhood and its impact on his adulthood.
  • The consequences of Malcolm X's assassination on the civil rights movement.
  • How Malcolm X's speeches influenced public opinion.
  • The causes and effects of Malcolm X's prison conversion.
  • Malcolm X's impact on African American culture.
  • The consequences of Malcolm X's split from the Nation of Islam.
  • How Malcolm X's family background shaped his ideology.
  • The causes and effects of Malcolm X's international travels.
  • The legacy of Malcolm X and its ongoing impact.

🤷‍♂️ Malcolm X Opinion Essay

An opinion essay on Malcolm X allows you to express your viewpoint on a specific aspect of his life or ideology. Here are ten exciting topics:

  • My personal perspective on Malcolm X's philosophy.
  • Do I agree with Malcolm X's call for self-defense?
  • Malcolm X's relevance in today's racial struggles.
  • Was Malcolm X misunderstood by the media?
  • My take on Malcolm X's radical approach to change.
  • Malcolm X's impact on my understanding of civil rights.
  • Is Malcolm X's legacy still resonant in contemporary activism?
  • My opinion on Malcolm X's criticism of integration.
  • Malcolm X's influence on my own beliefs and values.
  • Do I believe Malcolm X's transformation was genuine?

📖 Malcolm X Informative Essay

An informative essay on Malcolm X is about providing in-depth knowledge and facts. Here are ten informative topics:

  • Malcolm X's early life and upbringing.
  • The evolution of Malcolm X's beliefs over time.
  • Malcolm X's major speeches and their impact.
  • The Nation of Islam and its influence on Malcolm X.
  • Malcolm X's experiences during his time in prison.
  • The key events leading up to Malcolm X's assassination.
  • Malcolm X's international travels and alliances.
  • The role of Malcolm X in the Black Power movement.
  • Malcolm X's literary contributions, including his autobiography.
  • Comparing Malcolm X's and Martin Luther King Jr.'s ideologies.

✍️ Malcolm X Essay Example

📜 malcolm x thesis statement examples.

1. "Malcolm X's journey from a troubled youth to a prominent civil rights leader showcases the power of personal transformation."

2. "The influence of Malcolm X on the Civil Rights Movement was profound, despite his controversial methods."

3. "Malcolm X's advocacy for black self-determination and empowerment left a lasting impact on the struggle for racial equality."

4. "The Nation of Islam played a pivotal role in shaping Malcolm X's beliefs and activism."

5. "Malcolm X's legacy continues to inspire and challenge modern discussions on race and activism."

📝 Malcolm X Essay Introduction Paragraph Examples

1. Malcolm X, a name synonymous with fierce advocacy for civil rights and black empowerment, left an indelible mark on American history. Born as Malcolm Little, his journey from a troubled past to becoming one of the most influential figures in the struggle for racial equality is a remarkable tale of transformation and resilience.

2. In the turbulent era of the Civil Rights Movement, Malcolm X emerged as a powerful voice, advocating for change through unconventional means. His fiery speeches and unapologetic stance against racial injustice challenged the status quo and inspired generations to stand up for their rights.

3. Malcolm X's life story is one of contradictions and complexities. From his early involvement in criminal activities to his transformation into a charismatic civil rights leader, his life is a testament to the capacity for personal growth and change in the face of adversity.

🔚 Malcolm X Essay Conclusion Paragraph Examples

1. In conclusion, Malcolm X's impact on the Civil Rights Movement cannot be overstated. While his methods may have been controversial, his unwavering commitment to the fight for black equality and self-determination has left an enduring legacy that continues to shape the discourse on race and social justice today.

2. As we reflect on the life of Malcolm X, we are reminded that individuals have the power to evolve and effect change. His journey from a troubled past to a symbol of resilience and empowerment serves as an inspiration for all who strive for a more just and equitable society.

3. Malcolm X's story reminds us that true transformation is possible, even in the face of adversity. His legacy challenges us to confront the issues of racial inequality and injustice that persist in our society, and to continue the fight for a better future for all.

Malcolm X and His Influence on The Civil Rights Movement

Literacy behind bars by malcolm x, made-to-order essay as fast as you need it.

Each essay is customized to cater to your unique preferences

+ experts online

Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X in The Civil Rights Movement

Malcolm x: the freedom fighter of black oppression, martin luther king and malcolm x: two civil rights leaders, malcolm x biography, nation of islam, assassination, let us write you an essay from scratch.

  • 450+ experts on 30 subjects ready to help
  • Custom essay delivered in as few as 3 hours

Life and Struggles of Malcolm X – a Combative Civil Rights Activist

Malcolm x and his legacy in fighting for equal rights, breaking down the symbolism in malcolm x’s life, why education is important to our society, get a personalized essay in under 3 hours.

