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How to compare texts – WJEC How to structure a comparison response

Comparing texts can focus on any aspect of the writing. When writing a comparison, it is important to move equally between the two texts, and write about them together, not separately.

How to structure a comparison response

Two women playing a skipping rope game with the ropes representing a comparison response when structuring an essay.

A comparison response still follows the basic essay structure:

  • an introduction
  • four or five main points supported by details
  • a conclusion - this must link back to the question, and mention both texts

When you compare texts, it’s important to talk about both texts all the way through. Don’t write all about one text, then all about the other.

In each paragraph, make sure you mention both, even if a point is mostly about one of them.

Sentence starters

Some key phrases can help you to compare texts.

When comparing texts, you are making a point about two different texts, backing up ideas with evidence and explaining the idea. Then using a linking statement, you can connect the two ideas together.

Take a look at the structure of the following example, where the writer compares how their mother and father react to poor behaviour:

Both my Mum and Dad lose their temper sometimes when we misbehave, but in completely different ways.

My Mum usually reacts to everything by losing her temper really quickly and screaming in response to make sure everyone knows just how furious she is. The thing that causes her to react strictly is usually leaving lights on. The quotation, ‘If I have to tell you again to turn those lights off, I will take the bulb out of your bedroom!’ This shows that sometimes she can exaggerate in her reactions.

On the other hand, Dad will hardly ever lose his temper, or raise his voice. Instead, he will just stare at you silently, so you know instantly that you are in trouble. The quotation, ‘Well’ is the single word that he says once he has stared at you for a minute, and this shows that whilst he doesn’t scream and shout like Mum, he gives you a warning of the lecture that he is about to give you.

Notice how the writer makes a point about how each parent loses their temper, backs it up with evidence and then explains their idea. The linking sentence starting with ‘on the other hand’ shows how the two ideas are similar or different.

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  • Comparing and contrasting in an essay | Tips & examples

Comparing and Contrasting in an Essay | Tips & Examples

Published on August 6, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

Comparing and contrasting is an important skill in academic writing . It involves taking two or more subjects and analyzing the differences and similarities between them.

Table of contents

When should i compare and contrast, making effective comparisons, comparing and contrasting as a brainstorming tool, structuring your comparisons, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about comparing and contrasting.

Many assignments will invite you to make comparisons quite explicitly, as in these prompts.

  • Compare the treatment of the theme of beauty in the poetry of William Wordsworth and John Keats.
  • Compare and contrast in-class and distance learning. What are the advantages and disadvantages of each approach?

Some other prompts may not directly ask you to compare and contrast, but present you with a topic where comparing and contrasting could be a good approach.

One way to approach this essay might be to contrast the situation before the Great Depression with the situation during it, to highlight how large a difference it made.

Comparing and contrasting is also used in all kinds of academic contexts where it’s not explicitly prompted. For example, a literature review involves comparing and contrasting different studies on your topic, and an argumentative essay may involve weighing up the pros and cons of different arguments.

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sentence starters for comparison essay

As the name suggests, comparing and contrasting is about identifying both similarities and differences. You might focus on contrasting quite different subjects or comparing subjects with a lot in common—but there must be some grounds for comparison in the first place.

For example, you might contrast French society before and after the French Revolution; you’d likely find many differences, but there would be a valid basis for comparison. However, if you contrasted pre-revolutionary France with Han-dynasty China, your reader might wonder why you chose to compare these two societies.

This is why it’s important to clarify the point of your comparisons by writing a focused thesis statement . Every element of an essay should serve your central argument in some way. Consider what you’re trying to accomplish with any comparisons you make, and be sure to make this clear to the reader.

Comparing and contrasting can be a useful tool to help organize your thoughts before you begin writing any type of academic text. You might use it to compare different theories and approaches you’ve encountered in your preliminary research, for example.

Let’s say your research involves the competing psychological approaches of behaviorism and cognitive psychology. You might make a table to summarize the key differences between them.

Or say you’re writing about the major global conflicts of the twentieth century. You might visualize the key similarities and differences in a Venn diagram.

A Venn diagram showing the similarities and differences between World War I, World War II, and the Cold War.

These visualizations wouldn’t make it into your actual writing, so they don’t have to be very formal in terms of phrasing or presentation. The point of comparing and contrasting at this stage is to help you organize and shape your ideas to aid you in structuring your arguments.

When comparing and contrasting in an essay, there are two main ways to structure your comparisons: the alternating method and the block method.

The alternating method

In the alternating method, you structure your text according to what aspect you’re comparing. You cover both your subjects side by side in terms of a specific point of comparison. Your text is structured like this:

Mouse over the example paragraph below to see how this approach works.

