134 Economics Thesis Topics: Ideas for Outstanding Writing

master thesis development economics

Writing a thesis is not an easy task. For most of the students, it can be even intimidating, especially when you do not know where to start your research.

Here, we have provided an economics thesis topics list. After all, everyone knows that choosing the right idea is crucial when writing an academic paper. In economics, it can combine history, math, social studies, politics, and numerous other subjects. You should also have solid foundations and a sound factual basis for a thesis. Without these elements, you won’t be able to master your research paper.

The issue is:

It is not always clear what could be seen as an excellent economics thesis topic. Our experts can assist you with this challenge. This list contains some outstanding examples to get you started.

  • ⭐ Thesis in Economics
  • đŸ”„ Supreme Thesis Topics
  • 👍 Bachelor’s Thesis
  • đŸ˜Č Master’s Thesis

📊 Microeconomics

📈 macroeconomics.

  • đŸ€” Developmental
  • đŸ‘šâ€đŸ’Œ Behavioral
  • đŸ’Œ Financial
  • đŸŒ± Agricultural
  • đŸ€â€ Sociology
  • 📚 Ph.D. Topics
  • 📝 How to Pick a Topic

⭐ What Does a Thesis in Economics Look Like?

A good thesis in economics is a blend between an empirical paper and a theoretical one. One of the essential steps in choosing a topic in economics is to decide which one you will write.

You may write, research, analyze statistical data and other information. Or build and study a specific economic model.

Or why not both!

Here are some questions you can ask when deciding what topic to choose:

  • What has already been written on this topic?
  • What economic variables will my paper study?
  • Where should I look for the data?
  • What econometrics techniques should I use?
  • What type of model will I study?

The best way to understand what type of research you have to do is to write a thesis proposal. You will most probably be required to submit it anyway. Your thesis supervisor will examine your ideas, methods, list of secondary and primary sources. At some universities, the proposal will be graded.

Master’s thesis and Bachelor’s thesis have three main differences.

After you get the initial feedback, you will have a clear idea of what to adjust before writing your thesis. Only then, you’ll be able to start.

đŸ”„ Supreme Economics Thesis Topics List

  • Fast fashion in India.
  • The UK housing prices.
  • Brexit and European trade.
  • Behavioral economics.
  • Healthcare macroeconomics.
  • COVID-19’s economic impact.
  • Global gender wage gap.
  • Commodity dependence in Africa.
  • International trade – developing countries.
  • Climate change and business development.

👍 Economics Bachelor’s Thesis Topics

At the U.S. Universities, an undergraduate thesis is very uncommon. However, it depends on the Department Policy.

The biggest challenge with the Bachelor’s Thesis in economics concerns its originality. Even though you are not required to conduct entirely unique research, you have to lack redundant ideas.

You can easily avoid making this mistake by simply choosing one of these topics. Also, consider visiting IvyPanda essays database. It’s a perfect palce to conduct a brainstorming session and come up with fresh ideas for a paper, as well as get tons of inspiration.

  • The impact of the oil industry on the economic development of Nigeria. The oil industry is vital for the economic development of Nigeria. In this thesis, students can discuss the notion of the resource curse. Analyze the reasons why general people are not benefiting from the oil industry. Why did it produce very little change in the social and economic growth of the country?
  • Sports Marketing and Advertising: the impact it has on the consumers.
  • Economic opportunities and challenges of investing in Kenya .
  • Economic Development in the Tourism Industry in Africa. Since the early 1990s, tourism significantly contributed to the economic growth of African countries. In this thesis, students can talk about the characteristics of the tourist sector in Africa. Or elaborate on specific countries and how their national development plans look like.
  • Globalization and its significance to business worldwide .
  • Economic risks connected to investing in Turkey .
  • The decline in employment rates as the biggest American economy challenge .
  • The economics of alcohol abuse problems. In this thesis, students can develop several essential issues. First, they can examine how poverty is connected to alcohol abuse. Second, they can see the link between alcohol consumption and productivity. To sum up, students can elaborate on the economic costs of alcohol abuse.
  • Causes and solutions for unemployment in Great Britain.
  • Parallel perspective on Global Economic Order: China and America. This thesis can bring a comparative analysis of the economies to a new level. China and The US are the world’s two largest economies. These two countries have a significant impact on the global economic order. So, looking at the set of institutions, policies, rules can be constructive.
  • The new international economic order after COVID-19
  • Financial stability of the banking sector in China.
  • New Electronic Payment Services in Russia.
  • The influence of culture on different entrepreneurial behaviors.
  • The impact of natural cultural practices on entrepreneurial activity.
  • The relationships between national culture and individual behavior.
  • The main reasons for salary inequalities in different parts of the U.S.

đŸ˜Č Economics Master’s Thesis Topics

Student life can be fascinating, but it comes with its challenges. One of which is selecting your Master’s thesis topic.

Here is a list of topics for a Master’s thesis in economics. Are you pursuing MPhil in Economics and writing a thesis? Use the following ideas as an inspiration for that. They can also be helpful if you are working on a Master’s thesis in financial economics.

  • The impact of visual aid in teaching home economics.
  • The effect of income changes in consumer behaviors in America.
  • Forces behind socio-economic inequalities in the United States. This thesis can explore three critical factors for socio-economic differences in the United States. In the past 30 years, social disparities increased in the United States. Some of the main reasons are technology, trade, and institutions.
  • The relationships between economic growth and international development.
  • Technological innovations and their influence on green and environmental products.
  • The economics of non-solar renewable energy .

Renewable energy is beneficial for various economic reasons.

  • The economic consequences of terrorism . Terrorism not only takes away lives and destroys property but also widely affects the economy. It creates uncertainty in the market, increases insurance claims, slows down investment projects, and tourism. This thesis can address all of the ways in which terrorism can affect economies.
  • Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) implementation in the Oil and Gas Industry in Africa.
  • Use of incentives in behavioral economics.
  • Economic opportunities and challenges of sustainable communities .
  • Economics of nuclear power plants.
  • Aid and financial help for emerging markets. This topic is very versatile. Students can look at both the positive and the adverse effects that funding has on the development. There are plenty of excellent examples. Besides, some theories call international help a form of neocolonialism.
  • Multinational firms impact on economic growth in America .
  • The effect of natural disasters on economic development in Asia.
  • The influence of globalization on emerging markets and economic development.

📑 More Economics Thesis Topics: Theme

For some students, it makes more sense to center their search around a certain subject. Sometimes you have an econ area that interests you. You may have an idea about what you want to write, but you did not decide what it will be.

If that’s the case with you, then these economics thesis topics ideas are for you.

  • An analysis of the energy market in Russia.
  • The impact of game theory on economic development.
  • The connection between minimum wage and market equilibrium.
  • Gender differences in the labor market in the United States. This topic can shed light on gender differences in the labor market in the United States. In the past years, the overall inequality in labor in the markets decreased. However, there is still a lot of work that can be done.
  • Economic reasons that influence the prices of oil .
  • Relationship between the Lorenz curve and the Gini coefficient.
  • Challenges of small businesses in the market economy.
  • The changes in oil prices: causes and solutions . Universal economic principles do not always apply to the sale and purchase of the oil. The same happens with its cost. In the thesis, talk about what affects the prices. What are the solutions that can be implemented?
  • The economic analysis of the impact of immigration on the American economy.

Immigration has a little long-run effect on Americans’ wages.

  • Economic inequality as a result of globalization . Economic inequality becomes even more apparent on the global level. There is a common belief that globalization is the cause of that. Discuss what can be the solutions to these problems. This topic is vital to minimize the gap between the rich and the poor.
  • The economic explanation of political dishonesty .
  • Effect of Increasing Interest rates costs in Africa .
  • The connection between game theory and microeconomics.
  • Marketing uses in microeconomics.
  • Financial liability in human-made environmental disasters.
  • Banks and their role in the economy. Banks are crucial elements of any economy, and this topic covers why. You can explain how banks allow the goods and services to be exchanged. Talk about why banks are so essential for economic growth and stability.
  • Inflation in the US and ways to reduce its impact.
  • The connection between politics and economics.
  • Income Dynamics and demographic economics.
  • US Market Liquidity and macroeconomics.
  • Macroeconomics and self-correction of the economy .
  • The American economy, monetary policy, and monopolies .
  • The importance of control in macroeconomics. One of the central topics in macroeconomics is grouped around the issue of control. It is quite reasonable that control over money and resources should become a topic of discussion.
  • Analysis of Africa’s macroeconomics and its performance.
  • Economics of education in developing markets.
  • Problems and possible solutions for Japan macroeconomics .
  • Comparative analysis of British macroeconomics concerning the US .
  • Public policies and socio-economic disparities.
  • The world problems through macroeconomic analysis. Indeed, macroeconomics is very complicated. There are many influences, details, and intricacies in it. However, it allows economists to use this complex set of tools to examine the world’s leading problems today.

There are four main problems in macroeconomics.

  • The connection between employment interest and money.

đŸ€” Development Economics

  • Economics of development . This topic is very rich in content. First, explain what it is. Then pay particular attention to domestic and international policies that affect development, income distribution, and economic growth.
  • The relation between development and incentive for migration.
  • The impact of natural disasters on the economy and political stability of emerging markets.
  • The economic consequences of population growth in developing countries.
  • The role of industrialization in developing countries . The industrialization has been connected with the development. It promotes capital formation and catalyzes economic growth in emerging markets. In this thesis, you can talk about this correlation.
  • Latin American economic development.
  • Gender inequality and socio-economic development .
  • Problems of tax and taxation in connection with economic growth.
  • The economic impact of terrorism on developing markets.
  • Religious decline as a key to economic development. Not everyone knows, but a lot of research has been done in the past years on the topic. It argues that decreased religious activity is connected with increased economic growth. This topic is quite controversial. Students who decide to write about it should be extra careful and polite.

đŸ‘šâ€đŸ’Œ Behavioral Economics

  • Risk Preferences in Rural South Africa.
  • Behavioral Economics and Finance .
  • Applied behavioral economics in marketing strategies. If you want to focus your attention on marketing, this topic is for you. Behavioral economics provides a peculiar lens to look at marketing strategies. It allows marketers to identify common behaviors and adapt their marketing strategies.
  • The impact of behavioral finance on investment decisions.
  • Behavioral Economics in Child Nutrition Programs in North Texas.
  • Guidelines for Behavioral Economics in Healthcare Sector.
  • Cognitive and behavioral theories in economics .
  • Cross-cultural consumer behavior and marketing communication. Consumers are not only affected by personal characteristics, but also by the culture they are living in. This topic focuses on the extent it should determine marketing strategy and communication.
  • Behavior implications of wealth and inequality.

The richest population holds a huge portion of the national income.

  • Optimism and pessimism for future behavior.

đŸ’Œ Financial Economics

  • Financial Economics for Infrastructure and Fiscal Policy .
  • The use of the economic concept of human capital. Students can focus on the dichotomy between human and nonhuman capital. Many economists believe that human capital is the most crucial of all. Some approach this issue differently. Therefore, students should do their research and find where they stand on this issue.
  • The analysis of the global financial crisis of 2020s. Share your thoughts, predictions, ideas. Analyze the economic situation that affects almost everyone in the world. This thesis topic will be fresh and original. It can help to start a good and fruitful conversation.
  • The big data economic challenges for Volvo car.
  • The connection between finance, economics, and accounting.
  • Financial economics: Banks competition in the UK .
  • Risk-Taking by mutual funds as a response to incentives.
  • Managerial economics and financial accounting as a basis for business decisions.
  • Stock market overreaction.

đŸŒ± Agricultural Economics

  • Agricultural economics and agribusiness.
  • The vulnerability of agricultural business in African countries.
  • Agricultural economics and environmental considerations of biofuels .
  • Farmer’s contribution to agricultural social capital.
  • Agricultural and resource economics. Agricultural and resource economics plays a huge role in development. They are subdivided into four main characteristics which in this topic, students can talk about: – mineral and energy resources; – soil resources, water resources; – biological resources. One or even all of them can be a focus of the thesis.
  • Water as an economic good in irrigated agriculture.
  • Agriculture in the economic development of Iran.
  • The US Agricultural Food Policy and Production .
  • Pesticides usage on agricultural products in California.

The region of greatest pesticide use was San Joaquin Valley.

  • An analysis of economic efficiency in agriculture. A lot of research has been done on the question of economic efficiency in agriculture. However, it does not mean there is no place for your study. You have to read a lot of secondary sources to see where your arguments can fit.

đŸ€â€Economic Sociology

  • Theory, approach, and method in economics sociology.
  • Economic sociology of capitalism. While economists believe in the positive effect capitalism has on the economy, the social effect is quite different. The “economic” part of the issue has been studied a lot. However, the sociology of it has been not. This thesis can be very intriguing to read.
  • Political Economy and Economic Sociology.
  • Gender and economic sociology .
  • Progress, sociology, and economics.
  • Data analysis in economics, sociology, environment .
  • Economic sociology as a way to understand the human mind.
  • Economic sociology of money.
  • Economics, sociology, and psychology of security.
  • Major principles of economic sociology. In the past decade, economic sociology became an increasingly popular field. Mainly due to it giving a new view on economics, human mind, and behavior. Besides, it explores relationships between politics, law, culture, and gender.

📚 The List of Ph.D. Topics in Economics

If you decide to go to grad school to do your Masters, you will likely end up getting a Ph.D. as well. So, with this plan in mind, think about a field that interests you enough during your Masters. Working with the same topic for both graduate degrees is easier and more effective.

This list of Ph.D. Topics in Economics can help you identify the areas you can work on.

  • Occupational injuries in Pakistan and its effect on the economy. Injuries are the leading cause of the global burden of disability. Globally, Pakistan was ranked 9th populated country with a large number of unskilled workers. In this dissertation, consider the link between occupational injuries and their effects on the economy.
  • The study of the Philippines’ economic development.

The Philippine economy is projected to continue on its expansionary path.

  • Financial derivatives and climate change .
  • Econometric Analysis of Financial Markets.
  • Islamic Banking and Financial Markets .
  • Health economics and policy in the UK.
  • Health insurance: rationale and economic justification. In this dissertation, students can find different ways to explain and justify health insurance. Starting to philosophical to purely economic grounds. In the past years, there was a lot of discussion regarding the healthcare system for all. What are some of the economic benefits of that?
  • Colombian economy, economic growth, and inequality.
  • Benefits of mergers and acquisitions in agribusiness.
  • Methods to measure financial risks when investing in Africa.
  • The significance of financial economics in understanding the relationship between a country’s GDP and NDP.
  • Network effects in cryptocurrency. Cryptocurrencies are not new anymore. However, it is still an original subject for a dissertation. Students can decide to choose several crypto coins and evaluate the importance of the network effect. This effect is particularly significant for Bitcoin. Explain why.
  • The comparison of the Chinese growth model with the American growth model.
  • An economic justification versus political expediency.
  • Pollution Externalities Role in Management Economics .

📝 How to Select an Economics Thesis Topic

As your academic journey is coming to an end, it’s time to pick the right topic for your thesis. The whole academic life you were preparing to undertake this challenge.

Here is the list of six points that will help you to select an economics thesis topic:

  • Make sure it is something you are genuinely interested in. It is incredibly challenging to write something engaging if you are not interested in the topic. So, choose wisely and chose what excites you.
  • Draw inspiration from the previous student’s projects. A great place to start is by looking at what the previous students wrote. You can find some fresh ideas and a general direction.
  • Ask your thesis advisor for his feedback. Most probably, your thesis advisor supervised many students before. They can be a great help too because they know how to assess papers. Before meeting with your professor, do some basic research, and understand what topic is about.
  • Be original, but not too much. You do not want to spend your time writing about a project that many people wrote about. Your readers will not be interested in reading it, but your professors as well. However, make sure you do not pick anything too obscure. It will leave you with no secondary sources.
  • Choose a narrow and specific topic. Not only will it allow you to be more original, but also to master a topic. When the issue is too broad, there is just too much information to cover in one thesis.
  • Go interdisciplinary. If you find yourself interested in history, philosophy, or any other related topic, it can help you write an exceptional thesis in economics. Most of your peers may work on pure economics. Then, the interdisciplinary approach can help you to stand out among them.

Some universities ask their students to focus on topics from one discipline.

Thank you for reading the article to the end! We hope this list of economics thesis topics ideas could help you to gather your thoughts and get inspired. Share it with those who may find it useful. Let us know what you think about it in the comment section below.

🔗 References

  • Economics Thesis Topics List: Seminars Only
  • How To Pick A Topic For Your Economics Research Project Or Master’s Thesis: INOMICS, The Site for Economists
  • What Do Theses and Dissertations Look Like: KU Writing Center, the University of Kansas
  • Writing Economics: Robert Neugeboren with Mireille Jacobson, University of Harvard
  • Economics Ph.D. Theses: Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School, IDEAS_RePEc
  • World Economic Situation and Prospects 2018: United Nations
  • Undergraduate Honors Theses: Department of Economics, University of California, Berkeley
  • Economics Department Dissertations Collection: Economics Department, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Topics for Master Theses: Department of Economics, NHH, Norwegian School of Economics
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A very well written, clear and easy-to-read article. It was highly helpful. Thank you!

Thanks for your kind words! We look forward to seeing you again!

For research

Excellent research

These are very helpful and concise research topics which I have spent days surfing the internet to get all this while. Thanks for making research life experience easier for me. Keep this good work up.

Glad to hear that! Thank you for your feedback, Idris!

Thank you, Idris!

I wants it for msc thesis

The dilemma I faced in getting Thesis proposal for my M Phil programme is taken away. Your article would be a useful guide to many more students.Thank you for your guidance.

Thanks for the feedback, John! Your opinion is very important for us!

Master's Thesis

The master's thesis is a major research project that is conducted under the supervision of a member of the department. The completed thesis must be presented and successfully defended in an oral examination administered by a formal thesis committee. Thesis credit is awarded when a final draft is approved by the thesis committee. It is important to note that a master's thesis must contain original work and cannot be submitted as a paper in other courses.