Expert-written essays crafted with your exact needs in mind

Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, and Rosa Parks in The Fight Against Racial Inequality

The theories of protest by socrates, dr. king and malcolm x, the role of martin luther king jr. and malcolm x in civil rights movement, malcome x’s brutality speech vs martin luther king's nonviolence campaign, martin luther king and naacp vs malcom x in the civil rights movement, the influence of malcolm x on ta-nehisi coates, a comparison of malcolm x and julius caesar, analyzing dr. martin luther king and malcolm x vision for equality and freedom from racism in the 1950s and 70s, analysis of connections between the "growing up with poverty and violence: a north lawndale teen’s story" by daleen glanten and "the autobiography of malcolm x" by alex haley, comparison of the ideas of hidden intellectualism and homemade education, malcolm x dbq, malcolm x: a legacy of black empowerment and resistance, malcolm x's speech on police brutality, reflection paper on malcolm x, malcolm x and dr martin luther king jr. perspectives, malcolm x’s "the ballot or the bullet" speech rhetorical criticism, rhetorical brilliance in malcolm x's 'the ballot or the bullet', comparing the philosophies of martin luther king and malcolm x, malcolm x prominence, summary of martin and malcolm america.

May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965

Malcolm X was an African-American Muslim minister and human rights activist who was a prominent figure during the civil rights movement. A spokesman for the Nation of Islam until 1964, he was a vocal advocate for black empowerment and the promotion of Islam within the black community.

Malcolm X was one of the most significant figures within the American Black nationalist movement. Many of the ideas he articulated, like race pride and self-defense, became ideological mainstays of the Black Power movement that emerged in the 1960s and ’70s. He first rose to prominence in the late 1940s, as a member of the Nation of Islam, a religious organization that mixes elements of traditional Islam and Black nationalism. He continued his activism after leaving the Nation.

“You're not to be so blind with patriotism that you can't face reality. Wrong is wrong, no matter who does it or says it.” “Education is our passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to the people who prepare for it today.” “Sometimes you have to pick the gun up to put the Gun down.” “Usually when people are sad, they don't do anything. They just cry over their condition. But when they get angry, they bring about a change.”

1. Tuck, S. (2013). Malcolm X's Visit to Oxford University: US Civil Rights, Black Britain, and the Special Relationship on Race. The American Historical Review, 118(1), 76-103. (https://academic.oup.com/ahr/article/118/1/76/46516) 2. Epps, A. C. (1993). The rhetoric of Malcolm X. Harvard Review, (3), 64-75. (https://www.jstor.org/stable/27559632) 3. Davis, D. W., & Davenport, C. (1997). The political and social relevancy of Malcolm X: The stability of African American political attitudes. The Journal of Politics, 59(2), 550-564. (https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1017/S0022381600053573) 4. Branham, R. J. (1995). “I Was Gone on Debating”: Malcolm x's Prison Debates and Public Confrontations. Argumentation and Advocacy, 31(3), 117-137. (https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00028533.1995.11951606) 5. Harris, F. C. (2015). The next civil rights movement?. Dissent, 62(3), 34-40. (https://muse.jhu.edu/pub/56/article/585788/summary) 6. Jeffries, J. L. (2023). Only the Ques Would Debate Malcolm X: the Civil Rights Movement’s Big Six and the Safe Distance at Which They Kept America’s Foremost Militant. Journal of African American Studies, 1-23. (https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12111-022-09599-x) 7. Street, J. (2008). Malcolm X, Smethwick, and the influence of the African American freedom struggle on British race relations in the 1960s. Journal of Black Studies, 38(6), 932-950. (https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0021934706291192?journalCode=jbsa) 8. Hafez, F. (2017). From Harlem to the “Hoamatlond”: Hip-Hop, Malcolm X, and Muslim Activism in Austria. Journal of Austrian-American History, 1(2), 159-180. (https://scholarlypublishingcollective.org/psup/austrian-american-history/article/1/2/159/201115/From-Harlem-to-the-Hoamatlond-Hip-Hop-Malcolm-X)

Relevant topics

  • I Have a Dream
  • Black Lives Matter
  • Martin Luther King
  • Animal Testing
  • Pro Life (Abortion)
  • Discrimination
  • Women's Rights
  • Civil Disobedience

By clicking “Check Writers’ Offers”, you agree to our terms of service and privacy policy . We’ll occasionally send you promo and account related email

No need to pay just yet!

We use cookies to personalyze your web-site experience. By continuing we’ll assume you board with our cookie policy .