One challenge teachers face is identifying and assisting students who are struggling without disrupting the rest of the class. In a traditional classroom environment, the teacher can easily identify when a student is struggling based on their demeanor in class or simply by regularly checking on students during exercises. They can then offer assistance quietly during the exercise or discuss it further after class. Meanwhile, in a Zoom-based class, the lack of physical presence makes it more difficult to pay attention to individual students’ responses and notice frustrations, and there is less flexibility to speak with students privately to offer assistance. In this case, therefore, the traditional classroom environment holds the advantage, although it appears likely that aiding students in a virtual classroom environment will become easier as the technology, and teachers’ familiarity with it, improves.

The block method

In the block method, you cover each of the overall subjects you’re comparing in a block. You say everything you have to say about your first subject, then discuss your second subject, making comparisons and contrasts back to the things you’ve already said about the first. Your text is structured like this:

  • Point of comparison A
  • Point of comparison B

The most commonly cited advantage of distance learning is the flexibility and accessibility it offers. Rather than being required to travel to a specific location every week (and to live near enough to feasibly do so), students can participate from anywhere with an internet connection. This allows not only for a wider geographical spread of students but for the possibility of studying while travelling. However, distance learning presents its own accessibility challenges; not all students have a stable internet connection and a computer or other device with which to participate in online classes, and less technologically literate students and teachers may struggle with the technical aspects of class participation. Furthermore, discomfort and distractions can hinder an individual student’s ability to engage with the class from home, creating divergent learning experiences for different students. Distance learning, then, seems to improve accessibility in some ways while representing a step backwards in others.

Note that these two methods can be combined; these two example paragraphs could both be part of the same essay, but it’s wise to use an essay outline to plan out which approach you’re taking in each paragraph.

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If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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Some essay prompts include the keywords “compare” and/or “contrast.” In these cases, an essay structured around comparing and contrasting is the appropriate response.

Comparing and contrasting is also a useful approach in all kinds of academic writing : You might compare different studies in a literature review , weigh up different arguments in an argumentative essay , or consider different theoretical approaches in a theoretical framework .

Your subjects might be very different or quite similar, but it’s important that there be meaningful grounds for comparison . You can probably describe many differences between a cat and a bicycle, but there isn’t really any connection between them to justify the comparison.

You’ll have to write a thesis statement explaining the central point you want to make in your essay , so be sure to know in advance what connects your subjects and makes them worth comparing.

Comparisons in essays are generally structured in one of two ways:

  • The alternating method, where you compare your subjects side by side according to one specific aspect at a time.
  • The block method, where you cover each subject separately in its entirety.

It’s also possible to combine both methods, for example by writing a full paragraph on each of your topics and then a final paragraph contrasting the two according to a specific metric.

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Comparison and Contrast Guide

Comparison and Contrast Guide

About this Interactive

Related resources.

This interactive guide provides an introduction to the basic characteristics and resources that are typically used when students compose comparison and contrast essays. The Comparison and Contrast Guide includes an overview, definitions and examples. The Organizing a Paper section includes details on whole-to-whole (block), point-by-point, and similarities-to-differences structures. In addition, the Guide explains how graphic organizers are used for comparison and contrast, provides tips for using transitions between ideas in comparison and contrast essays, and includes a checklist, which matches an accompanying rubric .

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Sentence Starters: Ultimate List to Improve Your Essays and Writing

Ashley Shaw

Ashley Shaw

How to start a sentence

This blog post is going to be about … No. Too boring.

Today, I am going to talk to you about ... No. Too specific.

This is a blog post for all writers ... Nope. Too generic.

Has this ever been you while writing? I get it. Writing a good sentence can be hard, and when you have to string a whole lot of them together, the task can become daunting. So what do you do?

From the first sentence you write to the very last, you want each one to show your style and motivate your reader to keep reading. In this post, we are going to think about how you start your sentences.

sentence starter tip

What Is a Good Sentence Starter for an Essay Introduction?

What is a good sentence starter for a body paragraph, 25 useful transitions, can i repeat a sentence starter, how can i rephrase "in conclusion".

The first paragraph of a paper can make or break your grade. It is what gets your audience into the topic and sets the whole stage. Because of this, it is important to get your readers hooked early.

The first sentence of a paper is often called the hook. It shouldn’t be anything ordinary. It should have strong language and be a little surprising, with an interesting fact, story, statistic, or quote on the topic.

Because it is designed to pull the reader in and surprise them a little, it is often good to avoid pre-written sentence starter examples when writing your hook. Just get into it here, and worry about the flow later.

Here are some examples:

Spider webs were once used as bandages.

I taught myself to read when I was three. At least, that’s the story my parents tell.

Recent studies suggest that the average person lies at least once in every conversation.

“The world is bleeding and humans wield the knife,” or so says environmental scientist So Andso.

(P.S. Except for example 1, which is true, I just made all of these up to demonstrate my point. So, please don’t quote me on these!)

Once you jump right in with your hook, it is time to start working on ways to move sentences along. Here is where you may need some sentence starter examples.

In your first paragraph, you basically want to connect your hook to your thesis. You’ll do this with a few sentences setting up the stage for your topic and the claim you will make about it. To do that, follow the tips found in the next section on body paragraphs and general sentence starter tips.