Learn more about the master's thesis

2022-2023 Master's Theses

Yunru Bai: "The Impact of Urbanization on Health Outcomes using Evidence from China" Advisor: Jeff Zabel

Sudarshan Bashyal: "Birth Year Environment and Adult Life Outcomes for Females: Evidence from Nepal" Advisor: Adam Storeygard

Yunning (Kevin) Cao: "Agricultural Adaptations and Depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer" Advisor: Ujjayant Chakravorty

Mingsong Chen: "Heterogeneous Impact of Temperature Shocks: Are Urban Areas More Resilient?“ Advisor: Ujjayant Chakravorty

John Luigi Dela Pena*: "Impact of Logging Bans in Deforestation: Evidence from the Vietnam-Laos Boarder“ Advisor: Ujjayant Chakravorty

Fatimah Faisal: "The Impact of a Cash Windfall on Women's Empowerment in India" Advisor: Cynthia Kinnan

Ruodong He: "The 2018 Trade Ware and U.S. Local Labor Markets" Advisor: Federico Esposito

Nan Jiang: “Local Fiscal Multipliers in China" Advisor: ChaeWon Baek

Tiantian Ji: "Heterogeneous Effects of Stay-at-Home (SAH) Orders on Labor Market Outcomes over Different Age Groups" Advisor: ChaeWon Baek

Sanjana Kadyan: "Environmental Policy Uncertainty and Investment Behavior in Sustainable Financial Markets" Advisor: Alan Finkelstein Shapiro

Ibrahim Kilic: "The Effects of Strategic Alliances on Airline On-Time Performance: Evidence from U.S. Domestic Travel" Advisor: Silke Forbes

Taoran Liu: "Political Connection and Regional Development in China" Advisor: Enrico Spolaore

Jiayin Liu: "Role of Public Preference Polarization in Determining Government Delay" Advisor: Enrico Spolaore

Qi Peng: "The Relationship Between Financial Literacy and Households' Savings Rate" Advisor: Marcelo Bianconi

Kwok Wai So: "News Media Consumption and Political Ideology" Advisor: Enrico Spolaore

Shengbin Wei*: "Essays in Political Interactions" Advisor: Yannis Ioannides and Enrico Spolaore

Li (Dereck) Yang: "The Asset-Pricing Implications of Policy Uncertainty" Advisor: Federico Esposito

Yifan Yang: "Does the Chinese Carbon Trading Policy Achieve It's Goals?" Advisor: Ujjayant Chakravorty

Zhizhen Zhao: "The Impact of Mixed Ownership Reform on the Wage Cap in State-Owned Enterprises" Advisor: Silke Forbes

Ziqi Zhou: "The Effect of Household Registration (Hukou) System on Mobility Choices and Housing Demand in China" Advisor: Yannis Ioannides

Jie Zhou*: "Withhold Release Orders, Firm Behavior Regarding Compliance on Forced Labor and Business Outcomes in the Malaysian Palm Oil Industry" Advisor: Drusilla Brown

Yanlin (Sebastian) Zhu: "The Association of Emotions and Public Goods Contribution" Advisor: Laura Gee

* Linda Datcher Loury Award Recipient

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Dissertation for msc development economics.

master thesis development economics

Key information

Module overview.

Students are required to complete a 10,000-word dissertation in development economics (100% of module mark). Students are encouraged to select topics appropriate to their specific programme and expertise within the Department more generally. Students are required to submit a proposed dissertation title, approved by a member of staff, during the second term.

The dissertation is completed during the summer under the supervision of a member of the Department. Supervisors are allocated by the Department based on approved topics and staff availability. Supervisors provide guidance on source material, hypothesis formulation, research methods and structure but will not read complete drafts.

Dissertations must be submitted in September. They are marked by two internal examiners (the supervisor and another member of the Department) and in some cases by an external examiner. Dissertations are assessed on the basis of presentation, structure, analytical depth and originality. Recent titles have included:

  • Political Economy of Aid and Consequences for Poverty Reduction.
  • Examining the Relationship between AIDS and the Pressures of Social Welfare
  • The Political Economy of Caribbean Integration: Prospects and Potential for the CSME in advancing regional development’
  • Global Financial Flows and Development Investments
  • The Role of Learning Rents in Industrial Policy: A Comparative Institutional Analysis of Egypt and Korea’

Objectives and learning outcomes

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate their substantial understanding of a key issue, topic or theme relating to development economics.
  • Organize their ideas in response to theoretical and empirical material and plan, develop and present a written argument in relation to this.
  • Show their ability to effectively gather, manage, synthesize and employ relevant data in support of their written argument.
  • Demonstrate their capacity to work independently under the guidance of an academic supervisor.
  • Show that they have followed good academic research practice and have achieved a good level of competence in academic writing.

Important notice regarding  changes to programmes and modules .

Professor Costas Lapavitsas

Theory of banking and finance, History of economic thought, Japanese financial system.

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Having graduated from SOAS in 1991, Samantha Mitchell has carved a career as a Technology Lawyer and External Affairs Consultant. But SOAS also brought so much more to her life, including lifelong friends and a sense of belonging.

master thesis development economics

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MSc Economics at SOAS University of London

International and Development Economics

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The IDE Program is a one-year Master's program intended to help students build the necessary toolkit for embracing obstacles in their future careers.

The global economic environment has become increasingly complex and poses a myriad of new challenges for policy and data analysts and professionals in all fields.

The ability to respond to rapid changes in this environment requires that leaders have a detailed understanding of the economic forces that affect economic outcomes. Careful economic policy analysis requires practitioners who can make use of the most current theoretical academic literature, as well as do empirical and econometric analysis using the latest approaches and methods.

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The IDE program at Yale University, housed within the  Economic Growth Center (EGC) and the Department of Economics, is a one-year Masters program intended to help students build the necessary toolkit for embracing such obstacles in their future careers, whether as career practitioners and economic analysts or to follow a path through the policy analysis field on their way to subsequent Ph.D. work.

This site is to inform prospective students of the program, the university and life in New Haven. We encourage prospective students to also visit the website of the  Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) for more information on the application procedure, policies, living in New Haven and other Yale facilities that are all open to IDE Students.

Additionally, this site will provide current students with access to all information they need on a daily basis and the rich alumni network. In the last 65 years, graduates have followed careers in all sectors of work. We encourage current students to reach out to alumni and benefit from their advice.

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The dv410 dissertation is a major component of the msc programme and an important part of the learning and development process involved in postgraduate education., research design and dissertation in international development.

The DV410 dissertation is a major component of the MSc programme and an important part of the learning and development process involved in postgraduate education. The objective of DV410  is to provide students with an overview of the resources available to them to research and write a 10,000 dissertation that is topical, original, scholarly, and substantial. DV410 will provide curated dissertation pathways through LSE LIFE and Methods courses, information sessions, ID-specific disciplinary teaching, topical seminars and dissertation worksops in ST. With this in mind, students will be able to design their own training pathway and set their own learning objectives in relation to their specific needs for their dissertation. From the Autumn Term (AT) through to Summer Term (ST), students will discuss and develop their ideas in consultation with their mentor or other members of the ID department staff and have access to a range of learning resources (via DV410 Moodle page) to support and develop their individual projects from within the department and across the LSE. 

Prizewinning dissertations

The archive of prizewinning dissertations showcases the best MSc dissertations from previous years. These offer a useful guide to current students on how to prepare and write a high calibre dissertation.

2022-OW (PDF) The Politics of Political Conditionality: How theEU Is Failing the Western Balkans Pim W.R.Oudejans Joint winner of Mayling Birney Prize for Best Overall Performance MSc Development Management 

2022-GN (PDF) An Empirical Study of the Impact of Kenya’sFree Secondary Education Policy on Women’sEducation Nora Geiszl Winner of Prize for Best Dissertation MSc Development Management 

2022-JC  (PDF) Giving with one hand, taking with the other:the contradictory political economy of socialgrants in South Africa Jack Calland Prize for Best Overall Performance MSc Development Studies

2022-GL (PDF) State Versus Market: The Case of Tobacco Consumption in Eastern European and Former Soviet Transition Economies Letizia Gazzaniga Joint winner of Prize for Best Overall Performance MSc Health and International Development

2022-ER (PDF) Reproductive injustice across forced migration trajectories: Evidence from female asylum-seekers fleeing Central America’s Northern Triangle Emily Rice Joint winner of Prize for Best Overall Performance MSc Health and International Development

2022-LICB  (PDF) The effects of Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) on child nutrition following an adverseweather shock: the case of Indonesia Liliana Itamar Carillo Barba Winner Prize for Best Dissertation MSc Health and International Development 2022-SC (PDF) Fiscal Responses to Conditional Debt Relief:the impact of multilateral debt cancellation on taxation patterns Sara Cucaro  Joint winner of Prize for Best Dissertation MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies

2022-RM  (PDF) Navigating humanitarian space(s) to provideprotection and assistance to internally displacedpersons: applying the concept of ahumanitarian ‘micro-space’ to the caseof Rukban in Syria Miranda Russell  Joint winner of Prize for Best Dissertation MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies

2021-CC  (PDF) International Remittances and the COVID-19 Pandemic: Investigating Resilient Remittance Flows from Italy during 2020 Carla Curreli Joint winner of Mayling Birney Prize for Best Overall Performance and Winner of Prize for Best Dissertation MSc Development Management 

2021-NB  (PDF) Reluctant respondents: Early settlement by developing countries during WTO disputes Nicholas Baxtar Joint winner of Mayling Birney Prize for Best Overall Performance MSc Development Management (Specialism: Applied Development)

2021-CD  (PDF) One Belt, Many Roads? A Comparison of Power Dynamics in Chinese Infrastructure Financing of Kenya and Angola Conor Dunwoody  Winner of Prize for Best Dissertation MSc Development Studies

2021-NN  (PDF) Tool for peace or tool for power? Interrogating Turkish ‘water diplomacy’ in the case of Northern Cyprus Nina Newhouse Winner of Prize for Best Overall Performance MSc Development Studies

2021-CW  (PDF) Exploring Legal Aid Provision for LGBTIQ+Asylum Seekers in the American Southwest from 2012-2021 Claire Wever Winner of Prize for Best Dissertation MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies

2021-BP  (PDF) Instrumentalising Threat; An Expansion of Biopolitical Control Over Exiles in Calais During the COVID-19 Pandemic Bethany Plant Joint winner of Prize for Best Overall Performance MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies

2021-HS  (PDF) A New “Green Grab”? A Multi-Scalar Analysis of Exclusion in the Lake Turkana Wind Power (LTWP) Project, Kenya Helen Sticklet Joint winner of Prize for Best Overall Performance MSc International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies

2021-GM  (PDF) Fuelling policy: The Role of Public Health Policy-Support Tools in Reducing Household Air Pollution as a Risk-Factor for Non-Communicable Diseases in LMICs Georgina Morris Winner of Prize for Best Dissertation MSc Health and International Development 

2021-LC  (PDF) How do women garment workers employ practices of everyday resistance to challenge the patriarchal gender order of Sri Lankan society? Lois Cooper Joint winner of Prize for Best Overall Performance MSc Health and International Development 

2020-LK  (PDF) Can international remittances mitigate negative effects of economic shocks on education? – The case of Nigeria Lara Kasperkovitz Best Overall Performance Best Dissertation Prize International Development and Humanitarian Emergengies 

“Fallen through the Cracks” The Network for Childhood Pneumonia and Challenges in Global Health Governance  Eva Sigel Best Overall Performance Health and International Development 

2020-AB  (PDF) Fighting the ‘Forgotten’ Disease: LiST-Based Analysis of Pneumonia Prevention Interventions to Reduce Under-Five Mortality in High-Burden Countries Alexandra Bland Best Dissertation Prize  Health and International Development   

2020-TP  (PDF) Techno-optimism and misalignment: Investigating national policy discourses on the impact of ICT in educational settings in Sub-Saharan Africa Tao Platt Best Overall Performance Development Studies 

2020-HS  (PDF)  “We want land, all the rest is humbug”: land inheritance reform and intrahousehold dynamics in India Holly Scott Best Dissertation Prize Development Studies   

2020-PE  (PDF)  Decent Work for All? Waste Pickers’ Collective Action Frames after Formalisation in Bogotá, Colombia  Philip Edge Mayling Birney Prize for Best Overall Performance Development Management

2020-LC  (PDF)  Variation in Bilateral Investment Treaties: What Leads to More ‘Flexibility for Development’? Lindsey Cox Best Dissertation Prize Development Management

2019-GR (PDF) Political Economy of Industrial Policy: Analysinglongitudinal and crossnationalvariations in industrial policy in Brazil andArgentina Grace Reeve Best Overall Performance Development Studies 

2019-MM (PDF) The Securitisation of Development Projects: The Indian State’s Response to the Maoist Insurgency Monica Moses Best Dissertation Prize Development Studies 

2019-KM (PDF) At the End of Emergency: An Exploration of Factors Influencing Decision-making Surrounding Medical Humanitarian Exit Kaitlyn Macneil Best Overall Performance Prize Health and International Development

2019-KA (PDF) The Haitian Nutritional Paradox: Driving factors of the Double Burden of Malnutrition Khandys Agnant Best Dissertation Prize Health and International Development   

2019-NL (PDF) Women in the Rwandan Parliament: Exploring Descriptive and Substantive Representation Nicole London Best Dissertation Prize Development Management 

2019-CB (PDF) Post-conflict reintegration: the long-termeffects of abduction and displacement on theAcholi population of northern Uganda Charlotte Brown Mayling Birney Prize for Best Overall Performance Development Management 

2019-NLeo (PDF) Making Fashion Sense: Can InternationalLabour Standards Improve Accountabilityin Globalised Fast Fashion? Nicole Leo Mayling Birney Prize for Best Overall Performance Development Management 

2019-AS (PDF) Who Controls Whom? Evaluating theinvolvement of Development FinanceInstitutions (DFIs) in Build Own-Operate (BOO)Energy Projects in relation to Market Structures& Accountability Chains: The case of theBujagali Hydropower Project (BHPP) in Uganda Aya Salah Mostafa Ali Best Dissertation Prize African Development 

2019-NG (PDF) Addressing barriers to treatment-seekingbehaviour during the Ebola outbreak in SierraLeone: An International Response Perspective Natasha Glendening India Best Overall Performance Prize African Development 

2019-SYJ (PDF) The Traditional Global Care Chain and the Global Refugee Care Chain: A Comparative Analysis Sana Yasmine Johnson Best Dissertation Prize Best Overall Performance Prize International Development and Humanitarian Emergengies 

2018-JR (PDF) Nudging, Teaching, or Coercing?: A Review of Conditionality Compliance Mechanisms on School Attendance Under Conditional Cash Transfer Programs Jonathan Rothwell Best Dissertation Prize African Development 

2018-LD (PDF) A Feminist Perspective On Burundi's Land Reform Ladd Serwat Best Overall Performance African Development 

2018-KL (PDF) Decentralisation: Road to Development or Bridge to Nowhere? Estimating the Effect of Devolution on Infrastructure Spending in Kenya Kurtis Lockhart  Best Dissertation Prize and Mayling Birney Prize for Best Overall Performance Development Management 

2018-OS (PDF) From Accountability to Quality: Evaluating the Role of the State in Monitoring Low-Cost Private Schools in Uganda and Kenya Oceane Suquet Mayling Birney Prize for Best Overall Performance Development Management 

2018-LN (PDF) Water to War: An Analysis of Drought, Water Scarcity and Social Mobilization in Syria Lian Najjar Best Dissertation Prize International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies

2018-IS  (PDF) “As devastating as any war”?: Discursive trends and policy-making in aid to Central America’s Northern Triangle Isabella Shraiman  Best Overall Performance  International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies

2017-AR (PDF) Humanitarian Reform and the Localisation Agenda:Insights from Social Movement and Organisational Theory Alice Robinson Winner of the Prize for Best Overall Performance International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies (IDHE)

2017-ACY (PDF) The Hidden Costs of a SuccessfulDevelopmental State:Prosperity and Paucity in Singapore Agnes Chew Yunquian Winner of the Prize for Best Overall Performance Development Managament 

2017-HK  (PDF) Premature Deindustrialization and Stalled Development, the Fate of Countries Failing Structural Transformation? Helen Kirsch Winner of the Best Dissertation in Programme Development Studies

2017-HZ  (PDF) ‘Bare Sexuality’ and its Effects onUnderstanding and Responding to IntimatePartner Sexual Violence in Goma, DemocraticRepublic of the Congo (DRC) Heather Zimmerman Winner of the Best Dissertation in Programme International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies (IDHE)

2017-KT  (PDF) Is Good Governance a Magic Bullet?Examining Good Governance Programmes in Myanmar Khine Thu Winner of the Best Dissertation in Programme Development Managament 

2017-NL  (PDF) Persistent Patronage? The DownstreamElectoral Effects of Administrative Unit Creationin Uganda Nicholas Lyon  Winner of the Best Dissertation in Programme African Development 

2016-MV  (PDF) Contract farming under competition: exploring the drivers of side selling among sugarcane farmers in Mumias             Milou Vanmulken  Winner of the Prize for Best Dissertation                                                      Dev elopment Management                

2016-JS  (PDF) Resource Wealth and Democracy: Challenging the  Assumptions of the Redistributive Model              Janosz Schäfer  Winner of the Prize for Best Overall Performance Development Studies                

2016-LK   (PDF) Shiny Happy People: A study of the effects income relative to a reference group exerts on life satisfaction             Lajos Kossuth Winner of the Prize for Best Overall Performance                                     Development Studies  

2015-MP (PDF) "Corruption by design" and the management of infrastructure in Brazil: Reflections on the Programa de Aceleração ao Crescimento - PAC.             Maria da Graça Ferraz de Almeida Prado                                                          Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation                                          Development Managment                                                                                  

2015-IE (PDF) Breaking Out Of the Middle-Income Trap: Assessing the Role of Structural Transformation.                                                                               Ipek Ergin                                                                                                   Winner of the Prize for Best Dissertation Development Studies

2015-AML (PDF) Labour Migration, Social Movements and Regional Integration: A Comparative Study of the Role of Labour Movements in the Social Transformation of the Economic Community of West African States and the Southern African Development Community.             Anne Marie Engtoft Larsen                                                                                Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation                                   Development Management

2015-MM (PDF) Who Bears the Burden of Bribery? Evidence from Public Service Delivery in Kenya                     Michael Mbate                                                                                                   Winner of the Prize for Best Dissertation and Best Overall Performance Development Management

2015-KK (PDF) Export Processing Zones as Productive Policy: Enclave Promotion or Developmental Asset? The Case of Ghana. Kilian Koffi Winner of the Prize for Best Dissertation African Development

2015-GM (PDF) Forgive and Forget? Reconciliation and Memory in Post-Biafra Nigeria. Gemma Mehmed Winner of the Prize for Best Dissertation International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies (IDHE)

2015-AS (PDF) From Sinners to Saviours: How Non-State Armed Groups use service delivery to achieve domestic legitimacy. Anthony Sequeira Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation and Best Overall Performance International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies (IDHE)

2014-NS (PDF) Anti-Corruption Agencies: Why Do Some Succeed and Most Fail? A Quantitative Political Settlement Analysis. Nicolai Schulz Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Studies

2014-MP (PDF) International Capital Flows and Sudden Stops: a global or a domestic issue? Momchil Petkov Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Studies

2014-TC (PDF) Democracy to Decline: do democratic changes jeopardize economic growth? Thomas Coleman Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Management

2014-AK (PDF) Intercultural Bilingual Education: the role of participation in improving the quality of education among indigenous communities in Chiapas, Mexico. Anni Kasari Excellent Dissertation and Best Overall Performance Development Management

2014-EL (PDF) Treaty Shopping in International Investment Arbitration: how often has it occurred and how has it been perceived by tribunals? Eunjung Lee Joint Winner of the Prize for Best Dissertation Development Management

2013-SB (PDF) Refining Oil - A Way Out of the Resource Curse? Simon Baur Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Management

2013-NI (PDF) The Rise of ‘Murky Protectionism’: Changing Patterns of Trade-Related Industrial Policies in Developing Countries: A case study of Indonesia. Nicholas Intscher Joint Winner of the Prize for Best Dissertation and Best Overall Performance Development Studies

2013-JF (PDF) Why Settle for Less? An Analysis of Settlement in WTO Disputes. Jillian Feirson Joint Winner of the Prize for Best Dissertation Development Studies

2013-LH (PDF) Corporate Social Responsibility in Mining: The effects of external pressures and corporate leadership. Leah Henderson Joint Winner of the Prize for Best Dissertation Development Studies

2013-BM (PDF) Estimating incumbency advantages in African politics: Regression discontinuity evidence from Zambian parliamentary and local government elections. Bobbie Macdonald Excellent Dissertation and Best Overall Performance Development Studies