  • Instructions Followed To The Letter
  • Deadlines Met At Every Stage
  • Unique And Plagiarism Free

thesis statement malcolm x

  • Entertainment
  • Environment
  • Information Science and Technology
  • Social Issues

Home Essay Samples Social Issues Malcolm X

"Learning To Read" by Malcolm X: Rhetorical Analysis

"Learning To Read" by Malcolm X: Rhetorical Analysis essay

Analysis of "Learning to Read" by Malcolm X

  • X, M. (1965). The autobiography of Malcolm X. Ballantine Books.
  • Schlesinger, A. M., & Israel, F. (1992). A thousand days: John F. Kennedy in the White House. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
  • Bloom, H. (Ed.). (2009). Malcolm X. Infobase Publishing.
  • D’Souza, D. (2018). The big lie: Exposing the Nazi roots of the American left. Regnery Publishing.
  • Foner, P. S. (2012). The story of American freedom. WW Norton & Company.
  • Haley, A. (1992). The autobiography of Malcolm X: As told to Alex Haley. Ballantine Books.
  • Horne, G. (2011). The counter-revolution of 1776: Slave resistance and the origins of the United States of America. NYU Press.

*minimum deadline

Cite this Essay

To export a reference to this article please select a referencing style below

writer logo

  • Social Problems
  • Twin Towers
  • Islamophobia
  • Pro Life (Abortion)

Related Essays

Need writing help?

You can always rely on us no matter what type of paper you need

*No hidden charges

100% Unique Essays

Absolutely Confidential

Money Back Guarantee

By clicking “Send Essay”, you agree to our Terms of service and Privacy statement. We will occasionally send you account related emails

You can also get a UNIQUE essay on this or any other topic

Thank you! We’ll contact you as soon as possible.

  • Skip to main content
  • Keyboard shortcuts for audio player

Black Power Scholar Illustrates How MLK And Malcolm X Influenced Each Other

Terry Gross square 2017

Terry Gross

thesis statement malcolm x

A man walks past a mural of Malcom X and Martin Luther King Jr. in London. Thabo Jaiyesimi/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

A man walks past a mural of Malcom X and Martin Luther King Jr. in London.

Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X are frequently seen as opposing forces in the struggle for civil rights and against white supremacy; King is often portrayed as a nonviolent insider, while Malcolm X is characterized as a by-any-means-necessary political renegade. But author and Black Power scholar Peniel Joseph says the truth is more nuanced.

"I've always been fascinated by Malcolm X and Dr. King ... and dissatisfied in how they're usually portrayed — both in books and in popular culture," Joseph says.

In his book, The Sword and the Shield: The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., Joseph braids together the lives of the two civil rights leaders. He says that King and Malcolm X had "convergent visions" for Black America — but their strategies for how to reach the goal was informed by their different upbringings.

"Malcolm X is really scarred by racial trauma at a very early age," Joseph says. "King, in contrast, has a very gilded childhood, and he's the son of an upper-middle-class, African-American family, prosperous family that runs one of the most important churches in Black Atlanta."

Joseph says that, over time, each man became the other's "alter ego." Malcolm X, he says, "injects a political radicalism on the national scene that absolutely makes Dr. King and his movement much more palatable to mainstream Americans."

Now, with the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement, Joseph says that King and Malcolm X's visions have converged: "What's really extraordinary is that the Black Lives Matter protesters really are protesting for radical Black dignity and citizenship and see that you need both. So Malcolm and Martin are the revolutionary sides of the same coin, and really the BLM movement has amplified that."

Interview highlights

The Sword and the ShieldThe Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., by Peniel E. Joseph

On what Malcolm X meant by racial separatism

This idea of separatism is really interesting. The deeper I investigated Malcolm X, the more I understood what he meant and what the Nation of Islam meant by racial separatism. It wasn't segregation. It was separatism, they argued, and Malcolm does this in a series of debates against Bayard Rustin , against Jim Farmer , against James Baldwin , Louis Lomax. He says that racial separatism is required because white people do not want Black people to be citizens and have dignity. And if they did, you wouldn't have to protest and experience police violence and police brutality: small children trying to integrate Little Rock High School, young people trying to integrate lunch counters, and they're arrested and brutalized, sometimes people were killed, of course. So what's interesting about this idea of separatism, Malcolm argues separatism is Black people having enough self-love and enough confidence in themselves to organize and build parallel institutions. Because America was so infected with the disease of racism, they could never racially integrate into American democracy.

On Malcolm X's vision of "by any means necessary" protest

Malcolm X's Public Speaking Power

Code Switch

Malcolm x's public speaking power.

Malcolm is making the argument that, one, Black people have the right to self-defense and to defend themselves against police brutality. It's really striking when you follow Malcolm X in the 1950s and '60s, the number of court appearances he's making, whether it's in Buffalo, N.Y., or Los Angeles or Rochester, N.Y., where members of the Nation of Islam have been brutalized [and], at times, killed by police violence. So Malcolm is arguing that, one, Black people have a right to defend themselves. Second part of Malcolm's argument — because he travels to the Middle East by 1959, travels for 25 weeks overseas in 1964 — is that because there [are] anti-colonial revolutions raging across Africa and the Third World in the context of the 1950s and '60s, he makes the argument that the Black revolution in the United States is only going to be a true revolution once Black people start utilizing self-defense to end the racial terror they're experiencing both in the 1950s and '60s, but historically. And one of the reasons Malcolm makes that argument, obviously, is because his father and his family had experienced that racial terror.