Many of the tips I am about to discuss can be used anywhere in a paper, but they are especially helpful when writing body paragraphs.

Let’s start with one of the most important types of sentence starter in essay writing: transition words.

How Do I Use Transitions in an Essay?

Definition of Transitions

If you want to start writing terrific sentences (and improve your essay structure ), the first thing you should do is start using transition words.

Transition words are those words or phrases that help connect thoughts and ideas. They move one sentence or paragraph into another, and they make things feel less abrupt.

The good thing about transition words is that you probably know a lot of them already and currently use them in your speech. Now, you just need to transition them into your writing. (See what I did there?)

Before we get into examples of what a good transition word is, let’s look at a paragraph without any transitions:

I went to the store. I bought bacon and eggs. I saw someone I knew. I said hello. I went to the cashier. They checked me out. I paid. I got my groceries. I went to my car. I returned home.

Yikes! That is some boring writing. It was painful to write, and I am sure it is even worse to read. There are two reasons for this:

  • I start every sentence with the same word (more on this later)
  • There are no signposts showing me how the ideas in the paragraph connect.

In an essay, you need to show how each of your ideas relate to each other to build your argument. If you just make a series of statements one after the other, you’re not showing your instructor that you actually understand those statements, or your topic.

How do we fix this? Transition words. Roughly 25% of your sentences should start with a transition word. If you can hit that number in your essay, you’ll know that you’ve made meaningful steps towards demonstrating your understanding.

Of course, hitting that number isn’t enough—those transitions need to be meaningful. Let’s look at the different types of transitions and how you can use them.

What Are Words Like First , Next , and Last Called?

You probably already use some transitions in your essays. For example, if you start a paragraph with firstly , you’ve used a transition word. But transitions can do so much more!

Here are 25 common transitional words and phrases that you could use in your essay:

  • Additionally / In Addition
  • Alternatively / Conversely
  • As a result of
  • At this time
  • Consequently
  • Contrary to
  • First(ly), Second(ly), etc.
  • In contrast
  • Nonetheless
  • On the other hand
  • Particularly / In particular
  • In other words

Common Transitional Words

This list isn’t exhaustive, but it is a good start.

These words show different types of relationships between ideas. These relationships fall into four main categories: Emphasis , Contrast , Addition , and Order .

What Are Emphasis Transition Words?

These phrases are used when you want to highlight a point. Examples from my above list include clearly , particularly , and indeed . Want to see some more? Follow my bolded transitions: Undoubtedly , you understand now. It should be noted that you don’t need to worry.

How Do You Use Addition Transitions?

These words add on to what you just said. These are words like along with , moreover , and also . Here are some more: Not only are you going to be great at transitions after this, but you will also be good at writing sentences. Furthermore , everyone is excited to see what you have to say.

How Can I Use Transitions to Contrast Ideas?

This is the opposite of addition, and you use it when you want to show an alternative view or to compare things. Examples from my list include words like nonetheless , contrary to , and besides .

Here are some more: Unlike people who haven’t read this article, you are going to be really prepared to write great sentences. Even so , there is still a lot more about writing to learn.

How Do I Order Ideas in My Essay?

A good first step is using order transition words.

This set of transitions helps mark the passage of time or gives an order to events. From the list, think of things like first and finally . Now for some extras: At this time yesterday , you were worried about starting sentences. Following this , though, you will be an expert.

The four types of transitions

Now that you get the concept of transitions, let’s go back to that poorly written paragraph above and add some in to see what happens:

This morning , I went to the store. While I was there, I bought bacon and eggs. Then I saw someone I knew. So I said hello. After that , I went to the cashier. At that time , they checked me out. First , I paid. Next , I got my groceries. Following that , I went to my car. Finally , I returned home.

(Notice the use of commas after most of these transitions!)

This isn’t the best paragraph I’ve ever written. It still needs a lot of work. However, notice what a difference just adding transitions makes. This is something simple but effective you can start doing to make your sentences better today.

If you want to check your transition usage, try ProWritingAid’s Transitions report . You’ll see how many of each type of transition word you've used so you can pin-point where you might be losing your reader.

prowritingaid transitions report for essay

Sign up for a free ProWritingAid account to try it out.

What Are Some Linking Phrases I Can Use in My Essay?

As well as individual words, you can also use short phrases at the beginning of your sentences to transition between ideas. I just did it there— "As well as individual words" shows you how this section of the article is related to the last.

Here are some more phrases like this:

As shown in the example,

As a result of this,

After the meeting,

While this may be true,

Though researchers suggest X,

Before the war began,

Until we answer this question,

Since we cannot assume this to be true,

While some may claim Y,

Because we know that Z is true,

These short phrases are called dependent clauses . See how they all end with a comma? That's because they need you to add more information to make them into complete sentences.