WP145 (PDF) Is History Repeating Itself? A Critical Discourse Analysis of the Representation of Women in Climate Change Campaigns. Catherine Flanagan Joint Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Studies

WP144 (PDF) Disentangling the fall of a 'Dominant-Hegemonic Party Rule'. The case of Paraguay and its transition to a competitive electoral democracy. Dominica Zavala Zubizarreta Joint Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Management

WP143 (PDF) Enabling Productive Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries: Critical issues in policy design. Noor Iqbal Joint Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Studies

WP142 (PDF) Beyond 'fear of death': Strategies of coping with violence and insecurity - A case study of villages in Afghanistan. Angela Jorns Joint Winner of the Prize for Best Dissertation Development Studies

WP141 (PDF) What accounts for opposition party strength? Exploring party-society linkages in Zambia and Ghana. Anna Katharina Wolkenhauer Joint Winner, Best Overall Performance Development Studies

WP140 (PDF) Between Fear and Compassion: How Refugee Concerns Shape Responses to Humanitarian Emergencies - The case of Germany and Kosovo. Sebastian Sahla Joint Winner, Best Overall Performance Development Management

WP139 (PDF) Worlds Apart? Health-seeking behaviour and strategic healthcare planning in Sierra Leone. Thea Tomison Joint Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Studies

WP138 (PDF) War by Other Means? An Analysis of the Contested Terrain of Transitional Justice Under the 'Victor's Peace' in Sri Lanka. Richard Gowing Best Overall Performance and Best Dissertation International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies (IDHE)

WP137 (PDF) Social Welfare Policy - a Panacea for Peace? A Political Economy Analysis of the Role of Social Welfare Policy in Nepal's Conflict and Peace-building Process. Annie Julia Raavad Joint Winner, Best Overall Performance and Excellent Dissertation Development Studies

WP136 (PDF) Women and the Soft Sell: The Importance of Gender in Health Product Purchasing Decisions. Adam Alagiah Joint Winner, Best Overall Performance Development Management

WP135 (PDF) Human vs. State Security: How can Security Sector Reforms contribute to State-Building? The case of the Afghan Police Reform. Florian Weigand Joint Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Management

WP134 (PDF) Evaluating the Impact of Decentralisation on Educational Outcomes: The Peruvian Case. Siegrid Holler-Neyra Winner of the Prize for Best Dissertation Development Management

WP133 (PDF) Democracy and Public Good Provision: A Study of Spending Patterns in Health and Rural Development in Selected Indian States. Sreelakshmi Ramachandran Joint Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Management

WP132 (PDF) Intellectual Property Rights and Technology Transfer to Developing Countries: a Reassessment of the Current Debate Marco Valenza Joint Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Studies

WP131 (PDF) Traditional or Transformational Development? A critical assessment of the potential contribution of resilience to water services in post-conflict Sub-Saharan Africa. Christopher Martin Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies (IDHE)

WP128  (PDF) The demographic dividend in India: Gift or curse? A State level analysis on differeing age structure and its implications for India's economic growth prospects. Vasundhra Thakurd Joint Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Management

WP127  (PDF) When Passion Dries Out, Reason Takes Control: A Temporal Study of Rebels' Motivation in Fighting Civil Wars. Thomas Tranekaer Joint Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Management

WP126  (PDF) Micro-credit - More Lifebuoy than Ladder? Understanding the role of micro-credit in coping with risk in the context of the Andhra Pradesh crisis. Anita Kumar Best Overall Performance and Best Dissertation Development Management

WP124 (PDF) Welfare Policies in Latin America: the transformation of workers into poor people. Anna Popova Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Studies

WP123  (PDF) How Wide a Net? Targeting Volume and Composition in Capital Inflow Controls. Lucas Issacharoff Best Overall Performance and Excellent Dissertation Development Studies

WP117 (PDF) Shadow Education: Quantitative and Qualitative analysis of the impact of the educational reform (implementation of centralized standardised testing). Nataliya Borodchuk Best Overall Performance and Excellent Dissertation Development Management

WP115 (PDF) Can School Decentralization Improve Learning? Autonomy, participation and student achievement in rural Pakistan. Anila Channa Joint Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Management

WP114 (PDF) Good Estimation or Good Luck? Growth Accelerations revisited. Guo Xu Best Overall Performance and Best Dissertation Development Studies

WP113 (PDF) Furthering Financial Literacy: Experimental evidence from a financial literacy program for Microfinance Clients in Bhopal, India. Anna Custers Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Studies

WP112 (PDF) Consumption, Development and the Private Sector: A critical analysis of base of the pyramid (BoP) ventures. David Jackman Winner of the Prize for Best Disseration Development Management

WP106 (PDF) Reading Tea Leaves: The Impacy of Mainstreaming Fair Trade. Lindsey Bornhofft Moore Joint Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Studies

WP104 (PDF) Institutions Collide: A Study of "Caste-Based" Collective Criminality and Female Infanticide in India, 1789-1871. Maria Brun Joint Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Studies

WP102 (PDF) Democratic Pragmatism or Green Radicalism? A critical review of the relationship between Free, Prior and Informed Consent and Policymaking for Mining. Abbi Buxton Joint Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Management

WP100 (PDF) Market-Led Agrarian Reform: A Beneficiary perspective of Cédula da Terra. Veronika Penciakova Joint Winner of the Prize for Best Overall Performance Development Studies

WP98 (PDF) No Business like Slum Business? The Political Economy of the Continued Existence of Slums: A case study of Nairobi. Florence Dafe Joint Winner of the Prize for Best Dissertation Development Studies

WP97 (PDF) Power and Choice in International Trade: How power imbalances constrain the South's choices on free trade agreements, with a case study of Uruguay. Lily Ryan-Collins Joint Winner of the Prize for Best Overall Dissertation Development Management

WP96 (PDF) Health Worker Motivation and the Role of Performance Based Finance Systems Africa: A Qualitative Study on Health Worker Motivation and the Rwandan Performance Based finance initiative in District Hospitals. Friederike Paul Joint Winner of the Prize for Best Overall Dissertation Development Management

WP95 (PDF) Crisis in the Countryside: Farmer Suicides and the Political Economy of Agrarian Distress in India. Bala Posani Winner of the Prize for Best Overall Performance Development Management

WP94 (PDF) From Rebels to Politicians. Explaining Rebel-to Party Transformations after Civil War: The case of Nepal. Dominik Klapdor Winner of the Prize for Excellent Dissertation Development Management

WP92 (PDF) Guarding the State or Protecting the Economy? The Economic factors of Pakistan's Military coups. Amina Ibrahim Winner of the Prize for Best Dissertation Development Studies

WP91 (PDF) Man is the remedy of man: Constructions of Masculinity and Health-Related Behaviours among Young men in Dakar, Senegal. Sarah Helen Mathewson Winner of the Prize for Best Overall Performance Development Studies

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Home > CLA > ECON > Applied Economics Masters Theses Collection

Applied Economics Masters Theses Collection

This collection contains open access and campus access Masters theses, made possible through Graduate Studies at the University of Massachusetts Boston. The full content of open access theses is available to all, although some files may have embargoes placed on them and will be made available as soon as possible. The full content of campus access theses is only available to those either on the UMass Boston campus or with a UMass Boston campus username and password. Click on the "Off-Campus UMass Boston Users" link on the record page to download Campus Access publications. Those not on campus and those without a UMass Boston campus username and password may gain access to this thesis through resources like Proquest Dissertations & Theses Global or through Interlibrary Loan.

Theses from 2019 2019

Off The Farm: An Evaluation Of Non-Farm Earnings And Employment On Poverty Alleviation In Rural Nicaragua , Magaly Vanessa Saenz Somarriba

Theses from 2018 2018

Hydropower in the Decarbonized Mauritian Grid: A Prospective Study , Benjamin M. Havumaki

Renewable Biomass Energy Utilization in Mauritius: A Cost-Minimization Approach , Ariana K. Lema-Driscoll

Theses from 2016 2016

Trends in Marriage and Women's Earnings: Evidence From Administrative Data , Kristie L. Flaherty

Financial Markets and the American Working Class: An Empirical Investigation of Financial Stress , Michael J. McCormack

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master thesis development economics

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master thesis development economics

  • Ritsumeikan University
  • College of Economics
  • Graduate School of Economics
  • Title List of Master's Thesis

List of Master's Thesis Graduate School of Economics Ritsumeikan University(Completed in 2023)

  • Analysis of factors affecting Public Debt Management in Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU) countries
  • Asymmetric response of credit to monetary policy rate: The case of Tajikistan
  • Assessing the Implementation of Macroprudential Tools: LTV and DTI in Tajikistan, Insights from International Experience
  • Information Technology Adoption and Small and Medium Enterprise(SME’s) Performance: Does IT Adoption Reduce Rural Penalty
  • Impact of trade liberalization on tax revenue
  • Impact of institutional quality on remittance inflows in SADC countries
  • What Policy Is Effective to Enlarge Geothermal Power Capacity? An Empirical Evidence from Indonesia
  • The Impacts of ICT on Economic Growth
  • Securing Donations in Fundraising Sites:The Use of Seed Money for Campaigns
  • Analysis of The Impact of Covid-19 on Indonesia Economy
  • Analysis of influential factors to attract FDI in transition economies
  • Does Internet Use Reduce the Gender Income Gap in China?
  • Threshold impact of government debt on the mechanism of twin deficit: a panel data study
  • The determinants of purchase intention towards counterfeit products in Kyrgyz Republic
  • Welfare Impacts on Indonesian Households of Basic Income
  • The Effect of Official Development Assistance (ODA) on Agricultural Labor Productivity Growth in Central America and the Caribbean Region
  • Spillover Effects of Foreign Direct Investment on Local Firms’ Productivity: A case study of Vietnam
  • Financial Development and Energy Mix in Sub-Saharan African Countries
  • RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN TAJIKISTAN
  • Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in Tajikistan: Its contribution to the development of economy
  • Impact of fiscal decentralization on economic growth in local areas in Uzbekistan
  • The Influence of the Digital Business Development on China's Global Value Chain Participation

List of Master's Thesis Graduate School of Economics Ritsumeikan University(Completed in 2022)

  • Impact of the common financial market of the EAEU on the Kyrgyz Republic
  • Remittances and Economic Development
  • Assessing the Indonesian Rice Policies in Climate Change: A Partial Equilibrium Analysis
  • Non-experimental Impact Evaluation of a Conditional Cash Transfer Program on Poverty: Evidence from the Philippines
  • FACTORS INFLUENCING BEEF CONSUMPTION IN CHINA
  • An Empirical Study on the Factors Affecting the Market Penetration Rate of New Energy Vehicles in China
  • Research on the Direct Effect and Transfer Effect of the US-China Trade War on China's Exports
  • An econometric assessment of inbound tourism-led growth, in Sub Saharan African countries (SSA)
  • Customs bodies in the fight against counterfeit goods and protection of intellectual property.Use of the successful experience of Japan in the Kyrgyz Republic.
  • The procurement system of foreign electronics manufacturing enterprises in Vietnam
  • The Determinants Analysis of Creative Economy in Indonesia
  • Impact of leverage and short-term debt maturity on firm investment: An empirical analysis of Vietnamese listed firms
  • Promotion of Export by Prioritizing Specific Sectors: The Evidence of Myanmar
  • The Effect of Economic Growth and Education on Youth Unemployment Rate in Asia
  • Analysis of technical efficiency in cassava production in the case of Vietnam
  • The Asymmetric Effects of Real Effective Exchange Rate Volatility on Foreign Direct Investment: Empirical Evidence from 10 developing Asian Countries
  • Determinants of Energy Consumption in Africa: A Dynamic Panel Analysis
  • The Impact of Automation on the Labor Market in the Context of Population Aging in China
  • Macroeconomic Indicators and Their Effect on Pakistan Stock Market Movement

List of Master's Thesis Graduate School of Economics Ritsumeikan University(Completed in 2021)

  • Research on the determinants of intra-firm trade & arm's length trade of TNCs between China and U.S.: an empirical analysis on macro factors
  • Promotion of Small and Medium Enterprise Financing in Myanmar
  • What Makes Small Firms Grow? Finance, Human Capital, Technical Assistance, and Business Associations in Myanmar
  • Empirical Study on Relationship between Innovation and Income Inequality
  • Provision of labor contracts after the Labor Code 2012: analysis of firm-level data in Vietnam
  • Development of government domestic debt of the Kyrgyz Republic
  • Relationship between International trade and industrial policy in Tajikistan
  • Influence of the International Tax Agreements on the Investment Climate and Economic Determinants of Kyrgyzstan
  • Population Aging and Effectiveness of Macro-Policy in Japan
  • The rise of pension system
  • Climate Change Impact and Adaptation Policy Effectiveness on Rice Production in Indonesia
  • The Effect of Tax Rate Differences on Foreign Direct Investment in Indonesia: Bilateral Analysis
  • Fiscal Decentralization and Regional Economic Growth in Indonesia

List of Master's Thesis Graduate School of Economics Ritsumeikan University(Completed in 2020)

  • Public-private partnerships for the Kyrgyz Republic based on examples from other countries
  • GOING GREEN? CITIZEN VALUATION OF MULTIPURPOSE URBAN INFRASTRUCTURES IN A COMPACT URBAN MILIEU: A CASE STUDY FROM SANTA VENERA , MALTA
  • Manufacturing Development and Employment Creation in Nigeria: An Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) Approach
  • Privatization in Uzbekistan
  • A Comparative Analysis of Economic Recovery following the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster and the 2006 Java Earthquake: Economic Resilience and Roles of Mitigation Organizations
  • Public Health Spending, Governance, and Outcomes; Expanding the Links
  • Human Capital Investment for Street Connected Children of Malawi
  • Small Firms in Myanmar
  • Women’s knowledge of gender laws and their power over household decision-making: The case of Vietnam
  • Progressive tax system in Kyrgyz Republic
  • THE ROLE OF FOREIGN AIDS IN STATE BUILDING THE CASE OF SOMALIA
  • Relationship between Foreign Direct Investment and Balance of Payments in Myanmar
  • Corporate Social Responsibility and Technical Efficiency: A Stochastic Frontier Analysis of Japanese Automobile Manufacturing Firms
  • Financial Development, Household Debt and Income Inequality nexus:Cross-country Analyses
  • The Effectiveness of Official Development Assistance on Economic Stability of State: Evidence from Least Developed Countries. 
  • Empirical Analysis of Direct Payment Subsidies for Environmentally-Friendly Agriculture on Profit Efficiency of Rice Farmers in Japan
  • Evasion of Taxes in Kyrgyzstan. Methods of prevention.
  • A Spatial Econometric Analysis of Tourism Demand of Foreign Visitors to Japan : How are Regional Nature and Culture Connected Tourism Development?
  • The Effect of Environmental Regulation on Indonesian Wood Product Export
  • Livestock Total Factor Productivity in Indonesia
  • Factors to Improve Fisheries Household Welfare: Empirical Analysis of Indonesia
  • The Role of Secondary Sector in Poverty Alleviation in Indonesia
  • The Impact of the Ease of Doing Business on Foreign Direct Investment
  • The Impact of Trade Liberalization on Poverty Reduction in Indonesia: Regional Level Analysis
  • Female Labor Force Participation in Indonesia: Does Access to Basic Infrastructures Signify?

List of Master'sThesis Graduate School of Economics Ritsumeikan University(Completed in 2019)

  • The Impact of Government Expenditure and Economy on Crime Rates of the Kyrgyz Republic
  • Does renewable energy consumption ensure sustainable economic development in Bangladesh?
  • Tracing global value chain of the Kyrgyz Republic
  • Public health expenditure and health outcomes: Evidence from Asian countries
  • China's Monetary Policy and the Taylor Rule
  • SAVING RATIO AND ECONOMIC GROWTH
  • SMEs, Productivity and Growth: Evidence from Developing Economies
  • The Impact of Foreign Direct Investment on Economic Growth in Sub-Sahara Africa: The Role of Financial Market Development
  • Effective Management of the State Budget: Perspectives for the Kyrgyz Republic
  • Critical Success Factors for Successful Implementation of Public-Private Partnership (PPP) Investment in Transport Infrastructure Sector of Bangladesh
  • Rate of Life Insurance Consumption and Economic Growth: Evaluating Evidence from Selected Insurance Markets in Africa
  • The Effect of Ethnicity On The Financing Decision In South Africa
  • The Effect of Payment Method on Consumer Purchase Decisions -- A Perspective from the Payment Cost--
  • The Relation between Aging Population and Rural-Urban Income Gap
  • TRANSPORT INVESTMENT AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: CASE OF ZAMBIA
  • Estimating the Demand for Japanese Alcoholic Beverages Using Almost Ideal Demand System
  • Trade Liberalization, Aggregate Firm Value and Welfare Effect of Tariff: A Theoretical Approach.
  • Household Access to Credit and Children's Time Allocation: Evidence from Vietnam
  • ON THE DETERMINANTS OF FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT IN AFRICA: IS CENTRAL AFRICA DIFFERENT?
  • Innovation by Business Enterprises in Myanmar and Vietnam
  • State Economic Enterprises (SEEs) in Myanmar
  • Apparel Industry of Bangladesh: An Economic Impact Analysis of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs)
  • Bitcoin Price Growth and Thailand's Inflation
  • Does Financial Inclusion Affect Financial Stability in Low-Income Countries?
  • Impact of cost of doing business in inequality : A case study on BIMSTEC
  • Impact of Financial Development to Income Inequality in Vietnam
  • Technology Spillovers from Foreign Direct Investment: The Case of Vietnam
  • Analysis of China's International Trade: A Gravity Model
  • The impacts of Free Trade Agreements on Bilateral Trade Case study: Chile-Japan economic agreement
  • The Motivation of Foreign Exchange Intervention in China-from the Perspective of Maintaining Exchange Rate Stability
  • China's Real Estate Bubble Detection
  • Agglomeration and Location Decision of FDI in Indonesia
  • Income Inequality and Subjective Well-being in Indonesia
  • The Impact of Tariff and Imported Raw Materials on Textile and Clothing Export: Evidence from United States Market
  • Dose the Food Price Volatility Drive the Out Migration in Indonesia?
  • Urban Green Space (UGS) Valuation: A Case Study in Jakarta, Indonesia, using Travel Cost Method
  • Environmental Kuznets Curve for Environmental Quality in Indonesia: A Spatial Econometric Approach

List of Master's Thesis Graduate School of Economics Ritsumeikan University(Completed in 2018)