On King's policy of non-violent protest v. self defense

One thing that's important to know is that when we think about nonviolence versus self-defense, it's very, very complex, because even though Martin Luther King Jr. is America's apostle and a follower of Gandhi and believes in nonviolence, there are always people around King who are trying to protect him and in demonstrations, who actually are armed, they're not armed in the same way that, say, the Black Panthers would arm themselves later, but they're armed to actually protect and defend peaceful civil rights activists from racial terror. And of course, King famously had had armed guards around him in Montgomery, Ala., after his home was firebombed during the bus boycott of 1955 to '56. And it's Bayard Rustin who famously told him he couldn't have those armed guards if he wanted to live out the practice of nonviolence.

The Power Of Martin Luther King Jr.'s Anger

The Power Of Martin Luther King Jr.'s Anger

So King usually does not have his own people being armed. But when he's in the Deep South, there are civil rights activists who actually are armed and at times protecting him. They're not necessarily connected to his Southern Christian Leadership Conference, but the movement always had people who were trying to protect peaceful demonstrators against racial terror.

On King's response to Malcolm X's argument against non-violent civil disobedience

thesis statement malcolm x

Peniel E. Joseph, Ph.D., is the founding director of the LBJ School's Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at the University of Texas, Austin. Kelvin Ma/Basic Books hide caption

Peniel E. Joseph, Ph.D., is the founding director of the LBJ School's Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at the University of Texas, Austin.

King has several responses: One is that nonviolence is both a moral and political strategy. So the morality and the religious argument is that Black people could not succumb to enemy politics. And this idea that when we think about white racism, we would become as bad as the people who are oppressing us. So he pushes back against that. Politically, he says, well, then there aren't enough Black people, even if they arm themselves to win some kind of armed conflict and struggle. And then finally, he says and there's a great speech in 1963 in Los Angeles where he doesn't mention Malcolm X, but he's speaking out against Malcolm X in terms of what's happening in Birmingham. And Malcolm has called him an Uncle Tom and all kinds of names. He says that non-violence is the weapon of strength. It's the weapon of people who are powerful and courageous and brave and heroic and disciplined. It's not the weapon of the weak, because we're going to use this non-violent strategy to actually transform the United States of America against its own will. ...

I say Malcolm is Black America's prosecuting attorney. He's prosecuting white America for a series of crimes against Black humanity that date back to racial slavery. Dr. King is Black America's defense attorney — but he's very interesting: He defends both sides of the color line. He defends Black people to white people and tells white people that Black people don't want Black supremacy. They don't want reverse racism. They don't want revenge for racial slavery and Jim Crow segregation. They just want to be included in the body politic and have citizenship. But he also defends white people to Black people. He's constantly telling — especially as the movement gets further radicalized — Black people that white people are good people, that white people, we can redeem the souls of the nation. And we have white allies who have fought and struggled and died with us to achieve Black citizenship. So it's very interesting, the roles they both play. But over time, after Malcolm's assassination, one of the biggest ironies and transformations is that King becomes Black America's prosecuting attorney.

On how Malcolm X and King's visions merged

They start to merge, especially in the aftermath of Malcolm's assassination on Feb. 21, 1965. And in a way, when we think about King, right after Malcolm's assassination, King has what he later calls one of those "mountaintop moments." And he always says there are these mountaintop moments, but then you have to go back to the valley. And that mountaintop moment is going to be the Selma to Montgomery march, even though initially, when we think about March 7, 1965 — Bloody Sunday — demonstrators, including the late Congressman John Lewis , are battered by Alabama state troopers, non-violent demonstrators, peaceful demonstrators on the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

'A Proud Walk': 3 Voices On The March From Selma To Montgomery

'A Proud Walk': 3 Voices On The March From Selma To Montgomery

But by March 15, LBJ, the president, is going to say these protesters are right and they are part of a long pantheon of American heroes dating back to the revolution. And then March 21 to the 25, the Selma to Montgomery demonstration is going to attract 30,000 Americans — including white allies, Jewish allies like Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel — to King and the movement. So King is going to make his last, fully nationally televised speech on March 25, 1965, where he talks about American democracy, racial justice, but the long road ahead. By that August, Aug. 6, 1965, the Voting Rights Act has passed. So these are real high points.

But then five days after the Voting Rights Act is passed, Watts, Los Angeles explodes in really the largest civil disturbance in American history up until that point. And when we think about after Watts, that's where King and Malcolm start to converge, because Malcolm had criticized the March on Washington as the "farce on Washington," because he said that King and the movement should have paralyzed Washington, D.C., and forced a reckoning about race in America. And they didn't do that. By 1965, King says that in this essay, "Beyond the Los Angeles Riots," that what he's going to start doing is use non-violent civil disobedience as a peaceful sword that paralyzes cities to produce justice that goes beyond civil rights and voting rights acts.