  • While some may claim that chocolate is bad for you, data from a recent study suggests that it may have untapped health benefits .
  • Since we cannot assume that test conditions were consistent, it is impossible to reach a solid conclusion via this experiment .
  • As a result of this, critics disagree as to the symbolism of the yellow car in The Great Gatsby .

The bolded text in each example could stand on its own as a complete sentence. However, if we take away the first part of each sentence, we lose our connection to the other ideas in the essay.

These phrases are called dependent clauses : they depend on you adding another statement to the sentence to complete them. When you use a sentence starter phrase like the ones above in your writing, you signal that the new idea you have introduced completes (or disrupts) the idea before it.

Note: While some very short dependent clauses don’t need a comma, most do. Since it is not wrong to use one on even short ones (depending on the style guide being used), it is a good idea to include one every time.

Definition of a dependent clause

Along with missing transitions and repeating sentence structure, another thing that stops sentences from being great is too much repetition. Keep your sentences sharp and poignant by mixing up word choices to start your sentences.

You might start your sentence with a great word, but then you use that same word 17 sentences in a row. After the first couple, your sentences don’t sound as great. So, whether it is varying the transitional phrases you use or just mixing up the sentence openers in general, putting in some variety will only improve your sentences.

ProWritingAid lets you know if you’ve used the same word repeatedly at the start of your sentences so you can change it.

ProWritingAid's Repetition Report

The Repeats Report also shows you all of the repeats in your document. If you've used a sentence starter and then repeated it a couple of paragraphs down, the report will highlight it for you.

Try the Repeats Report with a free ProWritingAid account.

Now that you have your introduction sentences and body sentences taken care of, let’s talk a little about conclusion sentences. While you will still use transitions and clauses as in the body, there are some special considerations here.

Your conclusion is what people will remember most after they finish reading your paper. So, you want to make it stand out. Don’t just repeat yourself; tell them what they should do with what you just told them!

Use the tips from above, but also remember the following:

Be unique. Not only should you vary the words you use to start different sentences, but you should also think outside of the box. If you use the same conclusion sentence starter everyone else is using, your ideas will blend in too.

Be natural. Some of the best writing out there is writing that sounds natural. This goes for academic writing, too. While you won’t use phrases like "at the end of the day" in essay writing, stilted phrases like "in conclusion" can disrupt the flow you’ve created earlier on.

Here are some alternatives to "in conclusion" you could use in an essay:

  • To review, ... (best for scientific papers where you need to restate your key points before making your final statement)
  • As has been shown, ...
  • In the final analysis, ...
  • Taking everything into account, ...
  • On the whole, ...
  • Generally speaking, ...

If you’re looking for more ways to rephrase "in conclusion," take a look at our complete list of synonyms you can use.

in conclusion alternatives

There may not be a set word or words that you can use to make your sentences perfect. However, when you start using these tips, you’ll start to see noticeable improvement in your writing.

If you’ve ever heard people talk about pacing and flow in academic writing, and you have no idea what they mean or how to improve yours, then this is your answer. These tips will help your writing sound more natural, which is how you help your ideas flow.

Take your writing to the next level:

20 Editing Tips From Professional Writers

20 Editing Tips from Professional Writers

Whether you are writing a novel, essay, article, or email, good writing is an essential part of communicating your ideas., this guide contains the 20 most important writing tips and techniques from a wide range of professional writers..

sentence starters for comparison essay

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Check every email, essay, or story for grammar mistakes. Fix them before you press send.

Ashley Shaw is a former editor and marketer/current PhD student and teacher. When she isn't studying con artists for her dissertation, she's thinking of new ways to help college students better understand and love the writing process.

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How to Write a Comparison Essay

  • Introduction
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A comparison essay compares and contrasts two things. That is, it points out the similarities and differences (mostly focusing on the differences) of those two things. The two things usually belong to the same class (ex. two cities, two politicians, two sports, etc.). Relatively equal attention is given to the two subjects being compared. The essay may treat the two things objectively and impartially. Or it may be partial, favoring one thing over the other (ex. "American football is a sissy's game compared to rugby").

The important thing in any comparison essay is that the criteria for comparison should remain the same; that is,  the same attributes should be compared . For example, if you are comparing an electric bulb lamp with a gas lamp, compare them both according to their physical characteristics, their history of development, and their operation.

Narrow Your Focus (in this essay, as in any essay). For example, if you compare two religions, focus on  one  particular aspect which you can discuss in depth and detail, e.g., sin in Buddhism vs. sin in Christianity, or salvation in two religions. Or if your topic is political, you might compare the Conservative attitude to old growth logging vs. the Green Party's attitude to old growth logging, or the Conservative attitude to the Persian Gulf War vs. the NDP attitude to the same war.