  • The Impact of Overconfidence Behavior and The Disposition Effect on Japan's Stock Exchange
  • The impact of project financing on the economic growth of Asian countries --The potential causes of Japanese private financial institutions' growing activity in Asian project financing --
  • Seigniorage and inflation tax
  • Sustainability Analysis of Bangladesh Government Debt
  • Gender differences in the effects of Financial Literacy on saving issues
  • Cost-Benefit Analyses of Anti-Money Laundering Regulation Why is there a lack of these analyses? Suggestions from previous studies
  • The participation of development banks and project performance in Energy PPI projects
  • The effect of sectoral composition of FDI on income inequality
  • Debt Sustainability in the Developing Countries: Case Study of the Kyrgyz Republic
  • Prospects of accession of the Kyrgyz Republic to the Customs Union (CU) and Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU)
  • Effect of Aid-for-Trade on Export by ASEAN Countries
  • Causal Dynamics between Renewable and Non-renewable Energy Consumption, Economic Output and Carbon Dioxide Emissions : An African Perspective.
  • Geoeconomic Factors Influencing Trade Flows in Uzbekistan: Gravity Model Approach
  • Impacts of Appliances Level Real-Time Feedback on Residential Electricity Consumption Behavior: An Experimental Study in Miyama City
  • The Impact of Government Health Expenditure on Health Outcomes
  • Improving methods of tax control in Kyrgyz Republic
  • Functional income distribution and economic growth in developing countries
  • Effects of carbon tax and emission trading on CO2 emissions in OECD countries
  • The Impact of Financial Inclusion on Reducing Poverty and Income Inequality in Developing Countries
  • THE SIGNIFICANCE OF UNDEREMPLOYMENT DUE TO SKILL MISMATCHES: Case Studies from Japanese MNCs in Thailand
  • Japanese Foreign Direct Investment in Bangladesh- A comparative study with those in other South Asian and ASEAN countries
  • Impact of Trade Openness on Economic Growth and Inequality: Evidences from BIMSTEC Countries
  • Economic Complexity, Human Capital and Income Inequality: A Cross-Country Analysis
  • Why Colonial History Matters to East Asia's Development
  • PREFERENCES FOR REDISTRIBUTION IN THE LAND OF THE RISING SUN
  • Wage Premium of the Public Sector in Indonesia
  • Household Socioeconomic Determinants to Sanitation Achievements in Indonesia ( A case study from Indonesia Family Life Survey)
  • Economic Growth, Urbanization & Human Development: Regional Perspective of Indonesia
  • Fiscal Decentralization and Environmental Problems in Indonesia: Local Budget Allocation and Environmental Quality
  • Minimum Wage Law Non-compliance: Does It Affect Teenage Employment and School Enrollment?
  • Gender Earning Gap in Indonesia: A Comparison Between Formal Sector and Informal Sector

List of Master's Thesis Graduate School of Economics Ritsumeikan University(Completed in 2017)

  • The role of Foreign Direct Investment on Kenya manufacturing sector: Lessons from East Asia experience
  • Performance and resilience of Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) and conventional funds during different shocks in 2016: evidence from Japan
  • THE EFFECTS OF LABOUR MARKET REGULATIONS ON PRODUCTIVITY AT FIRM LEVEL PERFORMANCE IN ASEAN
  • The Impact of External Debt on the Macroeconomic Sustainability of the Kyrgyz Republic.
  • The effects of renewable energy generation on electric power spot price of Japan Electric Power Exchange (JEPX)
  • PRODUCTIVITY SPILLOVER FROM FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT TO DOMESTIC FIRMS IN VIETNAM
  • ECONOMIC REFORM AND ITS IMPACTS ON FDI
  • Price Stability, Household Debt and the Role of Monetary Policy
  • The Contribution of Foreign Remittances for Poverty Alleviation and Income Inequality in Lower-Income Countries.
  • Are banks lazy? A Comprehensive Cross-Country Analysis of Government Borrowing and Private Sector Credit
  • The impact of tax incentives on foreign direct investment
  • ICT AS AN ENGINE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF MYANMAR
  • The Decentralization That Works for Local Communities --Lessons for Local Communities in Cote d'Ivoire--
  • The size and determinants of VAT collection efficiency: an empirical study in Vietnam
  • Natural Resources and Economic Growth: An Exploratory Study of Natural Gas in Tanzania
  • Gender-Gap Analysis on Labour Underutilization in Kenya: Does Marital Status matter?
  • Improvement of the functions of the irrigated land reclamation fund and lessons learned for Uzbekistan
  • Financial Inclusion as a Necessary Condition for Reaching Development Targets.
  • The crowding out effect of government borrowing on bank financed private credit
  • Use of external financial resources and their impact on the economy
  • The effects of Vietnamese immigrants on the U.S. shrimp fishery - Gulf of Mexico
  • UNITED WE STAND: THE ROLE OF SOCIAL CAPITAL IN DISASTER RECOVERY IN INDONESIA
  • FAMILY BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE: WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF TAX CUT POLICY ON THEM IN UZBEKISTAN?
  • The Impact of Mandatory Indonesian National Standard (INS) Regulation on Indonesia's Imports Case Study : Toys and Steel Industry
  • The Impact of Rice Price Subsidy on Nutrition Intake of the Poor: A Case of RASKIN Program in Indonesia
  • Multidimensional Poverty Analysis in Indonesia: A Comparison Between D.I. Yogyakarta and Kalimantan Selatan
  • A Panel Data Approach of ASEAN- Korea Free Trade Agreement (AKFTA) on Indonesian Trade: A Gravity Analysis
  • Fiscal Decentralization towards Economic and Human Development: A Case of Indonesia
  • Social Capital and Health: The empirical evidence from Indonesia
  • Estimating the Effect of Air Pollution on Health Insurance Coverage in Indonesia using Indonesian Family Life Survey

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master thesis development economics

Home > Academics > Master's Programmes > Master in Economics > The Best Master Thesis in Economics

The Best Master Thesis in Economics

Academic year 2022-2023, academic year 2021-2022, academic year 2020-2021, academic year 2019-2020, academic year 2018-2019, academic year 2017-2018.

  • Academic Year 2016-2017

Academic Year 2015-2016

Academic year 2014-2015.

Impact of conflicts on the underground drug economy in Aghanistan (PDF, 764 Ko) Antoine POL under the direction of Golvine de Rochambeau , Assistant Professor  of Economics at Sciences Po.

The case of win-win bilateral slot swapping between ECAC area competing airlines (PDF, 951 Ko)  Hugo BARRAS under the direction of   Marleen Marra , Assistant Professor of Economics at Sciences Po.

Do Banks Help Build? Evidence from the 19th century US (PDF, 2,7 Mo) Martin BERNSTEIN under the direction of Moritz Schularick , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po & Clement de Chaisemartin , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po, ERC Project REALLYCREDIBLE, NBER Faculty Research Fellow, J-PAL Affiliated Professor.

Heterogeneous firms and Sudden Stops: insights from Chile (PDF, 835 Ko) Natalia CARDENAS FRIAS under the direction of Xavier Ragot , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po et President of the OFCE.

Structural cost and network effects in a decentralized network: The case of Mastodon platform (PDF, 290 Ko) Mathias DACHERT under the direction of Michele Fioretti ,  Assistant Professor of Economics at Sciences Po.

Age-Earnings Profiles in China (PDF, 1,4 Mo) Fangqi DING under the direction of Moshe Buchinsky , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po.

Natural and Financial Crises: Do Natural Disasters Increase The Risk Of Financial Crises? (PDF, 701 Ko) Daniel FICHMANN under the direction of Moritz Schularick , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po.

Intergenerational mobility in Mauritius (PDF, 889 Ko) Jeteesha FOOLLEE under the direction of Roberto Galbiati , Professor (CNRS), CEPR Research Fellow, ANR Project SOSELF.

The merits of boarding (PDF, 2,3 Mo) Alexandre GRELLET under the direction of Clement de Chaisemartin , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po, ERC Project REALLYCREDIBLE, NBER Faculty Research Fellow , J-PAL Affiliated Professor.

Causal Effect of Studying Ancient Languages on Overall School Performance: Evidence from French Data (PDF, 2,1 Mo) Anthony KUYU under the direction of Clement de Chaisemartin , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po, ERC Project REALLYCREDIBLE, NBER Faculty Research Fellow , J-PAL Affiliated Professor.

Holes in the ceiling! Dividend elasticities and tax avoidance in light of the ceiling mechanism of the French wealth tax (PDF, 1,9 Mo) Elvin LE POUHAËR under the direction of Lucas Chancel , Associate Professor at Sciences Po.

Consequences of Colonial Rule on Health Outcomes in India (PDF, 1,2 Mo) Kunal PANDA under the direction of Emeric Henry , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po, ANR Project SOSELF, CEPR Research Fellow.

A good year to bury bad loans? Uncovering liquidity in the market for non-performing loans (PDF, 1.12 Mo) Nathaniel Butler Blondel under the direction of Guillaume Plantin , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po &  Maximilian Fandl of the Macroprudential Division at the European Central Bank

Mobility of French teachers in secondary education: modelisation and estimation of a dynamic centralised matching market (PDF, 1.37 Mo) Antoine Chapel under the direction of Jean-Marc Robin , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po & Alfred Galichon , Professor of Economics at New York University

The Drivers of Social and Individual Environmental Behaviour (PDF, 1.82 Mo) Sidonie Commarmond under the direction of Emeric Henry , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po & Roberto Galbiati , CNRS Professor (DR) at Sciences Po

Weighted Dynamic Latent Block Model and its Applications in Sorting Estimation (PDF, 1.55 Mo) Xinyu Dai under the direction of Jean-Marc Robin , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po & Junnan He, Assistant Professor of Economics at Sciences Po

Does school choice increase social segregation? Evidence from private schools opening in France between 2005 and 2019 (PDF, 2.95 Mo) Constance Frohly under the direction of Pierre Cahuc , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po & Denis FougÚre , Directeur de recherche CNRS-CRIS

Cost and benefit of green R&D: evidence from French firms (PDF, 1.10 Mo) Axel Meunier under the direction of Jean-Marc Robin , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po & AgnÚs Benassy-Quéré , Professor of Economics at Paris School of Economics

Campaign Finance Quotas and Female Political Representation: Evidence from 2018 Brazilian Reform  (PDF, 2.42 Mo) Olympia Tsoutsoplidi under the direction of Julia Cagé , Associate Professor & Benjamin Marx , Assistant Professor of Economics at Sciences Po

International inequality transmission in a two-country HANK model (PDF, 43 Mo) Naomi Cohen  under the direction of Xavier Ragot , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po

Job seeker's strategic attention allocation : Evidence from a Field Experiment (PDF, 315 ko) Mattis Gilbert  under the direction of Pierre Cahuc , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po

Women Empowerment through Public Employment Programmes: Evidence from Ethiopia (PDF, 2 Mo) Till Kadereit   under the direction of Benjamin Marx , Assistant Professor  of Economics at Sciences Po

Price discrimination with endogenous participation in two-sided platforms (PDF, 536 ko) Aurélien Salas under the direction of Eduardo Perez-Richet , Assistant Professor  of Economics at Sciences Po

The landscapes of transition: Identifying economic geography in the emergence of capitalist markets in Central and Eastern Europe (PDF, 2 Mo) Karolina WilczyƄska under the direction of Thierry Mayer , Professor of Economics at Sciences Po

Inequality and Current Account - Imbalances in a Monetary Union. Heterogeneous heterogeneities in the Eurozone (PDF, 11Mo) Danell Benguigui sous la direction de Xavier Ragot , Professeur d'Ă©conomie Ă  Sciences Po

Paris Terrorist Attacks and Hotel Word‐of‐Mouth (PDF, 497 ko) Yulin Hao sous la direction de MichĂšle Fioretti , Assistant Professor  au DĂ©partement d'Économie, Sciences Po

Political Trust, Political Participation and Conflict. A case study of the Boko Haram conflict in Nigeria (PDF, 2.71 Mo) Simeon Lauterbach sous la direction de Benjamin Marx , Assistant Professor  au DĂ©partement d'Économie, Sciences Po

Public debt and safety trap in open economies (PDF, 440 ko) Valentin Marchal sous la direction de  Nicolas Coeurdacier , Associate Professor of Economics at  Sciences Po

Global Migration and the Skill Premium (PDF, 346 ko) Alberto Nasi sous la direction de Thierry Mayer , Professeur d'Ă©conomie Ă  Sciences Po

Information design against petty corruption (PDF, 341ko) Grégory Dannay , sous la direction d' Eduardo Perez-Richet , Professeur d'économie à Sciences Po

What drives the French discontent? (PDF, 453 ko) Eva Davoine , sous la direction de Benjamin Marx , Assistant Professor  au DĂ©partement d'Économie, Sciences Po

Overtime Hours and Bonuses: A Story of Fiscal Optimization (PDF, 700ko) Nicolas Ghio , sous la direction de Pierre Cahuc , Professeur à Sciences Po &   Denis FougÚre , Directeur de recherche CNRS - OSC-LIEPP

Knocking on closed doors? Identifying the determinants of employer call-backs for unskilled youth (PDF, 1.20Mo) Lorenzo Kaaks, sous la direction de Pierre Cahuc , Professeur Ă  Sciences Po

Cracks in the boards: the opportunity cost of homogeneous boards of directors (PDF, 5.37Mo) HĂ©lĂšne Maghin , sous la direction de Ghazala Azmat , Professeur Ă  Sciences Po

Does Dark Trading Alter Liquidity? Evidence from European Regulation (PDF, 504ko) Victor Saint-Jean , sous la direction de StĂ©phane Guibaud , Assistant Professor  au DĂ©partement d'Économie, Sciences Po

The Relationship Between Housing Vouchers and Educational Attainment in Atlanta, GA (PDF, 396ko) Rebecca Smith , sous la direction de Ghazala Azmat , Professeur Ă  Sciences Po

Reading about Flood Risk in the News - Evidence from the Housing Market (PDF, 19Mo) Jeanne Sorin , sous la direction de Julia CagĂ© ,  Assistant Professor  au DĂ©partement d'Économie, Sciences Po &  Florian Oswald ,  Assistant Professor  au DĂ©partement d'Économie, Sciences Po 

Gravity in paradise - How do tax havens shape multinational production (PDF) Samuel Delpeuch sous la direction de Zsofia Barany , Assistant Professor au DĂ©partement d'Économie, Sciences Po et Thomas Chaney , Professeur d'Ă©conomie Ă  Sciences Po

Chasing the Flapper Vote Women Enfranchisement and Electoral Outcomes at the 1929 British General Election (PDF) Edgard Dewitte sous la direction de Julia CagĂ© , Assistant Professor au DĂ©partement d'Économie, Sciences Po

Savings in a 3 Period-Model with a Behavioral Agent - Rational inattention with a Sparse Dynamic Approach (PDF) Galo Egas G. sous la direction de Xavier Ragot , Professeur d'Ă©conomie Ă  Sciences Po

Quality of life in French cities (PDF) MylĂšne Feuillade sous la direction de Pierre-Philippe Combes , Professeur d'Ă©conomie Ă  Sciences Po et Laurent Gobillon , Professeur d'Ă©conomie Ă  Paris School of Economics

Non-Cognitive Skills Training and Educational Outcomes: New Evidence from French Middle Schools (PDF) Laura Green sous la direction de GREEN, Yann Algan , Doyen de l’École d’Affaires Publiques (EAP) et Professeur d’économie Ă  Sciences Po & Denis FougĂšre , Directeur de recherche CNRS - OSC-LIEPP

Dynamics of local employment in Europe: Is the impact of agglomeration economies time inconsistent?  (PDF) Magdalena Kizior sous la direction de Pierre-Henri Bono , Chef de projet au LIEPP & Département d'économie de Sciences Po, Jean Imbs , Directeur de recherche CNRS, Paris School of Economics

Learning under Coarse Thinking (PDF) Daniel M. de A. Barreto sous la direction de Eduardo Perez-Richet , Professeur d'Ă©conomie Ă  Sciences Po et Jeanne Hagenbach, Associate Professor d'Ă©conomie Ă  Sciences Po

Estimating employment effects of the German minimum wage (PDF) Johannes Seebauer sous la direction de Florian Oswald , Assistant Professor Ă  Sciences Po & Denis FougĂšre , Directeur de recherche CNRS - OSC-LIEPP

Present-Bias and Salience in Discounting Acros Short Durations: a Proposed Experimental Approach (PDF) Zydney Wong sous la direction de Jeanne Hagenbach, Associate Professor au DĂ©partement d'Économie, Sciences Po & Emeric Henry, Associate Professor au DĂ©partement d'Économie, Sciences Po

Academic year 2016-2017

Does training pay? Estimating the wage returns to vocational training in France (PDF)

Olivier Cassagneau-Francis sous la direction de Jean-Marc Robin , Professeur à Sciences Po et  Robert Gary-Bobo , Professeur à l'ENSAE

Competing Information Designers (PDF)

Théo Durandard  sous la direction d' Eduardo Perez-Richet , Professeur d'économie à Sciences Po

What's new in the new? Media coverage about the ECB and market participants'inflation expectations   (PDF)

Mikael Eskenazi  sous la direction de  Christine Graeff , directrice générale de la communication de la Banque centrale européenne et Benoit Coeuré , Membre du Directoire de la Banque centrale européenne

Impact of Trade on the Characteristics of the Digital Newspaper Market (PDF)

Anaïs Galdin  sous la direction de  Julia Cagé , Associate Professor of Economics à Sciences Po et Thomas Chaney , Professeur d'économie à Sciences Po

Intergenerational Income Mobility in France : National and Territorial Estimates (PDF)

Gustave Kenedi sous la direction de Pierre-Philippe Combes , Professeur d'Ă©conomie Ă  Sciences Po

Intergenerational transfert without commitment: a macroeconomic framework (PDF)

Hugo Lhuillier  sous la direction de  Nicolas Coeurdacier , Associate Professor of Economics at Sciences Po

Evaluation of the impact computer-aided instruction on student performence  (PDF)

Clémence Lobut  sous la direction de  Denis FougÚre , Directeur de recherche CNRS - OSC-LIEPP

Colonial Administrators and Public Educational - Investments in French West Africa   (PDF)

Christine Cai sous la direction de Quoc Anh DO , Associate Professor of Economics 

  Incumbency Effect and Partisanship in development: Evidence from close elections in India  (PDF)

Ragini Chaurasia, sous la direction de  Sergei Guriev , Professor of Economics

Were Administrators the "Rulers of the Empire"? An Empirical Investigation of the Determinants of Colonial Public Investments in French West Africa (PDF)

Par Sacha Dray, sous la direction d' Elise Huillery , Assistant Professor of Economics et Quoc-Anh Do,  Associate Professor of Economics 

Aspirations, Family Background and Educational Outcomes: Evidence of a Poverty Trap in Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam (PDF)

Ava Guez, sous la direction d' Elise Huillery , Assistant Professor of Economics

  Present and Future Costs of Education and International Students - Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Germany  (PDF)

Par Benoit Rauturier, sous la direction d' Etienne Wasmer , Full Professor of Economics

  The Consequences of Managerial Short-termism on the Firm : Theory and Empirics  (PDF)

Bilal Tabti, sous la direction de  Guillaume Plantin , Professor of Economics

Measuring the impact of the CICE on Firms' investments (PDF)

Camille Urvoy, sous la direction de Denis FougĂšre , Directeur de recherche CNRS - OSC-LIEPP

Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail? Immigration, Local Public Spending and Voting: Evidence from a Natural Experiment (PDF)

Max Viskanic, sous la direction d' Emeric Henry , Directeur des études doctorales en Economie, Professeur associé au Département d'Economie, Sciences Po

Heterogeneous Preferences and General Equilibrium in Financial Markets  (PDF) Tyler ABBOT, sous la direction de Nicolas COEURDACIER , Associate Professor of Economics

Returns to College on the Marriage Market: a Simple Roy Model with Perfect Foresight  (PDF)

Edoardo CISCATO, sous la direction de Jean-Marc ROBIN , Professor of Economics 

Social-Democracy. Homophily and polarisation in politics, the Italian Twitter network   (PDF) Mario LUCA, sous la direction de  Ruben DURANTE ,  Associate Professor of Economics

Population's fear and hostility and the Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa  (PDF) Norbert RUGAMBAGE, sous la direction d' Elise HUILERY , Associate Professor of Economics

Le Marché du Logement et l'Emploi des Jeunes  (PDF) Jean-Benoßt Eymeoud, sous la direction d' Etienne WASMER , Full Professor of Economics

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This thesis contains three chapters that fall under the broad banner of development economics, with a particular focus on the study of mechanisms and strategies that improve public goods delivery. The first chapter studies the role of financial incentives as signals of job attributes when these are unknown to potential applicants. I create experimental variation in expected earnings and use it to estimate the effect of financial incentives on candidates’ perception of a newly created health worker position in Uganda and, through this, on the size and composition of the applicant pool. I find that more lucrative positions are perceived as entailing a lower positive externality for the community, and discourage agents with strong prosocial preferences from applying. While higher financial incentives attract more applicants and increase the probability of filling a vacancy, they hamper retention and performance. This is because the signal they convey reduces the ability to recruit the most socially motivated agents, who are found to stay longer on the job and to perform better. The second chapter analyzes the role of social connections on the targeting choices of delivery agents. During the expansion of an agriculture extension program in Uganda, we randomly selected one delivery agent out of two eligible candidates per community. We find that social connections matter: relative to farmers connected only to the non-selected candidate, those connected only to the selected delivery agent benefit more from the program. They are indeed more likely to receive advice, training and more likely to adopt improved seeds, a new beneficial technology. We show that these results are consistent with delivery agents (a) putting positive weight on the utility of farmers connected to them (altruism) and (b) putting a negative weight on the utility of farmers connected to the rival candidate (spite). This sheds light on the importance of both positive and negative social preferences in shaping program delivery. The third chapter studies the effect of movement restrictions on education. The evidence is based on the construction of the West Bank Separation Barrier in 2003. The exposure of an individual to the Barrier is determined both by her locality of residence and by whether she was in school or about to start school when the Barrier was built. Using a difference-indifferences approach, I find that movement restrictions increase the probability of dropping out from elementary and preparatory school by 3.7 and 6 percentage points respectively, i.e. a 50% increase relative to localities with no movement restrictions, while the proportion of children who have never attended school increased by 3.6 percentage points. Among all households, the poorest ones are the most affected, indicating that movement restrictions not only deteriorate the average education level but also increase income inequality.