Sam Briger and Thea Chaloner produced and edited the audio of this interview. Bridget Bentz, Molly Seavy-Nesper and Meghan Sullivan adapted it for the Web.

Penn State University Libraries

Malcolm x: selected resources.

  • Find Articles
  • Encyclopedias and Other Reference Works
  • Bibliography | Biographies
  • Books By and About Malcolm X
  • Microfilm Collections | Selected Websites
  • Selected Articles about Malcolm X

Selected Dissertations about Malcolm X

  • The Contemporary Rhetoric about Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X in the post-Reagan Era Burrow, Cedric Dewayne. Miami University. 2005,
  • Malcolm X and the Nation of Islam: two moments in his religious sojourn DeCaro, Louis Anthony, Jr.. New York University. 1994.
  • Uses of Heroes: Celebration and Criticism in the interpretation of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. Dyson, Michael Eric. Princeton University. 1993,
  • The Rhetorical Strategies and Tactics of Malcolm X Gay, John Franklin. Indiana University. 1985.
  • Malcolm X and the Rhetoric of Transformation: 1948-1965 Lee, Andrew Ann Dinkins. University of Pittsburgh. 1995.
  • Malcolm X and Nelson Mandela: the motivations and attributes of their political leadership Meeks, Daris Deshon. Regent University. 1997.
  • The Transformational Leadership and Educational Philosophic Legacy of Malcolm X Muhammad, Najee Emerson. University of Cincinnati. 1999.
  • The Dual Voices of the Civil Rights Movement: the heroic narratives of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X Owens, Kerry Paul. Louisiana State University and Agricultural & Mechanical College. 1995.
  • The Oratory of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X: a study in linguistic stylistics Rudzka-Ostyn, Brygida Irena. The University of Rochester. 1972.
  • Malcolm X and the Organization of Afro-American Unity: a case study in Afro-American nationalism Sales, William W, Jr.. Columbia University. 1991.
  • Justice Born Through Struggle: Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X (El-Hajj Malik el-Shabazz) and Angela Yvonne Davis Thurston, William Anthony. Emory University. 1994
  • Marcus Garvey and Malcolm X: a comparative analysis of their thought Williams, Anthony C. Florida Atlantic University. 1985.
  • << Previous: Selected Articles about Malcolm X
  • Last Updated: Sep 25, 2023 8:21 AM
  • URL: https://guides.libraries.psu.edu/malcolm-x

Civil Rights

Amaya Archie, Taylor Nolan, Manny Ihezue, and CJ Trahan

thesis statement malcolm x

SUB TOPIC REQUIREMENTS (this is the individual portion of the project)

  • Change the title of the page to the title of your subtopic.  
  • Include a byline – identify the author of the page (you).
  • Include at least three (3) images with citation, more are strongly encouraged
  • You must write at least 500 words in paragraph form about the topic.  Think of this as a 5 paragraph essay, with introduction, thesis statement, supporting paragraphs with evidence from primary and secondary sources, and a conclusion which relates back to the thesis.
  • The primary sources should be easily accessible.  Provide hyperlink(s) to your primary source(s) so readers can easily access on their own.  Don’t forget to include information from this source in the body of your written content.
  • You must provide citation of all source material used within the body of your text, following the Notes and Bibliography style.  Refer to the following Guide to in-text notes

Sub-Topic Format Guidelines

  • Introduction (1-2 paragraphs)
  • Provide a brief summary of what you plan to discuss in your project. Introduce your topic to your classmates and describe general information.  This is generally a paragraph or two, no more, ending with a thesis statement or the basic argument of your paper.
  • Body (3+ paragraphs)
  • Establish context – when and where?
  • Significant individuals or groups involved and who they were/why they were significant (biographical information)
  • What problems needed to be solved/what were their goals?
  • What actions did they take?
  • What were the outcomes?
  • Identify the author/creator and provide short biography
  • Why was it written or created and for what audience?
  • Describe the content of the primary source
  • What does it tell you about specific ideas or events?
  • How does it connect to the overall topic?
  • Conclusion (1-2 paragraphs)
  • What impact did they have at the time? Lasting impacts?
  • Why is this topic significant today?

You must cite any sources used in creating your website.  Within the body of your text, provide citation following the Notes and Bibliography style.  Each footnote should appear at the bottom of the page that includes its numbered in-text reference.  Refer to the following Guide to in-text notes.

  • You can also refer to the Turabian Quick Guide for citation guidelines: http://www.press.uchicago.edu/books/turabian/turabian_citationguide.htm
  • Here is a helpful link on the ODU Perry Library website: http://guides.lib.odu.edu/cite

Martin Luther King and Malcolm X Essay

Martin Luther King Junior and Malcolm X were key figures who went down in history of the United States due to their unprecedented efforts in fighting for civil rights and elimination of racism in America. Each of them had a different method and view of struggling against the social injustices against the blacks. Martin Luther King was a Christian, while Malcolm X was a Muslim, that is why their views were based on their religious backgrounds, and the way they had been brought up by their parents.