Each paragraph should deal with only  one idea  and deal with it  thoroughly . Give  adequate explanation  and  specific examples  to support each idea. The first paragraph introduces the topic, captures the reader's attention, and provides a definite summary of the essay. It may be wise to end the first paragraph with a thesis statement that summarizes the main points of difference (or similarity). For example, "Submarines and warships differ not only in construction, but in their style of weapons and method of attack." This gives the reader a brief outline of your essay, allowing him to anticipate what's to come. Each middle paragraph should begin with a topic sentence that summarizes the main idea of that paragraph (ex. "The musical styles of Van Halen and Steely Dan are as differing in texture as are broken glass and clear water"). An opening sentence like this that uses a  metaphor  or  simile  not only summarizes the paragraph but captures the reader's attention, making him want to read on. Avoid a topic sentence that is too dull and too broad (ex. "There are many differences in the musical styles of Van Halen and Steely Dan").

VARY THE STRUCTURE

The  structure  of the comparison essay may vary. You may use  simultaneous comparison structure  in which the two things are compared together, feature by feature, point by point. For example, "The electric light bulb lasts 80 hours, while the gas lamp lasts only 20 hours . . . ." Or as in this example (comparing two American presidents):

Consider how perfectly Harding met the requirements for president. Wilson was a visionary who liked to identify himself with "forward-looking men"; Harding was as old-fashioned as those wooden Indians which used to stand in front of cigar stores, "a flower of the period before safety razors." Harding believed that statemanship had come to its apogee in the days of McKinley and Foraker. Wilson was cold. Harding was an affable small-town man, at ease with "folks"; he was an ideal companion to play poker with all Saturday night. Wilson had always been difficult of access; Harding was accessible to the last degree. etc.

Don't use simultaneous structure all the way through the essay, however. It becomes monotonous. Use it sparingly. For most of the essay, use  parallel order structure .

In  parallel order structure  you compare the two things separately but take up the same points in the same order. For example, you may spend half a paragraph on "thing A" and the other half of the paragraph on the corresponding characteristics of "thing B." Or, if you have enough material, devote one paragraph to the physical characteristics of an electric bulb lamp, and the next paragraph to the physical characteristics of the gas lamp.

Or say everything there is to say about the electric bulb lamp (its physical characteristics, history of development and operation), followed by everything there is to say about the gas lamp.

For the sake of variety  you may switch to simultaneous comparison at one point  in the essay, and then switch back to parallel order structure for the rest of the essay. In fact, there are many ways to structure a comparison essay; use whichever organization works best for your particular paper. Here are a few sample organizational methods. "A" stands for "thing A" (ex. electric lamp) and "B" stands for "thing B" (ex. gas lamp). Each number (1,2,3, etc.) stands for a different aspect of that thing (ex. physical characteristics, operation, history of development).

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helping students be successful writing a compare and contrast essay in 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade

Scaffolding a Compare and Contrast Essay With Frames and Templates

helping students be successful writing a compare and contrast essay in 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade

Writing can be hard and frustrating for upper elementary students; writing a compare and contrast essay can be even harder and more frustrating.

Often, this skill gets pushed to the back burner.  It is a lot easier to practice comparing and contrasting with things that take less time - like by using a Venn Diagram.  

However, teaching 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade students to compare and contrast topics within their writing is an important skill. Scaffolding student writing through sentence or paragraph frames and essay templates can minimize the frustration of students, save valuable time, and help your students become better writers.  Providing structure helps focus yoru students.

Below, find ideas for scaffolding so that your 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade students can be successful with comparing and contrasting in their writing - and eventually writing a compare and contrast essay!

Start Small - With Compare and Contrast Sentence Starters or Frames

Students don't have to write an entire essay every time you want them to practice comparing and contrasting within their writing - they can practice this skill by simply writing a sentence that compares or contrasts two things.

Providing students with sentence starters is a great way to ease them into using compare and contrast language in their writing.  This is especially beneficial for your ELL and low language students, but ALL of your students will benefit from this strategy.

Example Sentence Starters

1. __________ and __________ are different because __________.

2. __________ and __________ are alike because __________.

3. The most important difference between __________ and __________ is __________.

4. An important similarity between __________ and __________ is __________.

5.  While __________ and __________ are alike because __________, they have different __________.

Using a Paragraph Template or Frame

After students have been successful at writing sentences that compare and contrast, expand to short paragraphs. Provide scaffolding similar to the sentence frames to help your 3rd grade, 4th grade, or 5th grade students be successful.

Using scaffolding like this will not only help them with comparing and contrasting language, but will improve their overall writing as well.

(You might find some of these other writing tips and ideas helpful.)

Example Paragraph Frames

1. __________ and __________ have many differences. The most important difference is _________________________. Another difference is _________________________. Finally, _________________________.

2. __________ and __________ are similar in many ways. For example, ____________________. Furthermore, they both ____________________. A final similarity is ____________________.

3.  __________ and __________ are similar in some ways, but different in others.  For example, they both ____________________.  Despite this similarity, they are different because ____________________.  This difference is important because ____________________.

comparing and contrasting scaffolded essay template / outline for upper elementary

Compare and Contrast Essay Template / Structure / Outline

Writing an essay can be overwhelming.  Teachers often try to support students by modeling good essay writing - which is an essential step.  But having students go straight from having a compare and contrast essay modeled for them to writing their own independently can be a huge jump for some.  They are going straight from "I do" to "You do."