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master thesis development economics

Master Program in Development Economics and Sustainable Development

Pantheon-Sorbonne offers a two-year Master Program  with specialization on Development Economics and Sustainable Development . All courses are in English if you follow the PSME - Development Track in the first year. Or you can get courses both in French and English with the Master 1 Economie du Development. In the second year, you can choose between the Develpment Economics and the Sustainable Development track. We also offers mobility programs in prestigious universities in the Developing World and a specitif track at Cairo University.

Pantheon-Sorbonne University is the first French University in Development according to the Top Univ QS Ranking . Our Master Program is also the oldest diploma in Economic Development in France (founded by Gaston Leduc in the 1960's).

More information

Presentation of program, research and phd.

Download the Master's booklet with all details on our program, courses' syllabi and professors.

Diploma of excellence in economics

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In 1947 , Gaston Leduc was recruited at the Faculty of Law and Economics of Paris, first as a lecturer, then as a professor of international economics. He created and was director of the Centre d’étude du DĂ©veloppement and taught the Overseas Economics and Development Course. He created the first "DiplĂŽme d'Etudes approfondis" (corresponding to the current Master 2) specialized in Development issues in the fifties in France.

Today, Pantheon-Sorbonne University is the first French University in Development according to the Top Univ QS Ranking .

Gaston Leduc is known for being one of the founders of modern development economics. Amongst many other works he made the preface of the translation in French of the famous book of Arthur Lewis (The theory of economic growth).

The DEA has evolved over the years, with a focus on international economics and development. The director was the French economist Christian Morrisson.

In the nineties, it becomes the "DEA Economie Internationale, Développement et Transition" and then "Master Globalization and Development". Directors were succesively Jean-Pierre Laffargue and Jean-Claude Berthelemy. Both are now professors emeritus at Pantheon-Sorbonne University.   Jean-Pierre Lafargue is a specialist of macroeconomics, founder of the macroeconomic model "Marmotte", developed by the CEPII and CEPREMAP. He applies macroeconomic modeling and econometric methods to questions related to long run development, health and environment economics.

Jean-Claude Berthelemy has contributed in recent years to such topics as poverty traps, health and development and education and development. He has also written extensively on aid and development finance. He was Director of Research at the OECD and Director of the CEPII. He was also Dean of the Economics Department and founder of the Pantheon Sorbonne Master in Economics.

The Master was labelled "Development Economics" in the year 2000s and directed by Sandra Poncet, specialized in trade issues and China. The professional Master "Economie du DĂ©veloppement Durable" was created by Jean-Claude Berthelemy in 2016 with the support of the French development agency (AFD).

Remi Bazillier became director of the Master Development economics in 2016 and Laetitia Duva l director of the Master Economie du DĂ©veloppement Durable between 2017 and 2020. Lisa Chauvet is now director of the Master EDD.

master thesis development economics

Christian Morrisson Professeur Ă©mĂ©rite Ă  l’UniversitĂ© de Paris I, PanthĂ©on-Sorbonne

master thesis development economics

Jean-Pierre Lafargue Professeur Ă©mĂ©rite Ă  l’UniversitĂ© de Paris I, PanthĂ©on-Sorbonne

master thesis development economics

Jean-Claude Berthelemy Professeur Ă©mĂ©rite Ă  l’UniversitĂ© de Paris I, PanthĂ©on-Sorbonne

master thesis development economics

Remi Bazillier Director of the Master Development economics

master thesis development economics

Laetitia Duval Director of the Master Economie du DĂ©veloppement Durable

master thesis development economics

Lisa Chauvet Director of the Master EDD

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Pantheon Sorbonne Master Program in Development Economics

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master thesis development economics

Note to (1): A seminar may be considered passed before the end of the course if the majority of the work has been completed and only a final grade of 4.0 or better is mathematically possible. The examiner responsible for the seminar must have informed the Student Services about this separately before you send your e-mail to the Student Services.

Administrative Preparation, Step 2: E-mail to Your Supervisor

As soon as you have coordinated the topic and start date of your master's thesis with your supervisor, forward the reply from the Student Services from step 1 via your Mannheim e-mail account to your supervisor and precede it with the following text:  

"[Your greeting],

I, [first name] [last name], [matriculation number], would like to formally register my master's thesis with you. We agreed on the following topic:

[Title of the Masters's thesis]

I kindly ask you to confirm the topic, start date, and latest submission date by e-mail, with CC to the Student Services ([email protected]).

[Closing]"  

Please note that the processing time starts on the day this e-mail is sent. The processing time for master's theses is 23 weeks.

Confirmation by Your Supervisor

Your supervisor confirms to you via e-mail, with a copy to the Student Services, the topic of the master's thesis and the latest submission date (start date plus 23 weeks). If you believe there are discrepancies with the agreements made in the preliminary discussions, please contact your supervisor immediately.

Maybe: Return of the Topic

The master's thesis can be returned once and only within the first four weeks of the processing time to the responsible examiner. The examiner informs the Student Services of the return date. If returned in time, the examination attempt is considered not undertaken; otherwise, the examination persists.

In the case of a returned thesis, a new topic must be agreed upon. You can also choose a different examiner for this.

When repeating a failed master's thesis, the return of the topic is only permissible if this option was not used in the first examination attempt.

To return your topic, quote the entire e-mail sent to your supervisor in step 2 and send it again to them via your Mannheim e-mail account, preceding it with the following text:  

I hereby return the topic of my master's thesis [Title of the master's thesis in English] with the agreed start date [Date].

As you can see from the initial confirmation from the Student Services, I have not yet returned a master's thesis topic.

I kindly ask you to confirm the return of the topic by e-mail, with CC to the Student Services.

Maybe: Confirmation by Your Supervisor

Your supervisor confirms to you via e-mail, with a copy to the Student Services, the return of the topic. You now agree on a new topic and continue with the point Administrative Preparation, Step 2: E-mail to Your Supervisor. When selecting a new supervisor, you must include in your e-mail that you meanwhile returned the topic once; otherwise, it constitutes an attempt of deception.

Maybe: Request for an Extension of the Processing Time

In exceptional cases, the Examination Committee may grant an extension of up to four weeks for the submission of the master's thesis. The request for an extension must be submitted at least eight days before the deadline and must be approved by the supervisor of the master's thesis.

If you wish to request an extension of the processing time, please send your informal request with the specified extension period either as a signed pdf file via your Mannheim e-mail account to econgrad mail- uni-mannheim.de or in writing (i.e., on paper with an original signature) to the Examination Committee (Attn: Sebastian Herdtweck). If you are requesting an extension due to illness, please submit the original medical certificate to the Examination Committee.

The Examination Committee will inquire about the approval of your supervisor. You will receive an answer from the Examination Board regarding your request.

Postal address of the Examination Committee:

University of Mannheim Examination Committee M.Sc. Economics Attn: Sebastian Herdtweck L 7, 3–5, Room 405 68131 Mannheim

Submission of the Master's Thesis

The completed master's thesis is to be submitted to your supervisor no later than the specified (possibly extended) submission deadline in duplicate form as two paper copies. The submission deadline can be met by delivery to a post office, documented by certificate of posting. Please coordinate with your supervisor regarding submission in good time. He/ she can appoint a substitute to receive the thesis, but this must be arranged transparently for all parties involved in advance. The uncoordinated delivery of the master's thesis to a different location than previously designated does not fulfill the requirements of the examination regulations.

The examiner may also require submission in electronic form.

Neither the student nor the examiner is required to notify the Student Services of the timely submission of the master's thesis. However, the examiner shall promptly inform the Student Services of any failure to submit the thesis on time and the resulting grade of 5.0 in accordance with the examination regulations.

If you have not passed your master's thesis and still have a second attempt available, please proceed with Step 1 of the Administrative Preparation.

  • Extension master's thesis ( PDF , 233 KB )

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Topics for master's theses

Topics for master's theses.

The Department of Economics would like to present the following ideas for topics:

  • Department of Economics
  • MSC in Economics and Business Administration
  • Master's thesis
  • Apply for master's thesis supervisor

Behavioural Economics

Do you feel lucky, punk.

Background:

High-achieving persons often attribute part of their success to luck – that is, exogenous events outside their own control. Random events have been shown to play a decisive role in shaping people’s life trajectories. However, people may also differ in what they infer from the same objective outcome, which could have repercussions for their long-term financial success. In this master thesis, students will get the chance to conduct an economic experiment to shed light out on why some people feel lucky: is it because they are overly optimistic about the frequency of lucky events, or because they neglect unlucky events? The thesis will then explore how these personal traits correlate with basic economic preferences, personal characteristics, and real investment behavior.

Key references: 

Kaufman (2018), “The Role of Luck in Life Success Is Far Greater Than We Realized”, Scientific American

Profile: ECN, ECO, BUS, FIN, STR

Supervisor: Mathias Ekström

Paying with money or paying with personal data

During the last years concerns have been raised regarding the business model of several tech companies, which base their revenues on advertisements from third parties in exchange of customers’ personal data. From a consumers’ perspective, an important question behind this growing debate is how to quantify a price on personal data. Do consumers attach the same value to their personal data as they do to money? Is it even possible to put a price on your personal data? Previous literature has found a mismatch between willingness to pay (WTP) and willingness to accept (WTA) the sharing of personal information, but understanding behind this gap has not been fully explored. This master thesis project should conduct experiments to study a trade-off between paying with money and paying with personal data. In particular, it should explore potential explanations that could explain the mismatch between WTP and WTA of privacy.

Key references:

Acquisti, Alessandro, Leslie K. John, and George Loewenstein (2013). “What is privacy worth?.” The Journal of Legal Studies 42.2, 249-274.

Winegar, A. G. and C. R. Sunstein (2019). “How much is data privacy worth? A preliminary investigation.” Journal of Consumer Policy 42(3), 425–440.

Brynjolfsson, E. and Collis, A. (2019). “How Should We Measure the Digital Economy?”

Harvard Business Review, 97(6): 140-48. doi: 10.1257/aer.20170491

Collect your own data either by conducting an experiment on the online labor market Amazon Mechanical Turk or by doing a survey experiment.

Supervisors: Researchers from FAIR and Telenor Research.

UNDERSTANDING PATERNALISM

The extent to which it is acceptable to restrict the freedom of individuals in order to promote their own best interest is at the core of much political debate about the relationship between the state and its citizens: Should the state institute mandatory retirement savings, require motorcyclists to wear helmets or refuse to enforce certain types of contracts? Questions about the legitimate role of paternalism are also important in many interpersonal relationships, in particular between parents and their children, and people’s views on these matters may be of great importance for understanding their willingness to accept inequality in society. The master thesis project should conduct experiments to study a person’s willingness to reduce another individual’s freedom in order to promote that individual’s best interests. For example by studying how the willingness to act paternalistically depends on the characteristics of the individuals whose freedom is being restricted, such as how well informed they are, their competence, and their age.

Julian Le Grand & Bill New (2015): Government Paternalism: Nanny State or Helpful Friend? Princeton University Press, 2015

Suitable for profiles:   ECO, ECN, STR, INB, ENE

Supervisor: Alexander W. Cappelen

THE DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIAL PREFERENCES: EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FROM INTERNATIONAL PILOTS

We are seeking master students who would like to write their master thesis as part of a project on the development of fairness preferences. The project is a collaboration between FAIR professors Alexander W. Cappelen and Bertil Tungodden.

We have recruited children from kindergartens and schools in Bergen to take part in a lab experiment we are implementing in September 2018. We have also collected comparable data for adults from Norway and Shanghai as well as for children from kindergartens and schools in Shanghai.

Almås, Cappelen, Sørensen and Tungodden (2010): “Fairness and the Development of Inequality Acceptance”, Science 328(5982): 1176–1178. (2) Almås, Cappelen, Salvanes, Sørensen and Tungodden (2017): “Fairness and family background”, Philosophy, Politics and Economics 16(2) 117-131. (3) Cappelen, List, Samek and Tungodden (2016): “The Effect of Early Education on Social Preferences”, NBER Working Paper No. 22898.

Suitable for:

NHH master students who are interested in helping to implement pilot experiments internationally during the fall and in writing their master thesis as part of the project are welcome to send an e-mail to Adriana Condarco-Quesada. It should include your name, your CV and a short note on why you would like to write your master thesis on this subject. Please also send any questions you might have regarding the project to Adriana.

Supervisor:   Bertil Tungodden

The role of the telco industry towards screen addiction

In the context of conducting fair business practices, a relevant question in the telecommunication industry is whether telco companies should allow and push for unlimited internet data usage. The particular issue at stake is whether providing unlimited data package would push consumers into increasing their social media use and their phone in general, and consequently increasing screen addiction. Telco companies obviously gain by costumers using more their phones. However, this issue raises ethical considerations regarding overdose and potential addiction consequences, which may eventually backfire on the companies’ long term profitability. The master thesis project should conduct experiments or surveys to gather information about people’s perspective on the role of telco companies towards screen use. In particular, it should focus on understanding the view on companies’ interventions when the consumer lacks the will power and/or intrinsic motivation to reduce his/her data consumption.

Alter, A. (2017). “Irresistible: The rise of addictive technology and the business of keeping us hooked”. Penguin.

Supervisors:  Researchers from  FAIR and Telenor Research.

WHAT DRIVES CONSUMERS TO CHANGE ELECTRICITY PROVIDER?

In markets characterized by subscription services, such as electricity, banking and telecommunications, we often find that consumers change providers or plans to a very low extent despite considerable price differences between seemingly similar (or even homogenous) products. There are many potential explanations for this phenomenon, e.g., lack of information, costs of switching, and strong preferences for particular providers. Understanding the sources of passive consumer behavior is important for both regulation, business planning, government policy and market design. We find clear signs of consumer passivity also in the Norwegian electricity retail market, and data sources available to this supervisor can allow a talented student to shed light on some of the potential channels.

von der Fehr and Hansen (2010): "Electricity Retailing in Norway", The Energy Journal 31: 25-45 (Basic reference); Hortacsu et al (2015): "Power to Choose? An Analysis of Consumer Inertia in the Residential Electricity Market", NBER Working Paper No. 20988 (Advanced reference)

Data:  Monthly data on number of subscriptions and sales (kWh) for the largest retailers within local areas will be provided by the supervisor, as well as weekly contract prices and monthly visitor statistics for the contract comparison website of the Competition Authority. Wholesale electricity prices and other useful market statistics can be gathered from Nordpool.

Suitable for profiles:  ECO, ECN, ENE, BUS, FIE, INB

Supervisor:   Morten Sæthre

Energy efficiency and electricity consumption: Drivers of green technology adoption

(Note: Theses under this topic can be eligible for an  Equinor scholarship for master theses .)

Description:

Assessments of potential savings from energy efficiency investments have suggested the existence of an "Energy Efficiency Gap"; that consumers do not undertake energy efficiency investments with even large positive returns. Though the conclusion has been hotly debated in the academic literature, we still lack a solid understanding of drivers and barriers to energy efficiency adoption, which is necessary for designing appropriate policies. Currently, most countries employ some combination of regulation and subsidies to increase energy efficiency, e.g., 100-300 mNOK in yearly Enova subsidies for households in Norway.

Under this topic, you will contribute to our understanding of green technology adoption under the supervision of one or more experienced researchers with competences targeted to different approaches and research questions. Examples of specific projects are "Inattention and green technology: Do temporary shocks to electricity prices spur adoption?", "Does increased electricity demand lead to energy efficiency investment: Evidence from electric vehicle take-up", and "Are green technology subsidies regressive?", "Constrained wallets or constrained minds: The role of mental budgeting and relative thinking in green technology investment", or "Green loans vs investment subsidies: The optimal mix". The examples are far from an exhaustive list, and we encourage you to contact us if you could see yourself writing your master thesis within this topic and want to learn more.

Hunt Allcott and Michael Greenstone (2012) "Is There an Energy Efficiency Gap", Journal of Economic Perspectives 26, pp. 3-28

Hunt Allcott (2016) "Paternalism and Energy Efficiency: An Overview", Annual Review of Economics 8, pp. 145-176

Anna Sahari (2019) "Electricity prices and consumers' long-term technology choices: Evidence from heating investments", European Economic Review 114, pp. 19-53

Electricity prices and consumption data from Nordpool and Statistics Norway, Enova subsidies, statistics on sales of efficient heating systems. It might be possible to gain access to household data given availability and project needs.

Suitable for profiles:  BUS, ECN, ECO, ENE, FIN

(Tentative) supervisor:  Samuel D. Hirshman , Harim Kim,  Eirik G. Kristiansen ,  Mateusz Mysliwski  and/or  Morten Sæthre

Development Economics

Bulk buying and poverty.

Buying in bulk is a common way that consumers use to obtain lower prices on their purchases. There is now some evidence that low income consumers are not exploiting this strategy well, despite the large potential gains. The thesis will review the issue, and use an innovative detailed dataset from India to investigate it in a new setting.

Key References:

Brian Dillon, Joachim De Weerdt, Ted O’Donoghue, Paying More for Less: Why Don’t Households in Tanzania Take Advantage of Bulk Discounts?, The World Bank Economic Review , Volume 35, Issue 1, February 2021, Pages 148–179.