Martin Luther King originated from a bourgeois class family, thus he was an educated person, while Malcolm X had been brought up from a humble background, which made him drop out of school and engage in drugs. Martin Luther King Jr. had a peaceful approach towards fighting against social injustices as he believed that they could be eradicated through a dialogue. On the contrary, Malcolm X had a different view, which could be traced back to his upbringing.

He acquired a bitter attitude towards the whites who he believed were the source of his problems. While Martin Luther King insisted on nonviolent resistance or integrationist philosophy, Malcolm X had a strong believe in nationalist and separatist doctrines. Their philosophies resulted in forming contrasting views in the people’s minds in terms of sensibility. Martin Luther King’s philosophy of nonviolence appealed to Americans of the 1960’s the most.

Martin Luther King’s philosophy of handling the social injustices was aimed at bringing together blacks and whites as a union. This doctrine had six underlying principles, which guided it. One of them stated that nonviolent protestors should not discredit the opponents but instead look for their understanding and friendship.

He had a strong believe that the only way to overcome a devil was by befriending him. Fighting, according to his view, could not solve the problem but would intensify hatred between the two parties. Violence might murder the murderer, but it would not murder the murder itself; it could kill the liar, but it would not eliminate lie, and violence may murder the dishonest person, but not dishonesty (King, “I Have a Dream Speech”).

Violence will never be a way out as it will only intensify the problem. Malcolm X believed in the doctrine of separation as a solution to social injustices. In his speech, he said that by working separately, the sincere white people and sincere black people would actually be working together. He proclaimed, “Let the sincere whites go and teach nonviolence to white people” (Malcolm X “The Homecoming Rally of the OAAU”).

He further put more emphasis on the doctrine of separation by saying that when money was taken out of the neighborhood in which one lived, the neighborhood in which a person invested his/her money became wealthier and wealthier (Malcolm X “The Homecoming Rally of the OAAU”).

Therefore, in order for the blacks to control their economy, money should be spent within the neighborhood. Furthermore, according to Malcolm X, dialogue was not the solution to the injustices because the enemy would not hear what you were saying.

He said that, ‘You know you can’t communicate if one man is speaking French and the other is speaking German, his language is brutality’ (Malcolm X “The Homecoming Rally of the OAAU”). He even advocated for different institutions for the Afro-Americans (Malcolm X “The Homecoming Rally of the OAAU”). He saw the only way to know the enemy’s language was by studying his history.

Philosophy of nonviolence advocated by Martin Luther King Junior relied on another principle stating that nonviolent resistance was disposition to undertake suffering without revenging. He believed that one day he would see blacks and whites together. “Let us march on segregated schools until every vestige of segregation and inferior education becomes a thing of the past and Negroes and whites study side by side in the socially healing of the classroom” (King, “ Our God is Marching On”).

In his speech “I Have a Dream” he said that, “I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by their character’ (King). He also had a strong faith in achievement of freedom without violence.

Although Malcolm X did not favor violence, he had a strong objection on the subject of nonviolence philosophy on the blacks. In his “Interview with Young Socialist Alliance Leaders”, he said that, “nonviolence is only preached to black Americans and I don’t go along with anyone who wants to teach our people nonviolence until someone at the same time is teaching our enemy to be nonviolent” (Malcolm). According to him, this could only work if it was done by both parties.

The philosophy of nonviolence by Martin Luther King Junior was the most sensible for this case. His method of addressing social problems was not biased. He looked at both sides equally, and he knew that even if they resorted to violence, the blacks would be outnumbered by the whites. ”

The Negro would face the same unchanged conditions, the same squalor and deprivation – the only difference being that bitterness would be more intense” (King “ Our God is Marching On”). In comparison to Malcolm’s separatist philosophy, the King’s one would be most effective because it advocated for bringing the warring parties together.

Malcolm X presented his arguments in favor of the Negros (Malcolm X “Twenty Million Black People in Political, Economic and Mental Prison”). As a result, the gap between them became even wider. Martin Luther King produced an impression that he was peaceful and idealistic while most of his speeches encouraged the spirit of togetherness between blacks and whites.

Works Cited

King, Martin Luther. “ I Have a Dream Speech “, the Lincoln Memorial, Washington D.C. 28 Aug. 1963. Web.

King, Martin Luther . “ Our God is Marching On .” Montgomery, Alabama. 21 Mar. 1965. Web.

Malcolm X. “Interview with Young Socialist Alliance Leaders.” 18 Jan. 1965. Web.

Malcolm X. “The Homecoming Rally of the OAAU.” New York. 29 Nov. 1964. Keynote Address.