A scaffolded essay outline makes a good "we do" for upper elementary students.  Provide students with a scaffolded template that clearly lays out the structure of a good compare and contrast essay.  This helps students stay on topic and reminds them what a good compare and contrast essay should look like.

Eventually, you will take this scaffolding away.  Or, you can use the scaffolding to differentiate.  Provide more scaffolding for students that needed, while students have a good grasp might only have topic students scaffolded for them - or maybe even no scaffolding at all.

no prep scaffolded compare and contrast essay to help your 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade students be successful writers

If you know your students would benefit from this type of scaffolding, but don’t have the time to create it yourself, check out my Compare and Contrast Writing Resource.

It walks students through the writing process with scaffolding each step of the way. This resource also provides a model essay so that you can model expectations for your students. Plus, it can be used over and over again with different topics.

You might also like these other ideas for scaffolding your instruction, or these compare and contrast activities and ideas.  

Want a Compare and Contrast Freebie?

Free reading comprehension practice for third, fourth, and fifth graders - paired passages about Thomas Edison and Benjamin Franklin

Download these reading passages with a compare and contrast activity for free and use it to today!

I will try the strategy, seems easy to follow

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Academic Phrasebank

Academic Phrasebank

Compare and contrast.

  • GENERAL LANGUAGE FUNCTIONS
  • Being cautious
  • Being critical
  • Classifying and listing
  • Defining terms
  • Describing trends
  • Describing quantities
  • Explaining causality
  • Giving examples
  • Signalling transition
  • Writing about the past

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By understanding similarities and differences between two things, we can increase our understanding and learn more about both. This usually involves a process of analysis, in which we compare the specific parts as well as the whole. Comparison may also be a preliminary stage of evaluation. For example, by comparing specific aspects of A and B, we can decide which is more useful or valuable. Many paragraphs whose function is to compare or contrast will begin with an introductory sentence expressed in general terms.

Introducing differences

X is different from Y in a number of respects. X differs from Y in a number of important ways. There are a number of important differences between X and Y. Areas where significant differences have been found include X and Y. In contrast to earlier findings, however, no evidence of X was detected. A descriptive case study differs from an exploratory study in that it uses … Smith (2015) found dramatic differences in the rate of decline of X between Y and Z. Women and men differ not only in physical attributes but also in the way in which they … The nervous systems of Xs are significantly different from those of Ys in several key respects.

Introducing similarities

Both X and Y share a number of key features. There are a number of similarities between X and Y. The effects of X on human health are similar to those of Y. Both X and Y generally take place in a ‘safe environment’. These results are similar to those reported by (Smith et al. 1999). This definition is similar to that found in (Smith, 2001) who writes: The return rate is similar to that of comparable studies (e.g. Smith et al. 1999). The approach used in this investigation is similar to that used by other researchers. Studies have compared Xs in humans and animals and found that they are essentially identical.

Comparing within one sentence

Comparing within one sentence: comparative forms.

In the trial, women made more/fewer errors than men. Women tend to have greater/less verbal fluency than men. Women are more/less likely than men to perform well in tests. Women are more/less accurate in tests of target-directed motor skills. Women tend to perform better/worse than men on tests of perceptual speed. Women are faster/slower than men at certain precision manual tasks, such as … Women are more/less likely to suffer from X when the front part of the brain is damaged. The part of the brain connecting the two hemispheres may be more/less extensive in women.

Indicating difference across two sentences

Indicating similarity across two sentences.

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Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases to Use As Sentence Starters

Sentence Starters! When writing an essay in the English language , it is very important that your writing flows and sounds good. There are a variety of ways in which you can do this, one such way is by using sentence starters. In this article, we are going to be looking at some sentence starters which you can use as a way of creating much more interesting and engaging written work in English.

Table of Contents

Sentence Starters

What is a sentence starter.

In the most simple terms, a sentence starter is a phrase that is used at the beginning of a sentence and can introduce information contained within it. There are thousands of different sentence starters that you can choose and one of the most important rules is to avoid using the same words at the beginning of each sentence. This will allow you to create work that sounds much more interesting and not at all repetitive . You can achieve this by using the extensive list of sentence starters whenever you are writing an essay or other sort of work in English.

There are various ways of using sentence starters, so before we begin looking at some examples we are going to take a look at some useful tips for getting the most out of your sentence starters.

  • As we mentioned, avoid using the same word repeatedly at the start of multiple sentences.
  • Think about what type of sentence you are writing. Is it an information sentence? Does it ask a question? Does the sentence compare or contrast existing information? Is the sentence putting something in order? Does it conclude something? By working out the type of sentence it is, you will be able to better decide on your sentence starter.
  • You should also ask yourself how the sentence relates to the previous one. This will allow you to further choose a relevant sentence starter.
  • Once you have finished writing your essay, or other pieces of writing, it is very important that you go over it and make any necessary edits and adjustments. This will help you to make the most of sentence starters and ensure that there is no repetition and that each sentence starter has been sued correctly. You should initially write without thinking too much about it and then make changes when you edit.