Suitable for profiles:  ECN, ECO

Supervisor:  Vincent Somville

High Frequency Poverty

Poverty is typically measured at annual level. High frequency data reveals that potentially many households cross the poverty line for significant periods even if they are not poor on average on an annual basis. The thesis will investigate transitory poverty using weekly financial diaries from India.

Jonathan Morduch. Rethinking Poverty, Household Finance, and Microfinance. Forthcoming in Handbook of Microfinance, Financial Inclusion, and Development, edited by Robert Cull and Valentina Hartarska. Forthcoming.

Supervisor: Bertil Tungodden

What effect daugthers have, globally?

There is some evidence from western countries that fathering daughters changes men’s attitudes towards women in general, and can also affect the household structure.

The students will use a global data base covering dozens of countries to investigate the global effects of daughters, and how they affect the economics of families.

Washington, Ebonya L. 2008. "Female Socialization: How Daughters Affect Their Legislator Fathers." American Economic Review , 98 (1): 311-32 .

Jan Kabátek, David C Ribar, Daughters and Divorce, The Economic Journal , Volume 131, Issue 637, July 2021, Pages 2144–2170.

Economic History

Bergen as a maritime capital.

The Norwegian consultancy group Menon publishes an annual list of “The leading maritime capitals of the world”. Bergen is not included in the list of 15 cities evaluated in the report, but has been included in a longlist of 30 nominated cities that are benchmarked according to a set of 24 indicators. The aim of the thesis would be to analyze a) the basis for the ranking; and b) measures that would make Bergen a leading maritime capital.

Key literature: Menon report

Data: developed together with the supervisor

Suitable for profiles: STR, INB, BUS

Supervisor: Stig Tenold

BERGEN AS A MARITIME SERVICE PROVIDER

Bergen plays a key role as one of the leading maritime cities internationally. Bergen shipping companies have dominant positions in several markets (chemical tanker transport, open hatch bulk shipping), and there are also world-class companies in auxiliary services (in particular ship finance, insurance, ship registry). Combining historical perspectives and economic theory, the aim of the thesis would be to analyze to which extent the success of these auxiliary services is based on linkages to the local industry, and to which extent it is a result of the international orientation of the service providers themselves.

Data: Veritas, surveys developed together with the supervisor

Innovation and the patent system

Intellectual property rights are usually associated with the patent system – patents and patent laws. The relationship between patents and innovations has been studied extensively, for example how patent laws create incentives to invent, promote innovation and encourage economic growth. Historical or modern data analysis do, however, give no clear answers, and there is a potential for research that addresses several questions: Does the existence of strong patent laws encourage innovation?  What proportion of innovations is patented? Is this share constant across industries? How does patenting and licensing affect the diffusion of knowledge? Such questions have only to a limited extent been studied in a Norwegian context.

Key reference:

P. Moser, ‘Patents and Innovation: Evidence from Economic History’, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Vol. 27 (1), 2013.

Patent and innovation statistics from the Norwegian Research Council (NFR) and Patentstyret. Norwegian policy documents, company annual reports.

Suitable for profiles: ECO, ECN, STR, INB, BUS

Supervisor: Bjørn L. Basberg

The gender wage gap

How large is the gender wage gap and why do we observe a gender wage gap. These are important questions that occupy economists, business operations and politicians. Students can address this question empirically by documenting the gender wage gap with international data (e.g. OECD, Eurostat, ILO) or national data sets. An interesting focus is to look at young adults or young adults in the NEET (not in education and employment) group.  It could be interesting to compare the measure across data sources and discuss differences and explanations.

There is also a new data source made available for research for young adults in developing countries which could be explored in this thesis (see Bandiera et al. (2022). Other macro-data sources that could be explored and compared across countries, demographic groups and time are found on the webpages of the OECD, Eurostat and ILO. Students could also use historical data for a thesis on this topic.

Key References: 

Bandiera, Oriana, Ahmed Elsayed, Andrea Smurra, and Céline Zipfel. 2022. "Young Adults and Labor Markets in Africa."  Journal of Economic Perspectives , 36 (1): 81-100.

Kunze, A. (2018). The gender wage gap in developed countries.  The Oxford handbook of women and the economy , 369-394.

Fields: economics, labour markets, developing countries, developed countries, empirical, econometrics

Profile: ECON

Supervisor: Astrid Kunze

Environmental & Resource Economics

Climate change in the arctic and economic activities.

The climate change is evident in the Arctic in the way of increased temperatures, decreasing ice and consequently increased accessibility. Maritime transport, fisheries and resource exploitation (mineral oil in particular) are industries that already are pushing the frontiers further north. Since the Arctic Ocean is surrounded by several national states (Canada, the United States, Russia, Norway and Denmark / Greenland), the political tension in the region has increased in a classic ‘race for property rights’ that has historic parallels. Other non-Arctic nations, China in particular, shows increased interest in the region.

There are many potential issues and questions that could be analyzed in an economic framework. What have been the recent trends, and how do businesses and stakeholders view the future? How does the government-business interaction play out in different countries involved? The climate change involves changes in both costs and benefits. How could this be modelled and analyzed?

A.S. Crépin et.al., ‘Arctic Climate Change, Economy and Society (ACCESS): Integrated Perspectives’, Ambio, Dec. (46) 2017, 341-354 and G. Eskeland and L.S. Flottorp, ‘Climate Change in the Arctic: A Discussion of the Impact on Economic Activity’, in Glomsrød et.al. (eds.), The Economy of the North, SSB, 2006.

Data: Climate change reports, government papers and statistics, business prospects.

Suitable for profiles: ECN, STR, INB, BUS.

COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES IN THE ANTARCTIC REGION

The Antarctic region has a long history of resource exploitation (sealing, whaling). Today, human activity in the region is dominated by science, but there are also industries like fisheries, tourism and bio-prospecting. Such industries have to a small extent been analyzed in an economic context and several questions are interesting to pursue. What is the economic scale of these operations? What is the economic and financial importance for the companies involved? Are management and regulatory systems sufficient?

B.L. Basberg, ‘Perspectives on the Economic History of the Antarctic Region’, International Journal of Maritime History, VO. XVIII (2), 2006,

Data: Economics and business statistics on tourism from the International Association of Antarctic Tour Operators (IAATO) and on fisheries from the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR).

ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVES ON TOURISM IN THE POLAR REGIONS

Polar tourism, especially ship born cruise tourism both in the Arctic and in the Antarctic has increased for many years. Business prospects and plans seem to indicate that this will continue.

There are, however, serious challenges ahead. The climate change involves increased accessibility, but also alters the unique experience that constitutes the rationale for the industry. Concerns about long travels is also a factor that creates uncertainties about future demand for such travels.

Several questions could be analyzed about this industry in an economic context. Is it possible, within a traditional business model, to create an environmental and social sustainable industry? There seems to be large future uncertainties connected both to the supply and the demand side in this market. How could that be modelled and analyzed?

M. Lamers and B. Amelung, ‘Climate Change and its Impact for Cruise Tourism’ in M. Lück et. al. (eds), Cruise Tourism in Polar Regions. Promoting Environmental and Social Sustainability? London 2010, p. 147-165.

Data:  Climate change reports, statistics and reports from the International Association of Antarctic Tour Operators (IAATO), tour operator plans and annual reports.

Suitable for profiles: ECN, STR, INB, BUS

Reflections of climate change: suffering and regret

With increasing consumption and production of many goods and services, the humanmade effects on climate change are getting bigger and bigger. For some activities the potential effects are well-known, such as plastic taking at least 400 years to dissolve completely in the nature. For some other activities the effects can be ambiguous and unknown to the consumers, such as the impact of an e-mail box size on the environment. When there is ambiguity about the consequences of their actions, people may suffer from both the direct effects of climate change and the regret from contributing this. The master thesis project should investigate regret and regret aversion when making decisions have potential consequences for the climate. Treatment variation could be driven by using manipulated regret lotteries for consumption (or digital) decisions.

Imas, A., Lam´e, D., Wilson, A. J. (2020). Reversals between one-shot and repeated decisions in incentive design: the case of regret. Mimeo

Robinson, P. J., Botzen, W. J. (2018). The impact of regret and worry on the threshold level of concern for flood insurance demand: Evidence from Dutch homeowners. Judgment and Decision Making , 13(3), 237-245.

Volpp, K. G., John, L. K., Troxel, A. B., Norton, L., Fassbender, J., Loewenstein, G.

(2008). Financial incentive–based approaches for weight loss: a randomized trial. Jama , 300(22), 2631-2637.

Zeelenberg, M., Pieters, R. (2007). A theory of regret regulation 1.0. Journal of Consumer Psychology , 17(1), 3-18.

Collect your own data either through a survey experiment or by conducting an online experiment on a crowdsourcing platform.

Firms & Ethics

Diversity in firms, top leadership, financial and technology sector.

Societies and firms increasingly become diverse in terms of gender, sexual orientation, ethnic background, language background, age. Gender imbalances are particularly pronounced when we look at top leadership, but also sectors such as the financial and technology sector. But the goal of firms of increasing diversity is not restricted to gender balance, but also other demographic characteristics such as age, ethnic background etc.

Equality is high on the political agenda and more and more firms acknowledge that in order to recruit the best workers they need to make diversity and inclusive worklife part of their strategic goals. Firms increasingly integrate gender equality and business ethics as part of their corporate management strategy.

A masterthesis in this area can be an empirical thesis where students assemble or collect novel data that allow to measure diversity in firms and policies that firms design to increase diversity. Students could measure corporate social responsibility along various dimensions and investigate whether such policies do lead to improved firm performance. Students could also study in their thesis more conceptually why firms care about diversity.

Depending on the study profile of the student this thesis can focus on financial outcomes, socio-economic outcomes, careers or theory and empirical methods.

SNF database merged with other data (for Norway)

Orbis database (for international study)

Suitable for profiles: ECON, STR, BUS, FIN

Do business organisations in Europe use diversity and inclusive worklife policies?

I am looking for master's students who collect data from business organisations in Europe, a sample or as many as possible,  to measure whether business organisations D&I policies (e.g. a webpage) and what policies they have. This thesis can take different forms depending on the interests and skills of the students. The thesis could take a focus on the discussion what D&I are, how to categorize those and then how to measure the outcomes of interest. The collection of the data demands a plan how to collect these data (manually from webpages, scaping, or other methods). The thesis may have the design of the data collection as the main part, hand-collection of data or developing an algorithm. Students may also use the plan if there is time to collect a small sample. The most ambitious plan is to collect a large sample that may be merged with other data. If the latter part is the main part, the literature overview of D&I and the more conceptual discussion may be shorter. Instead there could be some empirical descriptive analysis part of the thesis. This thesis leaves a lot of space for the students to find their own focus matching with their interests.

References:

Hospido, L., Laeven, L., & Lamo, A. (2019). The gender promotion gap: evidence from central banking.  The Review of Economics and Statistics , 1-45.

Kalev, A., Dobbin, F., & Kelly, E. (2006). Best practices or best guesses? Assessing the efficacy of corporate affirmative action and diversity policies.  American sociological review ,  71 (4), 589-617.

Fields: organisations, labour markets, equality, diversity in firms, empirical

Profiles: ECON, STR, FOR

Do universities in Europe have diversity and inclusive worklife policies

I am looking for master's students who collect data from universities in Europe, a sample or as many as possible,  to measure whether universities and economic faculties in Europe have D&I policies (e.g. a webpage) and what policies they have. This thesis can take different forms depending on the interests and skills of the students. The thesis could take a focus on the discussion what D&I are, how to categorize those and then how to measure the outcomes of interest. The collection of the data demands a plan how to collect these data (manually from webpages, scaping, or other methods). The thesis may have the design of the data collection as the main part. Students may also use the plan if there is time to collect a small sample. The most ambitious plan is to collect a large sample  that may be merged with other data on representation of women among Professors in Economics. If the latter part is the main part, the literature overview of D&I and the more conceptual discussion may be shorter. Students could collect data on universities overall, or focus on departments of Economics, or Engineering or other fields. This thesis leaves a lot of space for the students to find their own focus matching with their interests.

Auriol, E., Friebel, G., Weinberger, A., & Wilhelm, S. (2022). Underrepresentation of women in the economics profession more pronounced in the United States compared to heterogeneous Europe.  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ,  119 (16), e2118853119.

Profiles : ECON, STR, FOR

Supervisor : Astrid Kunze

Firm behaviour, recruitment and personnel policies

I am looking for masterstudents who are interested to work together with a firm and evaluate certain firm policies and personnel data. The thesis may require designing a survey, preparing confidential data, analysing data collected by the firm. Topics may be on performance evaluation, recruitment, careers, firm performance, accounting. The students could also come with their own ideas.

If students have interest or an idea please get in touch early in the process of planning the masterthesis.

Data: They will be prepared together with the supervisor.

Suitable for profiles:  ECON, BUS, ECN, FIN, STR

Supervisor:   Astrid Kunze

Who should get internet?

Background: 

Access to broadband internet has been found to increase employment and wages, labour productivity, financial technology and banking, education, among other things. A question that still needs to be answered is how to evaluate the expansion of broadband internet in developed countries, where penetration rates are already very high. For example, in Norway 11% of the population does still not have access to internet broadband. A recent public debate has raised the issue on whether the Norwegian government should step in and extend the coverage to the entire population. The master thesis project should investigate people’s perspectives on broadband expansion in Norway. It should, for example, elicit the willingness to pay for (fast) broadband and evaluate different scenarios in a cost and benefit analysis of a potential public investment. Moreover, based on previous evidence that connectivity can enable higher economic productivity, the project could explore whether resources for the broadband expansion should be allocated to all the uncovered areas or whether they should only focus on the most productive areas with more growth potential.

Akerman, Anders, Ingvil Gaarder, and Magne Mogstad (2015). ”The skill complementarity of broadband internet.” The Quarterly Journal of Economics 130.4 : 1781-1824.

M. Bhuller, T. Havnes, E. Leuven and M. Mogstad (2013). “Broadband Internet: An Information Superhighway to Sex Crime?” Review of Economic Studies , 80, 1237-1266.

International Trade & Globalization

How are global value chains affected by the pandemic and recent geopolitical events.

An important aspect of the trends towards more globalisation since the turn of the century, has been the increasing importance of ever more complex (global) supply chains in many industries. The unprecedented technological development in information and communication technology (ICT), combined with more integrated markets and reduced transportation and transaction costs, have made it both technically feasible and economically profitable to split the production process and produce parts and components in various parts of the world. This is often called global value chains (GVC).

From the beginning of the corona pandemic, spring 2020, it became clear that many of these supply chains are very vulnerable to market disruptions, be it in production in various regions or in transportation and international infrastructure. Supply shortages and long delivery times for key components and products have had a significant negative impact on firms and industries in all parts of the world, and many firms have had to reconsider their global value chains.

The present geopolitical situation adds to the pressure on supply chains and exposes the vulnerability of relying on certain sources of raw material and key parts and components in various industries.

Possible approaches:

Given the general picture above, several master thesis topics are possible, depending on the interests of the students. Here are some suggestions:

  • Choose an industry (or a firm) and study how the global supply chains in that industry developed before the pandemic and how they have changed recently.  Assess how the pandemic and the geopolitical situation have affected the situation and what the future development might be.
  • Choose several industries and compare their development over time both before and during the pandemic.  
  • There could also be room for a more theoretical thesis, perhaps with examples from various industries, in which the basis for growing GVC-trade over a long period is analysed, followed by a discussion of why and how the recent events have had such a negative impact in GVCs, and what the future development may be. 

Possible majors:   ECN, ECO, BUS, STR (depending on the focus of the thesis)

Possible supervisors:   Linda Orvedal , Jan I. Haaland or other faculty members from the Department of Economics

How will BREXIT and the new trade agreements affect Norway and Norwegian industry?

The UK decision to leave the EU (BREXIT) will have implications not only for the UK and the EU, but also for other countries.  After a long period of debate and negotiations, the UK and the EU agreed on the new “Trade and Cooperation Agreement” on the 24 th December 2020.  The agreement has been in place since 1 st January 2021, although parts of it is still debated.  In June 2021 Norway, together with the other EEA countries (Iceland and Liechtenstein), agreed on a free-trade agreement with the UK.

Both the Trade and Cooperation Agreement between the UK and the EU and the new free-trade agreement between the UK and the EEA countries will have profound implications for trade between the UK and Norway, for many reasons.  First, the UK is an important trading partner for Norway, for goods and services, as well as when it comes to investments and mobility of labour.  All of this have been affected by Brexit, even if new agreements are in place. Secondly, through the European Economic Area (EEA) Norway is part of the EU single market, but not part of the EU Customs Union. Hence, the UK’s departure from the EU customs union will have implications for Norway’s trade both with the EU and the UK.  And thirdly, Brexit has initiated a new discussion about the EEA (EØS) agreement in Norway; hence the implications may be even more serious. 

Approach:  

There could be many interesting ways of approaching the question of how BREXIT may affect Norway and Norwegian industry. One approach could be to take a general national view and discuss possible implications of BREXIT and the new trade agreements for overall trade and economic interactions between the UK and Norway. Another approach could be to select a particular industry and study the possible implications for that industry. And a third option could be to focus on the implications of a possible future change in the trade relations between the EU and Norway. All three approaches would need a good combination of theoretical understanding of trade agreements and possible future trade regimes, and empirical observations and analysis of the actual trade relations between the two countries.

Standard international economics textbooks for the understanding of trade policies and trade agreements.  www.wto.org for more specific information about the multilateral trade system and regional trade agreements. For BREXIT the literature is evolving constantly.  A good source is UK Trade Policy Observatory ( https://blogs.sussex.ac.uk/uktpo/ ) with many blogs and reports on recent developments.  When it comes to the new trade agreement between Norway and the UK, there are so far few independent analyses of possible consequences, but official information about the agreement is given on the governments’ webpages: Norwegian Government: https://www.regjeringen.no/no/aktuelt/inngar-historisk-frihandelsavtale-med-storbritannia/id2857147/   UK Government’s: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/united-kingdom-signs-free-trade-deal-with-norway-iceland-and-liechtenstein

Data: Industrial characteristics and trade data.

Possible majors: ECN, INB

Possible supervisors: Jan I. Haaland and Linda Orvedal

Sustainability and global value chains

The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) cover a number of areas of great importance for both national and multinational companies, and many companies use the SDGs both in their strategies and in marketing as something they will contribute to.  Areas like decent work and economic growth (SDG8), industry, innovation and infrastructure (SDG9), responsible consumption and production (SDG12), climate action (SDG13) all have direct links to companies, but the same is true for most of the SDGs. For some key areas, like human rights and labour conditions, there are also more specific international agreements and rules that companies are obliged to adhere to.

A key feature of international business today, is the reliance on global value chains (GVC for short, also called global supply chains), where the final products are made up of parts and components produced by a number of suppliers and sub-suppliers in different parts of the world.  Some of these GVCs are very complex, and it is not easy for the companies to keep track of the whole supply chain.  Yet, the companies’ responsibility to adhere to national and international rules, as well as their commitment to contribute to the SDGs, cover not only their own parts of the production process, but the whole supply chain.

How do multinationals go about to keep track of their GVC and to ensure that their obligations and commitments to e.g. human rights, labour conditions and/or environment issues are fulfilled throughout the supply chain?

There could be several approaches to this research question, depending on the students’ interest.  One possibility is to choose an industry or a firm and try to map the situation for that industry/firm.   Another possibility could be to start out with international rules and regulations in one or a few areas (e.g. human rights, or climate emissions) and to study how various industries relate to the regulations and how this affects their global value chains.   