Malcolm X. “Twenty Million Black People in Political, Economic and Mental Prison.” Michigan State University, 23 Jan. 1963. Keynote Speech.

  • Chicago (A-D)
  • Chicago (N-B)

IvyPanda. (2021, August 6). Martin Luther King and Malcolm X. https://ivypanda.com/essays/martin-luther-king-and-malcolm-x/

"Martin Luther King and Malcolm X." IvyPanda , 6 Aug. 2021, ivypanda.com/essays/martin-luther-king-and-malcolm-x/.

IvyPanda . (2021) 'Martin Luther King and Malcolm X'. 6 August.

IvyPanda . 2021. "Martin Luther King and Malcolm X." August 6, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/martin-luther-king-and-malcolm-x/.

1. IvyPanda . "Martin Luther King and Malcolm X." August 6, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/martin-luther-king-and-malcolm-x/.

Bibliography

IvyPanda . "Martin Luther King and Malcolm X." August 6, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/martin-luther-king-and-malcolm-x/.

  • Separatist Movements' Impacts
  • Martin Luther King and Malcolm X: Who Is Closer to Success?
  • Non-Violence Approach to Conflicts
  • The Sixties: Malcolm X's Speech
  • Muslim Separatist Group of Southern Philippines
  • Martin Luther King Jr.’s and Malcolm X’s Leadership Styles
  • The Civil Rights Movement: Martin King and Malcolm X's Views
  • Socio-Religious Philosophies of Malcolm X and King
  • Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Comparison
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X
  • Ideas of W.E.B. Dubois and Booker T. Washington
  • The Black Arts Era: Contributions of Malcolm X & Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Key Differences Between Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Dubois Essay
  • Political Theories of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Influence of the American Media in Promotion of Democratic Values in the United States of America

IMAGES

  1. Final Outline- Malcolm X Prompt

    thesis statement malcolm x

  2. 🎉 Malcolm x thesis paper. Malcolm X Thesis Statement. 2022-10-31

    thesis statement malcolm x

  3. Thesis statement of malcolm x denzel

    thesis statement malcolm x

  4. Malcolm X Essay

    thesis statement malcolm x

  5. Malcolm X Essay

    thesis statement malcolm x

  6. 25 Thesis Statement Examples (2024)

    thesis statement malcolm x

VIDEO

  1. How to Start your Writing

  2. The StartUp Problem Statement is the entire thesis that validates your startup’s right to exist

  3. How to Write a THESIS Statement

  4. MALCOLM X Jaw-Dropping Facts! TOP-11

  5. 10 Simple Strategies for Successful Dissertation Writing || WritersER

  6. Malcolm X Last Interview

COMMENTS

  1. Malcolm X Essays

    📜 Malcolm X Thesis Statement Examples. 1. "Malcolm X's journey from a troubled youth to a prominent civil rights leader showcases the power of personal transformation." 2. "The influence of Malcolm X on the Civil Rights Movement was profound, despite his controversial methods." 3. "Malcolm X's advocacy for black self-determination and ...

  2. Thesis Statement On Malcolm X

    Thesis Statement On Malcolm X. 717 Words3 Pages. Introduction: Malcom X urges the Negro community to fight to gain the equal rights they deserve by taking action against their white oppressors. He emphasizes that blacks will gain their rights either thorough voting, with the ballot, or else through the inevitable violence with the bullet.

  3. What is the thesis statement for Malcolm X's "Prison Studies?"

    The introduction of Malcolm X's essay contains two sentences, neither which offer a solid thesis statement. In fact, the essay does not seem to offer one singular thesis at all. Instead, the essay ...

  4. The Autobiography of Malcolm X Critical Essays

    I. Thesis Statement: Malcolm was only eight-years-old when his father was brutally murdered. Throughout his life, he was looking for a father-figure to make up for his earlier, tragic loss. II ...

  5. Malcolm X's "Ballot or Bullet" Speech: An Analysis Essay

    On 12 April 1964, Malcolm X delivered his famous "Ballot or Bullet" speech to inspire Black Nationalism and urge African Americans to fight for their rights. This essay analyses the many instances of rhetorical devices used by Malcolm X in his speech. Malcolm opens his speech with a dramatic flourish when he states that "This afternoon we ...

  6. Malcolm X

    A good thesis would not be "Malcolm X learned to read in prison," as that is a fact, not a debatable question. A thesis statement that is an opinion, but not a very interesting one, is that ...

  7. PDF An Examination of

    Thesis Statement: To explore Malcolm X's economic proscription for African Americans through his public statements and writings Introduction Over the course of many centuries Africans have attempted to assert their humanity often facing inhumane circumstances manifest in the social conditions of slavery and racial

  8. 115 Malcolm X Essay Topic Ideas & Examples

    The Sixties: Malcolm X's Speech. Black Nationalism, Religion, African-American integration, Violence/non-violence are some of the main issues that Malcolm X addressed in his speech in regards to the Civil Rights movement and the larger American society. "The Ballot or the Bullet" the Speech by Malcolm X.