Examples Of Sentence Starters

As we mentioned, there are thousands of sentence starters that you can use when writing in English, we are now going to look at some of the most common and useful ones. We will do this by category to better help you select the right one.

Introduction Sentence Starters

If your sentence is being used to introduce some information, you can use one of the following sentence starters.

  • The essay discusses…
  • In this essay/article/document…
  • The theme of this essay/article…
  • We will be discussing…

Conclusion Sentence Starters

When writing a concluding sentence, you might consider one of the following options.

  • In conclusion …
  • To summarise…
  • We have seen that…..
  • It has been demonstrated that…
  • To sum up…

Comparison and Contrast Sentence Starters

If you are writing a sentence to compare or contrast, then these sentence starters will get you off on the right foot.

  • However …
  • Nevertheless…
  • That being said…
  • Then again…
  • On the other hand …
  • Although…
  • In comparison…
  • Whereas…
  • On the one hand…
  • Other than…
  • Outside of…
  • Rather…
  • Still…

Cause And Result Sentence Starters

If you are looking to write a sentence which shows the result or cause then you might consider using one of the following sentence starters.

  • As a result…
  • For this reason…
  • For this purpose…
  • Otherwise…
  • Since…
  • So that/then…
  • Subsequently…
  • This means that…
  • Therefore …
  • That is why…
  • Because …
  • Due to the fact that…

Sentence Starters To Emphasise

When you are writing a sentence which requires a little emphasis, you could use one of these sentence starters to achieve that.

  • Above all…
  • As usual…
  • Generally speaking…
  • For the most part…
  • In this situation…
  • No doubt…
  • Obviously…
  • As a rule…
  • Especially…

Sentence Starters For Additional Ideas

When you are writing a sentence which will add new information, you might choose one of these sentence starters.

  • Furthermore …
  • Also …
  • Then…
  • In addition …
  • Moreover…
  • As well as…
  • Coupled with…
  • Another reason…
  • Indeed…
  • Identically…
  • Likewise…
  • Additionally …

Sentence Starters For Rare Or Common Ideas

When you are adding information which is either very common or extremely rare, you may want to indicate this within your sentence starter. This can be done in one of the following ways.

  • A few…
  • Rarely…
  • Unusually…..
  • Seldom…
  • On occasion…
  • Quite often…

Inconclusive Sentence Starters

If you are presenting information which is not conclusive, you could use one of these sentence starters.

  • Perhaps…
  • There is some evidence to suggest that…
  • It may be…
  • It could be…
  • It is possible that…

Sentence Starters To Show Examples

When you are writing a sentence which will give an example of something, there are many sentence starters you could use. Let’s take a look at some of these now.

  • For example …
  • Such as…
  • For instance…
  • As an example…
  • You might consider…
  • For one thing…
  • As an illustration…
  • To illustrate this…
  • Markedly…
  • In this case…
  • This can be seen…
  • Specifically…

Sentence Starters To Show Time And Order

If you need to show order or time within a sentence then you should use one of these sentence starters to do this.

  • Firstly, secondly, thirdly…
  • Earlier…
  • Afterwards…
  • First of all…
  • Finally…
  • In addition…
  • In the first instance…
  • After this…
  • Additionally…
  • With this in mind…
  • To begin with…

Learn more with the useful list of transition words in English.

Using a well-selected sentence starter when writing an essay in the English language can bring many benefits. It will allow you to create a piece of writing which is coherent, interesting and above all, diverse. It will depend greatly on the type of sentence that you are writing as to which sentence starter you use and using a good variety within your essay will make it much more engaging for the reader. Once you have finished writing, it is a good idea to go back over your work and check that your sentence starters make sense and are being used correctly.

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Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases to Use As Sentence Starters For Writing Essay

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18 thoughts on “Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases to Use As Sentence Starters”

It helps keep in memory how to start, to go on, and to finish an essay.

Great to use across content areas. We could be more intentional during math with using them.

Really good great for writing

Hallo, thank you for this article, I like it. And can you help me? Give me more information about the reference books from this article. Because, I need books from sentence starters strategy for my research in college.

Thanks it’s realy helpful

I LOVE BOLT CUTTERS!!!!!!

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Comparative Essay

Barbara P

How to Write a Comparative Essay – A Complete Guide

10 min read

Published on: Jan 28, 2020

Last updated on: Nov 21, 2023

Comparative Essay

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Comparative essay is a common assignment for school and college students. Many students are not aware of the complexities of crafting a strong comparative essay. 

If you too are struggling with this, don't worry!

In this blog, you will get a complete writing guide for comparative essay writing. From structuring formats to creative topics, this guide has it all.