Possible majors:   ECN, ENE, BUS, STR (depending on approach)

The war in Ukraine – implications for key markets in Europe and globally

The Russian invasion of Ukraine in February 2022 has affected the European and world economy in many ways. Energy and food markets have been disrupted with huge implications for both Europe and the rest of the world, but other markets have also seen significant changes due to the war. The market implications follow directly from the fact that the war prevents Ukraine from producing and exporting many products, as well as from the economic sanctions towards Russia and the Russian reactions.  Although the immediate and short-term effects have been huge, it is still too early to say what the longer-term effects may be.

Two possible approaches: 

  • Choose an industry/product, study how the war has affected the international markets for that industry so far, and try to assess how the future development may be.
  • Look at the broader picture and assess how various international markets have been affected and what the future development may by. 

Possible majors:   ECN, ECO, ENE (depending on approach)

Labour Economics

Do flexible pay schemes explain the rise of wage inequality.

In most developed countries, wage inequality has increased in the last decades. A popular explanation is that it is increasingly common to have pay set at the worker rather than at the sectoral level. This leaves more room for wage negotiations, potentially driving labor market inequality. This master thesis aims to assess the role of flexible pay setting in developing wage inequality using unique data on workers’ pay components (e.g., overtime, bonuses). You will have access to microdata for 25 European countries (SES data) to implement your analysis. 

Lemieux, Thomas, MacLeod, W Bentley and Parent, Daniel. 2009. "Performance Pay and Wage Inequality" The Quarterly Journal of Economics , 124 (1): 1-49.

Profile:  ECON

Supervisor: Antoine Bertheau

GENDER DIFFERENCES IN LABOUR MARKETS

Despite the fact that great gender convergence in employment is observed in labour markets, large gender differences remain. Women earn 16 per cent on average less in terms of hourly wages than men in the EU. Women also work in very different occupation and industries than men. True, if we compare men and women in the same job and in the same firm, we find very small wage differences; however, very few men and women work in the same job in the same firm. There are many more differences in labour markets between men and women which invites to important research questions suitable for a masterthesis. You could look for questions related to graduates in economics and business administration (use data from NHH. e.g.). You could study questions at the national level for Norway or another country, or internationally. International evidence is very important to learn and valuable to your career if you work, for example, in a company that does trade with EU and the world. Germany is a country important to learn about, since it is one of the main trading partners of Norway, followed by the UK etc.

•   SIAB (German register data, employer-employee matched panel, 1975-2015

•   SOEP (Socio Economic Panel for Germany, 1984-2016)

  • Mikrodata.no at NSD provides access to the Norwegian register data

•    NHH annual graduate survey

Suitable for profiles:  ECN, FIN, STR

HOW DID THE INTERNET CHANGE THE CHANNELS OF JOB SEARCH?

People that search for a job have several options to find it: read newspapers, go to employment agencies, browse the web and mobilize their local networks of friends and relatives. Networking has increasingly become important for job search. Social networks are an important source of information in the labor market and many workers find jobs through friends and relatives. On the other hand, an increasing number of people use the Internet to look for new jobs. One reason online job search has become so popular is that it has changed the search process considerably. Employment websites allow job seekers to access thousands of job offers and use intelligent filter mechanisms to find suitable vacancies.

Key references: Kuhn, P. J. and M. Skuterud (2004): “Internet Job Search and Unemployment Durations," The American Economic Review, 94, 218-232.

Data: Norwegian Labor Force Survey

Suitable for profiles:   ECO, ECN, STR, INB, BUS

Supervisor: Aline Bütikofer

Human capital, apprenticeship training, aspirations to success, early career, youth unemployment and youth labour markets

Some research has debunked the argument that job-hopping can propel a person onward and upward more rapidly than would be possible by staying in one place. In this thesis students can study and quantify mobility during the early career after first entry into the labaour market and after completion of education.  How do high achievers perform during the early career who eventually will fill top positions. Students could also analyse how women versus men’s early career looks like. Is it important to be mobile, or how long is it optimal to stay in the first job?

The thesis can focus more on firms and careers and strategic human capital or take a more labour economics and empirical methods direction.

See an example of a paper here:

Bonet, R., Cappeli, P.,  Hamori, M.  (2020). “Gender differences in speed of advancement: an empirical examination of top executives in the fortune 100 firms”.  Strategic Management Journal , Vol. 41 (4): 708-737

This project requires individual panel data on employment and wage histories.

•  SIAB (German register data, employer-employee matched panel, 1975-2015)

•  SOEP (Socio Economic Panel for Germany, 1984-2016)

•  Mikrodata.no at NSD provides access to the Norwegian register data

Suitable for profiles: ECON, BUS, ECN, FIN, STR

Labour markets, gender differences and family policy

Despite the fact that great gender convergence in employment is observed in labour markets, large gender differences remain. Women earn 16 per cent on average less in terms of hourly wages than men in the EU. Women also work in very different occupation and industries than men. True, if we compare men and women in the same job and in the same firm, we find very small wage differences; however, very few men and women work in the same job in the same firm. In addition, differentials build up over careers and these may not be reflected in cross-sectional differentials.

There is a great need for studies focusing on occupations, industries, and selected groups. Students could look for questions related to graduates in economics and business administration using data from NHH surveys.). Students could study questions on labour markets and policies fighting unfair differences at the national level for Norway or another country, or internationally (EIGE database).

International evidence on labour markets is very important to learn and valuable to your career if you work, for example, in a company that does trade with EU and the world. Labour is the main input factor to the firm. Germany is a country important to learn about, since it is one of the main trading partners of Norway, followed by the UK etc.

  • EIGE database, ILO
  • SIAB (German register data, employer-employee matched panel, 1975-2015
  • SOEP (Socio Economic Panel for Germany, 1984-2016)
  • NHH annual graduate survey

Macroeconomics

Assessing the norwegian macroeconomic policy framework.

The design of monetary and fiscal policy has moved towards a rule based framework, exemplified by the so-called Taylor rule or the “Handlingsreglene” governing the management of the oil fund in Norway. How does monetary and/or fiscal policy respond  to shocks affecting the Norwegian economy? Are the responses of macroeconomic policy stable over time. How did the economy and financial markets respond to the introduction of these rules?

Clarida, R., J. Gali and M. Gertler. (1999). The Science of Monetary Policy: A New Keynesian Perspective, Journal of Economic Literature 37(4): 1661-1707. J. Taylor (2000). Reassessing Discretionary Fiscal Policy. Journal of Economic Perspectives 14(3): 21-36.

Suitable for profiles:   ECN, ECO, FIE

Supervisor: Gernot Doppelhofer

Business Cycles and Gender

Men and women work in different sectors, which are differently susceptible to business cycle fluctuations. In the US, the stereotype is that men work in the construction sector, which is highly business cycle sensitive, while women work in the education sector, in which hours worked do not fluctuate much over the business cycle. There are also differences in the aggregate behavior of hours worked in the group of people living in one-person households and those living in couple households. Are the same patterns true in Norway as well? What could the reason be for why / why not?

Albanesi, S. and A. ƞahin (2018). The Gender Unemployment Gap. Review of Economic Dynamics 30, 47–67. Olsson, J. Singles, Couples, and Their Labor Supply: Long-run Trends and Short-run Fluctuations. Working paper.

Suitable for profiles:   ECN, ECO

Supervisor: Jonna Olsson

Economic growth and the input factor labor

How much does the input factor labor account for in the national product in Norway? A Norwegian minister once said in public: Women are more worth than oil in Norway. Is that true and how can we measure the contribution over time? In this thesis students can conceptionally think about a growth model and how to measure the contribution of labour to growth and the level of production in an economy. This could include a literature survey and an overview of estimates for different countries and time periods. Then they can take the model to Norwegian data or other data to estimate the contribution. For the empirical estimations the students could explore Norwegian register data accessible on microdata at NHH. This is a sketch of the idea and the students can develop their own ideas.

Fields: macro-economics, labour economics, empirical, econometrics

Profiles: ECON

Supervisors: Astrid Kunze

How Prevalent is Downward Rigidity in Nominal Wages in Norway?

Since Keynes, macroeconomists typically assume that wages are rigid, i.e., cannot be adjusted downward. However, the empirical evidence is still scant. In Norway, we now have good data to test this assumption empirically. The master thesis would aim to assess the degree of wage rigidity using rich Norwegian administrative datasets (on firms and their employees). 

Elsby, Michael W. L, Solon, Gary (2019) How Prevalent is Downward Rigidity in Nominal Wages? International Evidence from Payroll Records and Pay Slips, Journal of Economic Perspectives, 185-201.

Suitable for profiles: ECN

Is there a Beveridge curve in the Norwegian housing market?

Originally, the Beveridge curve measures the relationship between the number of vacant positions and the number of unemployed people in the labour market. It gives expression to the existence of search frictions in this market. But the housing market is also characterised by such frictions: it takes time for a buyer to find a suitable house and for a seller to get in touch with a buyer. 

This project would consist in (i) collecting monthly data about the number of buyers searching for a house, e.g., based on data about visits during house showings, (ii) collecting data about the number of houses for sale, and (iii) estimating the relationship between both variables during the business cycle. Focus can be on the housing market for one of the larger cities in Norway.

Genvose and Han (2012) Search and matching in the housing market. Journal of Urban Economics.

Gabrovski and Ortego-Marti (2019) The cyclical behavior of the Beveridge curve in the housing market.

Gabrovski and Ortego-Marti (2022) On the slope of the Beveridge curve in the housing market.

Data: Data from eiendomnorge.no, real estate agencies

Suitable for profiles: ECN, ECO, FIN, BAN

Supervisor: Fred Schroyen

NOWCASTING AND PREDICTING THE NORWEGIAN ECONOMY

A large number of indicators have been proposed to predict the current and future state of the economy. Many macroeconomic or financial data are being reported at different points in time and some are subject to revisions. The measurement of current and future economic conditions is essential for the conduct  of macroeconomic policy, dating of business cycles and household or financial decision making . What are important factors predicting current and future economic activity and financial variables, such as exchange rates, stock prices, …?

Stock, J. and M. Watson. (1999). Forecasting Inflation. Journal of Monetary Economics v44(2): 293-335

Price changes among manufacturing firms

To understand how prices are adjusted, and why, is very important, for both consumers, firm-owners and -managers, regulators and macro economists. The typical IO question; How does a firm set the price or quantity in relation to other market participants? Macro economists: Monetary policy has only a real effect if prices (and wages) are sticky (think of the IS-LM or AD-AS models). Price adjustment costs and their nature are central for industrial organization and the macro economy. What do we know empirically about the micro behaviour of firms? Do we see some patterns in firms’ price setting? Do we observe immediate responses to demand-, technology-, and cost-shocks?

Based on survey information from Statistics Norway about product prices in the manufacturing industry, merged with register data on firms’ revenues, costs, investments, and labour demand there are several topics for empirical master theses on pricing behaviour, either seen through the lenses of an IO scholar, or a macro economist.

Data: 

As the data include highly sensitive information, it is necessary to apply for access to the data.

Suitable for profiles:  ECN

Supervisor:  Prof. Øivind A. Nilsen

The price development on the real estate market in a non-Scandinavian country

In many European countries, the housing market is characterized by soaring prices.  Is this price evolution reflecting a development in the underlying fundamentals for this market, or are actual prices and fundamentals little connected, thereby possibly indicating a price bubble?  Using quarterly data on real estate prices, this project would estimate a model for the housing market allowing for both fundamentals and error-corrections mechanisms.

Bergman and Sørensen (2021) The interaction of actual and fundamental house prices: a general model with an application to Sweden, Journal of Housing Economics 54 .

Data:  Real estate price statistics, housing stock statistics, national account data

Suitable for profiles:  ECN, ECO,FIN.

Supervisor:  Fred Schroyen

Corporate sustainability, firm performance and economic growth

Firms, consumers, investors and stakeholders more generally are increasingly informing their decisions based on  environmental, social and governance (ESG) credentials. 

Policies are put in place fostering ESG reporting. Governments are implementing regulations requiring organisations to increase transparency in areas such as diversity, equal pay, carbon emissions and complying with responsible working conditions. On the 21st of April 2021, the EU commission announced the adoption of the Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive (CSRD) in line with the commitment made under the European Green Deal. The proposed directive will also entail a dramatic increase in the number of companies subject to the EU sustainability reporting requirements across the EU countries.

The hypothesis or claim is that sustainable growth is the only way to build a successful business and have a lasting impact on our environment and society. More empirical research is needed in this area and this topic area offers opportunities for mastertheses in, for example,  macroeconomics, public economics, management, finance, and resource economics.

Examples of research questions for masterthesis:

Collect data on how many firms report on ESG and make reports publicly available in Norway or the EU. Here students can focus on one aspect or a subset.

What is the quality of ESG reporting and are firms pursuing the attempted goals? E.g. what is the quality of firms’ reports on gender equality and gender diversity consistent with national statistics? Students can collect their own data for a subset of Norwegian firms and compare these to Norwegian micro-statistics or indicators based on firm-level data.

Consultancies are providing guidance and software to help firms report on ESG. An interesting thesis could contain collecting data on these and organise an overview of the work of consultancies in this area, e.g. on equality and gender diversity or environment. This material could then be critically assessed comparing it to main indicators and challenges in terms of equality and D&I.

Students interested in macroeconomics could quantify the contribution of human capital to growth and discuss the expected chances coming from ESG reporting and the transition of the economy.

Data sources and methods:

  • Firm level data collected by the students (could use hand collection, text analysis, scaping, or other methods)
  • Firm level data: SNF database, BoardEx Data
  • Regression analysis (programs STATA or R)
  • OECD data, EIGE data (on equality, wages, education, job titles)

Gillan, S. L., Koch, A., & Starks, L. T. (2021). Firms and social responsibility: A review of ESG and CSR research in corporate finance.  Journal of Corporate Finance ,  66 , 101889.

Post, C., & Byron, K. (2015). Women on boards and firm financial performance: A meta-analysis.  Academy of management Journal ,  58 (5), 1546-1571.

Miller, A. R. (2018). Women and leadership in Averett, S., & Hoffman, S. D. (Eds.). (2018).  The Oxford handbook of women and the economy . Oxford University Press.

Kunze, A. (2020): Kjønnsmessig mangfold i ledelsen" (Gender diversity in top management), Magma, No. 320, Årgang 23, 3/2020.

Fields: macroeconomics, public economics, management, finance, and resource economics

If you are interested please get in touch with Prof. Astrid Kunze, Assoc. Prof. Krisztina Molnar, or Antoine Bertheau

Microeconomics & Industrial Organization

Competition and pricing in the european airline industry.

The airline industry is comprised of large, capital-intensive firms competing on prices, availability and prices, making decisions over prices, routes to operate and fleet. Important features of competition is price discrimination, use of loyalty programs and entry in or exit from specific routes, in the face of potentially tough competition and volatile demand over the business cycle. The European and Norwegian airline industry has changed dramatically over the years, with changing technologies, travel habits, regulations, taxation and industry structure. The rise of low-cost carriers from the late 90s and early 2000s and the strategic responses of flag carriers, for instance by reducing prices in response to even merely the threat of entry has been important for the development of the industry we see today, in addition to the growing domestic, regional and international policy debates on how to handle the carbon footprint of the sector in later years.

There are many possible directions for a thesis on this topic, for instance:

  • What factors determine how an incumbent airline responds to increased threat of entry on a route?
  • How would carbon taxation influence fleet choices and competition in the industry?
  • What is the effect of loyalty programs on demand and competition?
  • Differences in price discrimination across routes and carriers: What are the main drivers?
  • Aircraft investment and the business cycle: A recipe for hysteresis?

Key literature:

Goolsbee, A. and Syverson, C. (2008) "How Do Incumbents Respond to the Threat of Entry? Evidence from the Major Airlines", Quarterly Journal of Economics, 123, pp. 1611–1633

Borenstein, S. and Rose, N. L. (1994) "Competition and Price Dispersion in the U.S. Airline Industry", Journal of Political Economy, 102, pp. 653–683

"Aviation Industry Leaders Report 2022: Recovery through Resilience", KPMG, edited by Victoria Tozer-Pennington 

Data: Data on number of passengers and prices for separate routes, airlines and ticket classes can be made available by supervisors.

Suitable for profiles: BAN, BUS, ECN, ECO, ENE, FIN

Possible supervisors: Lars Sørgard , Mateusz Mysliwski , Morten Sæthre

DO ECONOMIC BOOMS AND BUSTS AFFECT SLEEPING PATTERNS AND THE NUMBER OF HOURS OF LEISURE ACTIVITIES?

Although health is usually thought to worsen when the economy weakens, substantial recent research suggests that mortality actually declines during such periods. Could this decline in mortality be explained by people enjoying more free time and more sleep during recession?

Christopher J. Ruhm (2000): “Are Recessions Good for Your Health?” The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 115 (2): 617-650.

Data: Norwegian time use survey 1971-2010

DO SMOKING POLICIES AFFECT SMOKING BEHAVIOR AND DO BETTER-EDUCATED INDIVIDUALS REACT FASTER TO POLICY CHANGES?

The strong correlation between education and health, even after controlling for income, has been recognized as a robust empirical observation in the social sciences and economic literature (Deaton and Paxson 2003; Lleras-Muney 2004). The decision to smoke or not to smoke is a conscious choice that directly affects the health status and ultimately the mortality of individuals. It therefore provides an interesting opportunity to investigate how education, by influencing behaviors, affects health outcomes.

Damien de Walque (2010): “Education, Information, and Smoking Decisions: Evidence from Smoking Histories in the United States, 1940–2000” Journal of Human Resources, 45:682-717.

Data: Norwegian smoking habit survey from 1973-2011

Suitable for profiles:   ECO, ECN, (STR, INB, BUS)

(Note: Theses under this topic can be eligible for an Equinor scholarship for master theses .)

Suitable for profiles: BUS, ECN, ECO, ENE, FIN

(Tentative) supervisor:  Samuel D. Hirshman , Harim Kim, Eirik G. Kristiansen , Mateusz Mysliwski and/or Morten Sæthre

HOW CAN WE EXPLAIN CEO PAY?

There is a widespread suspicion that top managers and other key person are overpaid. They are frequently lavishly rewarded when the firm is lucky and not penalized when the firm is unlucky. Some receive discretionary severance pay that the firms are not committed to pay. Pay structure and level seem to depend on the owner structure. There are a large set of observations that are puzzling if you believe that owners should provide cost efficient incentives to managers. The project might examine pay structure in a particular industry or across countries and compare observations with empirical predictions from analytical models.

Bebchuk, L. A. and J. M. Fried (2004) Pay without performance: The unfulfilled promise of executive compensation, Harvard University Press

Suitable for profiles: ECO, ECN, FIN

Supervisor: Eirik Gaard Kristiansen

How should we pay for drugs? Is Netflix a model?

Health plans negotiate rebates on list prices with drug companies. If the net price is sufficiently low, the health plan may decide to include the drug in their plan so that the drug is reimbursed and available for patients. The current model is that health plans pay a uniform net price per unit purchased from the drug company. Recently, there has been proposed a different payment regime – called the Netflix model. Instead of paying a uniform price, proponents of the Netflix model argue that health plans should instead pay a fixed (subscription) fee to the drug company for getting access to the drug at marginal costs (or zero costs). The argument is that two-part tariffs is more efficient given the high innovation costs and low production costs. Opponents argue that the Netflix model will extract more consumer surplus and lead to higher costs for health plans. Some countries and health plans are now testing the Netflix model, which also seems to be relevant for the new covid-19 vaccine.