  9. Malcolm X: The Idea of Black Supremacy Thesis

    The general ideas and thoughts of Malcolm X were signifying their dissatisfactions and complaints. He was considered to be the most influential man of the Islam Nation after Elijah Muhammad (Grewal, 2015). Nevertheless, many people of both Caucasian and Negroid races were confused with Malcolm X's statements during that period.

  10. Thesis Statement Of Malcolm X

    Thesis Statement Of Malcolm X. 884 Words4 Pages. Malcolm X is born as Malcolm Little in Omaha, Nebraska. The Midwest, during this period, is full of discrimination and racial violence. Malcolm's family moves to Michigan where they continue to experience persecution and violence. White people murder Malcolm's father and force his mother into ...

  11. Thesis Of Malcolm X

    Thesis Statement On Malcolm X 717 Words | 3 Pages. Introduction: Malcom X urges the Negro community to fight to gain the equal rights they deserve by taking action against their white oppressors. He emphasizes that blacks will gain their rights either thorough voting, with the ballot, or else through the inevitable violence with the bullet.

  12. How do you start a literary analysis of Malcolm X's "Literacy Behind

    The steps to conducting a literary analysis are as follows: 1. Read the text. 2. Identify which elements "speak to you" (what you would like to focus upon). 3. Identify how the "parts" of this ...

  13. PDF Comparison and Contrast Outline: Martin Luther King and Malcolm X

    Comparison and Contrast Outline: Martin Luther King and Malcolm X . THESIS: In their effort to improve the lives of African Americans, MLK and Malcolm X employ the rhetoric of innate human rights and shame in their texts, while putting forth competing visions of the . American Narrative.

  14. "Learning To Read" by Malcolm X: Rhetorical Analysis

    Get Custom Essay. Written by Alex Haley, "Learning to Read" is an excerpt from "The Autobiography of Malcolm X". It's based on interviews Malcolm X did before he was assassinated, and is a commentary on Malcolm's path to edification while he was imprisoned. The author uses a variety of rhetorical strategies, such as pathos ethos and ...

  15. Black Power Scholar Illustrates How MLK And Malcolm X Influenced ...

    On King's response to Malcolm X's argument against non-violent civil disobedience. Enlarge this image. Peniel E. Joseph, Ph.D., is the founding director of the LBJ School's Center for the Study of ...

  16. Malcolm X Thesis

    Malcolm X Thesis. 974 Words4 Pages. Throughout the time of history, African Americans have faced unmeasurable hardships, discrimination, and racism that still affect American society today. The 1900s was a time period of reform and allowed for change that improved the life of minorities. McKay was an author who resorted to poetry as a form of ...

  17. Malcolm X: Selected Resources

    Selected Articles about Malcolm X; Selected Dissertations about Malcolm X; Selected Dissertations about Malcolm X. The Contemporary Rhetoric about Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X in the post-Reagan Era. Burrow, Cedric Dewayne. Miami University. 2005, ... Legal Statements ...

  18. Malcolm X

    Malcolm X Speaks: Selected Speeches and Statements (speeches) 1965 Malcolm X on Afro-American History (speeches) 1967 ... thesis, development, synthesis and summary. ...

  19. Malcolm X

    Introduction. The paper will argue that the film "Malcolm X" is a fight against the demonization of an African American icon. In light of critics' remarks in the book "The mistakes of Malcolm X", the director went beyond propaganda and told the story of a society changer. It will argue that the prison scene in the movie was designed ...

  20. Malcolm X

    Malcolm X. SUB TOPIC REQUIREMENTS (this is the individual portion of the project) ... Think of this as a 5 paragraph essay, with introduction, thesis statement, supporting paragraphs with evidence from primary and secondary sources, and a conclusion which relates back to the thesis.

  21. Malcolm X: By Any Means Necessary Critical Essays

    In his preface to Malcolm X: By Any Means Necessary, Myers identifies Malcolm X as the pivotal figure of the Civil Rights movement of the 1960's. His contributions to African American thought ...

  22. Final Outline- Malcolm X Prompt

    Malcolm X Essay Outline. I. Introduction: Thesis statement: Malcolm's use of different literary devices such as imagery, similes, and metaphors add to the vividness and detail of the text. II. Body Paragraphs: I. Imagery: Malcolm's use of imagery throughout the text adds to the vividness and detail of the text in the sense that his clear descriptions of the events that are going on around ...

  23. Martin Luther King and Malcolm X

    While Martin Luther King insisted on nonviolent resistance or integrationist philosophy, Malcolm X had a strong believe in nationalist and separatist doctrines. Their philosophies resulted in forming contrasting views in the people's minds in terms of sensibility. Martin Luther King's philosophy of nonviolence appealed to Americans of the ...