Barros, P. and X. Martinez-Giralt (2012) Health economics: an industrial organization perspective. Routledge. Chapter 17

The Economist (2019): The antibiotic industry is broken. Take inspiration from the entertainment industry. Leader.

Suitable for profiles: ECN, ECO, BUS, STR

Supervisor: Kurt R. Brekke

Data:  Data from eiendomnorge.no, real estate agencies

Suitable for profiles:  ECN, ECO, FIN, BAN

MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND FIRMS

We know very little about the management practices in Norway. International data have shown that great differences exist between family businesses, multinationals and that the public sector has relatively worse management practices. Questions related to measurement and comparison of management practices invite to a great number of research ideas for a master thesis. You can explore  existing data sets, and create extended data by merging additional firm level information.

Corecon. Empirical Project 6: Measuring Management Practices

Data:  World Management Survey

Suitable for profiles:  ECN, FIN, STR.

Maximum likelihood estimation of a demand system

The almost ideal demand (AID) system was developed by Deaton and Muellbauer (1980).  It specifies a household’s set of demand functions for different goods and services.  The AID system combines flexibility and consistency with theoretical properties with a specification for the demand equations that allows for tractable estimation.

However, one of the weaknesses of the AID system is that the crucial property of negativity (that compensated demand functions should always slope downwards—the “law of demand”) cannot be imposed under estimation without giving up the flexibility of the system.

To remedy this weakness, Moschini (1998) suggested incorporating the negativity property “at the mean data point”, i.e., to make sure that if the household has the average income level and faces the average prices in the dataset, then its behavior respects the “law of demand”.  While not solving the problem completely, this is a big step forward.

The purpose of the thesis would be to write a maximum likelihood estimation programme in Stata that incorporates Moschini’s restriction, and use it on household budget survey data for Norway to obtain estimates for income and price elasticities.  

Deaton A and J Muellbauer (1980) An almost ideal demand system, American Economic Review 70 , 312-336.

Moschini (1998) The semi-flexible almost ideal demand system, European Economic Review 42 , 349-364.

Data: Household budget survey data collected by Statistics Norway (SSBs Forbruksundersøkelsen 1999-2012 )

Suitable for profiles : ECO, ECN

Merger remedies: Is the cure effective in restoring competition?

Mergers that restrict competition should be stopped by competition authorities. However companies may propose remedies that reduce or eliminate the competitive harm to get the merger cleared. Such remedies can be structural or behavioral. Structural remedies imply usually that competing activity are divested to a new or existing company in the market. Behavioral remedies are usually commitments to abstain from various forms of anti-competitive behavior for a given period after the merger. Merger remedies can be a win-win in the sense that the harm to competition can be solved and otherwise profitable mergers can be carried out. However recent studies show that this instrument in merger control is inefficient in restoring competition and that mergers that are cleared with remedies tend to result in price increases after the merger. Why is that? Is the problem mainly related to behavioral remedies? Are there inherent incentive or information problems? How can merger control be improved? This project should combine theory and data. Data can be made available upon request.

Kwoka, J. (2015): Mergers, merger control and remedies: a retrospective analysis of US policy. The MIT Press.

Supervisor: Lars Sørgard

The market for gift cards

In Norway, and in many other countries, gift cards have become popular. Both firms, organisations, and private persons buy gift cards as presents during the Christmas season or on occasions like birthdays. Like money, gift cards give the recipient a wider variety of things to choose from.  At the same time, gift cards are more memorable than an envelope with cash. But gift cards come with restrictions. They can only be used in certain stores/chains of stores, and they expire after a well-defined period. For these reasons, a second-hand market for gift cards has developed. You can buy gift cards on finn.no or Ebay at a discount of their nominal value.

Offenberg, Jennifer Pate (2007) "Markets: Gift Cards", Journal of Economic Perspectives, 21, pp. 227-238. 

Data:  Data from Finn.no, "Bygavekort" Bergen

Suitable for profiles: ECN, ECO

Possible supervisors: Fred Schroyen

THE PEAK-END-RULE AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

The peak-end-rule says that the most memorable parts of an experience is the peak (i.e the most enjoyable period) and the end. Daniel Kahneman and co-authors have for example shown that you can make patients better off by simply extending a painful medical treatment with a more joyful period at the end. The idea of this thesis proposal is to test the peak-end theory in a relevant, high-stake, real-world environment. In particular, the aim is to combine data from e.g. the Premier League in England  with regional data on domestic violence and other offensive behavior, and test whether football fans are more upset, and therefore make more criminal acts, when their team lost because of a goal occurring in the final minutes of the game as opposed to the same nominal loss, but were the score was determined earlier in the game. The thesis will also include a replication of the paper by Card and Dahl (2011) on prospect theory and violence

Key reference: 

Card and Dahl (2011), Family Violence and Football: The Effect of Unexpected Emotional Cues on Violent Behavior, Quarterly Journal of Economics

The use of budget survey data to estimate demand functions

In many countries, the statistical office regularly carries out a household budget survey.  Such a survey documents how households allocate their budget over different commodity and service groups.  The same statistical office also constructs price indices for different consumption categories.  Using these two data sources, the project would consist in estimating a system of demand functions that describes the price and income sensitivity of the different consumption categories, and in testing the microeconomic properties of such functions.  Estimation can be carried out with existing user friendly Stata programmes.

Banks J, R Blundell and A Lewbell (1997) Quadratic Engel Curves and Consumer Demand, Review of Economics and Statistics 79 , 527-539

Data:  Household budget survey data and price indices for your country

Suitable for profiles:  ECN, ECO.

Public Economics

Four topics on challenges in the electricity markets.

There is a dramatic transition taking place in energy markets, where renewable energy is about to replace energy based on fossil fuels. In Europe coal, gas and oil is about to be replaced by renewable energy such as solar power and wind power. One challenge, though, is that the renewable energy is intermittent. For example, wind power produces for full capacity in some time periods, and have zero production in other time periods. This irregularity may lead to increased volatility in electricity prices, with very low prices when the wind is blowing and very high prices else.

In the Norwegian electricity market more than 90 % of its production of electricity comes from hydro power. In contrast to renewable energy such a wind power, hydro power is flexible since water can be stored in reservoirs. Such a flexibility is valuable, since one can reallocate production such that it produces when it is most needed. On the other hand, the total supply of energy in a hydro power system during a year is dependent on the weather. In a wet year with a lot of rain, the total production in Norway is approximately 30 % higher than the domestic consumption. However, in a dry year the domestic supply is lower than the domestic demand.

Due to a move from fossil fuels to electricity, the domestic demand is expected to increase the next years in Norway (and other countries). Unless Norway expands production substantially in the coming years, which is unlikely given the (lack of) decisions that have been made concerning new power plants, the next ten years the periods with excess supply in the Norwegian electricity market will be fewer than before.

The present crisis, with gas being decisive for the prices in the electricity market for the whole of Europe, adds to the challenges Europe is facing with the transition to renewable energy. There is at present an ongoing debate in Europe whether there is a need for a structural reform of the market design of the electricity market. Some question the coordinated system of export or imports of electricity, while others question the model where the producer with the highest costs sets the price (the so called merit order system).

  • Describe the present market design for electricity, and discuss pros and cons of the system that is used today. In particular, discuss how suitable such a system is for a future situation with much more intermittent electricity production (especially wind and solar power).
  • Consider the situation for Norway, with mostly hydro power. Discuss how Norway can gain from trade with the rest of Europe. In particular, what are the pros and cons of building more transmission lines (or scrapping some existing ones) between Norway and surrounding countries.
  • In Norway there is a rather high seller concentration in situations with bottlenecks on the transmission lines, and then markets becoming national or even smaller than that. Discuss how a producer with market power can behave in such a system, and whether there are any structural reforms that can curb any potential harmful exploitation of market power.
  • There are some large producers in the Norwegian electricity market, with water reservoirs that makes it possible to store water even from one year to another. Discuss how such a player should allocate its sales of water in order to maximize profits, and relate your predictions from theory to what you observe in this market.

Possible majors: ECN, ECO, BUS, STR (depending on the focus of the thesis)

Possible supervisors: Depending on the approach you choose, but Lars Sørgard or other faculty members from the Department of Economics

HOW EFFECTIVE ARE THE NORWEGIAN INCENTIVE SCHEMES FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES?

Several countries, including U.S.A., Canada and Norway, have introduced incentives to encourage the sale of electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles. There is a debate over the effectiveness of these policies in achieving the desired policy goals, such as reductions in CO2 emissions. The Norwegian incentive scheme is notable for high subsidies as well as other extensive benefits, including exemption from the registration tax, free toll roads, free parking, and programs for building charging stations. More detailed knowledge about the effects of specific parts of the incentive scheme would be helpful, both to inform possible improvements of the incentive schemes, but also for planning purposes in businesses and local governments. There are several open questions regarding the effect of the rich incentive scheme. One question regards how much the different policies contribute to increasing electric vehicle sales. A related question is whether they have differential impact on which modes of transportation consumers substitute away from, e.g., whether consumers substitute away from regular cars, public transport and biking, both at the intensive and the extensive margin. A master thesis on this topic could focus on one or several specific policies and subquestions.

Fearnley et al (2015): "E-vehicle policies and incentives - assessment and recommendations", TØI report 1421/2015; Chandra et al (2010): "Green drivers or free riders? An analysis of tax rebates for hybrids vehicles", Journal of Environmental Economics and Management 60: 78-93; Holtsmark (2012): "Elbilpolitikken - virker den etter hensikten?", Samfunnsøkonomen 5: 4-11

Data: Detailed data about car ownership including some usage measures per vehicle can be provided by the supervisor, in addition to data on tollroads and charging stations.

Suitable for profiles: ECO, ECN, ENE, BUS, FIE, INB

Supervisor: Morten Sæthre

REGULATION OF FINANCIAL MARKETS: HOW CAN THE POLITICAL PROCESS PRODUCE VERY DIFFERENT REGULATIONS ACROSS COUNTRIES?

Improved financial market regulation ensure that information is widely spread and investors can trust information and contracts. However, not all parties benefit from better regulation. For example, some established firms dislike that new entrants obtain financing, demand for labour may increase which again will increase wages.  In an influential book, Rajan and Zingales describe how financial regulation across countries can be explained by political forces in favour and against better regulation. A possible project would be to discuss how strong labour unions, industry structure, openness to trade and other institutional characteristics can explain the current regulation in Norway. The project might combine insights from analytical approaches discussed in Tirole with the empirical literature discussed in the book by Rajan and Zingales.

Rajan R. G. and L. Zingales (2003), Saving capitalism from the capitalists Princeton University Press.

Tirole, J (2006) The theory of Corporate Finance, see chapter 16 on Institutions, Public Policy and the Political Economy of Finance, Princeton University Press.

TECHNOLOGY MARKETS: HOW TO (NOT) SELL TECHNOLOGIES?

The best innovators are often not the best producers. Many patented technologies with different owners need to be used together in order to produce a valuable product. Consequently, there should be a vivid market for technology transactions. However, many claim that the market is smaller than expected and not working very well. Knowhow is not easy to sell: None are willing to buy something before they have seen it, and when they have seen it (and can use it) why should they pay for it? Will the patent system solve the problem or can patenting prevent investments in new technologies. You might use Apple (or another firm) as a motivating example for a study of how firms might organize sales and purchases of technologies?

Bessen, J. and M.J. Meurer, (2008) Patent failure: How judges, bureaucrats, and lawyers put innovation at risk, Princeton University Press.

Jaffe, A. B. and J. Lerner (2004): Innovation and its Discontents: How our broken patent system is endangering innovation and progress, and what to do about it, Princeton University Press

Suitable for profiles: ECO, ECN, FIN, STR

The death of Queen Elizabeth II.-a Monetary policy shock

Queen Elizabeth II. died on 8 September 2022. The queen liked to "keep calm, and carry on" whatever happened. In contrast to this spirit, the next day Bank of England announced delaying their upcoming pre-scheduled monetary policy meeting from 15 to 22 September. The rescheduling was unexpected, i.e., an exogenous monetary policy shock. This time it was not an unexpected decision but an unexpected `lack of.` Financial markets expected a new interest rate hike. However, for a further week, interest rates stayed the same.

The thesis investigates the effect of this unexpected delay of MPC decisions on financial markets. Our method to isolate this story from other news events is to use high-frequency data in a narrow window around the announcement.

Nakamura, Emi, and Jón Steinsson. Forth- coming. “High Frequency Identification of Monetary Non-Neutrality: The Information Effect.” Quarterly Journal of Economics

Supervisors:   Markus Karlman and Krisztina Molnar  

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Development Economics (MSc)

  • Application

Impressions

Our master’s programme is a comprehensive course dedicated exclusively to the study of development issues. Throughout the programme, you will acquire a broad understanding of the economic, political, and social facets of development. Additionally, you will learn to approach complex problems from various perspectives and analyse them critically. The programme brings together individuals from diverse backgrounds and regions, offering a wide range of courses and opportunities for an exchange semester or fieldwork abroad - all experiences that can significantly broaden your horizons. Our students can choose to specialise in either quantitative economics or agricultural economics. This programme prepares you for your own field research and for roles in government agencies, development organisations, and the private sector.

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Study and internships abroad

Expand your horizons

General information: What is it all about?

The Master's programme in Development Economics offers research-oriented teaching that covers theoretical as well as empirical issues in economic development. It provides a wide range of courses in topics related to economic and agroeconomic issues in developing countries. The programme is very internationally oriented with a diverse student body and lecturers that specialise in different regions across the world. This will prepare you for an international working environment in the field of development cooperation or in international organisations, associations, NGOs as well as internationally oriented companies and research institutions.

Part of the programme is the possibility of a semester abroad, which provides you with global contacts and broadens your horizons. It enhances your language skills and offers experiences that will benefit you throughout your life. The stays abroad are made possible for you by the European exchange programme Erasmus+ or worldwide faculty or university programmes. If you participate in one of the mentioned programmes to study abroad, you typically won't be required to pay tuition fees at the foreign partner university.

You must be able to apply your knowledge not only in theory but also in the reality of your everyday working life. Therefore, when creating the curricula, we always make sure to establish a reference to the practical world in order to smooth your transition into professional life - for example, through lectures by practitioners. In addition, you will work on current, practice-relevant issues in your final thesis and use real data for this. In order to apply your acquired knowledge on the job, you can have a voluntary internship in the elective area credited to you under certain conditions.

Double Degree Programmes

Our double degree programmes offer you two Master’s degrees from renowned universities and an international study environment. In four semesters, you have the opportunity to complete the degree "Master of Science in Development Economics" at the University of Göttingen and, simultaneously, another Master's degree either at Stellenbosch University in South Africa, at the University of Florence School of Economics and Management in Italy or at the Ecole d'Economie der UniversitĂ€t Clermont Auvergne in France.

Career perspectives

The degree in development economics will offer excellent career perspectives in a wide range of fields:

  • Governments and aid agencies working on development issues
  • International organisations such as the World Bank, organisations of the UN system (e.g. ILO, FAO, UNIDO, UNDP, UNICEF, UNESCO, etc.), the OECD, EU, or regional development banks
  • Policy research institutions such as those of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research as well as national and international development policy think tanks
  • International business in multinational companies
  • Further education at the Ph.D. level in Göttingen or abroad

Related and consecutive/graduate programmes

Related programmes.

  • International Economics (MSc) (Double Degree)
  • Finance, Accounting and Taxes (MSc) (Double Degree)
  • Management (MSc) (Double Degree)
  • Business Information Systems (MSc)
  • Applied Statistics (MSc)
  • Business and Human Resource Education (MEd)
  • History of Global Markets (MA) (Multiple Degree)

Related programmes (cont.)

Consecutive/graduate programmes.

  • Structured PhD Programme of the Faculty of Business and Economics

Programme Structure

The Master's programme in Development Economics is four semesters in length during which 120 ECTS are required. It is divided into the course phase and the Master's thesis. There are three compulsory modules (i.e. courses) (18 credits) plus one further obligatory module which has to be either Econometrics I or Econometrics II (6 credits). Students can then specialise in agricultural economics or economics, each requiring a further 12 credits (two modules) of compulsory courses in the field of specialisation.

Then students can choose another 36 credits (six moduls) in development or agricultural economics from a wide variety of course offerings, of which one course (6 credits) has to be a seminar. Three modules (18 credits) can be chosen freely also among other subjects. The master's thesis (30 credits) completes the programme.

Students have to study abroad for one semester. This semester can be spent at a partner university of the Faculty of Business and Economics of Göttingen University. International students are exempt from this requirement.

Students may for example apply for the following partner university programmes:

  • Exchange programmes with universities in South Africa (Pretoria, Stellenbosch)
  • Exchange programmes with universities in Latin and South America (Colombia, Chile, Brazil, Mexico, Paraguay, El Salvador)
  • Exchange programme with the Sir Arthur Lewis Institute of Social and Economic Studies (SALISES) University of the West Indies
  • Exchange programmes with universities in Asia (for example China - funded by the DAAD, India, Indonesia, and South Korea)
  • European exchange programme ERASMUS

Detailed information about the study programme as well as a detailed listing of the modules/courses offered can be found on the programme website of the Faculty of Business and Economics .

Start of studies

  • winter semester
  • summer semester

Regulations and module directory

  • Current und older versions

Application deadlines

  • Application period for citizens from the EU/EEA ( European Economic Area ) OR applicants with a Bachelor’s degree from an EU/EEA country beginning in the winter semester: 1 April to 15 May of the same calendar year
  • Application period for citizens from non-EU/non-EEA (European Economic Area) countries AND a Bachelor’s degree from outside an EU/EEA country beginning in the winter semester: 1 October to 15 November of the previous calendar year

You can start this degree programme only in the winter semester.

Previous Education

  • A course of study of at least 6 semesters in length with a Bachelor's degree comprising at least 180 ECTS credits in the subject of Economics or a closely related subject.
  • Verification of at least 150 of the 180 ECTS credits is required at the time of application (83% of your overall credits for programmes with any other structure)

Language Requirements

  • English language skills are required.

Specialization in 8 master's programmes

After the Bachelor's degree you can deepen and expand your knowledge in eight consecutive master's programmes at the faculty. We offer Master's programmes in Business Administration, Economics, Business Information Systems, Business and Human Resource Education, Applied Statistics and History of Global Markets. Some Master programmes even include a double degree programme with renowned universities in Europe, South Africa and China. See in the video (in German) why it is worthwhile to study in Göttingen.

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Master of Arts, Economics, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University Bachelor of Arts, English Literature and Political Science, Laurentian University

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  5. Master in Development Economics

    Our master's programme is a comprehensive course dedicated exclusively to the study of development issues. Throughout the programme, you will acquire a broad understanding of the economic, political, and social facets of development. Additionally, you will learn to approach complex problems from various perspectives and analyse them critically.

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  24. Paul Halucha

    Education Master of Arts, Economics, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University Bachelor of Arts, English Literature and Political Science, Laurentian University Professional Experience Since August 2023 Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet (Clean Growth), Privy Council Office 2021 - 2023 Associate Deputy Minister of Environment and Climate Change 2018 - 2021 Assistant ...