So, keep reading!

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What is a Comparative Essay?

A comparative essay is a type of essay in which an essay writer compares at least two or more items. The author compares two subjects with the same relation in terms of similarities and differences depending on the assignment.

The main purpose of the comparative essay is to:

  • Highlight the similarities and differences in a systematic manner.
  • Provide great clarity of the subject to the readers.
  • Analyze two things and describe their advantages and drawbacks.

A comparative essay is also known as compare and contrast essay or a comparison essay. It analyzes two subjects by either comparing them, contrasting them, or both. The Venn diagram is the best tool for writing a paper about the comparison between two subjects.  

Moreover, a comparative analysis essay discusses the similarities and differences of themes, items, events, views, places, concepts, etc. For example, you can compare two different novels (e.g., The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and The Red Badge of Courage).

However, a comparative essay is not limited to specific topics. It covers almost every topic or subject with some relation.

Comparative Essay Structure

A good comparative essay is based on how well you structure your essay. It helps the reader to understand your essay better. 

The structure is more important than what you write. This is because it is necessary to organize your essay so that the reader can easily go through the comparisons made in an essay.

The following are the two main methods in which you can organize your comparative essay.

Point-by-Point Method 

The point-by-point or alternating method provides a detailed overview of the items that you are comparing. In this method, organize items in terms of similarities and differences.

This method makes the writing phase easy for the writer to handle two completely different essay subjects. It is highly recommended where some depth and detail are required.

Below given is the structure of the point-by-point method. 

Block Method 

The block method is the easiest as compared to the point-by-point method. In this method, you divide the information in terms of parameters. It means that the first paragraph compares the first subject and all their items, then the second one compares the second, and so on.

However, make sure that you write the subject in the same order. This method is best for lengthy essays and complicated subjects.

Here is the structure of the block method. 

Therefore, keep these methods in mind and choose the one according to the chosen subject.

Mixed Paragraphs Method

In this method, one paragraph explains one aspect of the subject. As a writer, you will handle one point at a time and one by one. This method is quite beneficial as it allows you to give equal weightage to each subject and help the readers identify the point of comparison easily.

How to Start a Comparative Essay?

Here, we have gathered some steps that you should follow to start a well-written comparative essay.  

Choose a Topic

The foremost step in writing a comparative essay is to choose a suitable topic.

Choose a topic or theme that is interesting to write about and appeals to the reader. 

An interesting essay topic motivates the reader to know about the subject. Also, try to avoid complicated topics for your comparative essay. 

Develop a List of Similarities and Differences 

Create a list of similarities and differences between two subjects that you want to include in the essay. Moreover, this list helps you decide the basis of your comparison by constructing your initial plan. 

Evaluate the list and establish your argument and thesis statement .

Establish the Basis for Comparison 

The basis for comparison is the ground for you to compare the subjects. In most cases, it is assigned to you, so check your assignment or prompt.

Furthermore, the main goal of the comparison essay is to inform the reader of something interesting. It means that your subject must be unique to make your argument interesting.  

Do the Research 

In this step, you have to gather information for your subject. If your comparative essay is about social issues, historical events, or science-related topics, you must do in-depth research.    

However, make sure that you gather data from credible sources and cite them properly in the essay.

Create an Outline

An essay outline serves as a roadmap for your essay, organizing key elements into a structured format.

With your topic, list of comparisons, basis for comparison, and research in hand, the next step is to create a comprehensive outline. 

Here is a standard comparative essay outline:

How to Write a Comparative Essay?

Now that you have the basic information organized in an outline, you can get started on the writing process. 

Here are the essential parts of a comparative essay: 

Comparative Essay Introduction 

Start off by grabbing your reader's attention in the introduction . Use something catchy, like a quote, question, or interesting fact about your subjects. 

Then, give a quick background so your reader knows what's going on. 

The most important part is your thesis statement, where you state the main argument , the basis for comparison, and why the comparison is significant.

This is what a typical thesis statement for a comparative essay looks like:

Comparative Essay Body Paragraphs 

The body paragraphs are where you really get into the details of your subjects. Each paragraph should focus on one thing you're comparing.

Start by talking about the first point of comparison. Then, go on to the next points. Make sure to talk about two to three differences to give a good picture.

After that, switch gears and talk about the things they have in common. Just like you discussed three differences, try to cover three similarities. 

This way, your essay stays balanced and fair. This approach helps your reader understand both the ways your subjects are different and the ways they are similar. Keep it simple and clear for a strong essay.

Comparative Essay Conclusion

In your conclusion , bring together the key insights from your analysis to create a strong and impactful closing.

Consider the broader context or implications of the subjects' differences and similarities. What do these insights reveal about the broader themes or ideas you're exploring?

Discuss the broader implications of these findings and restate your thesis. Avoid introducing new information and end with a thought-provoking statement that leaves a lasting impression.

Below is the detailed comparative essay template format for you to understand better.

Comparative Essay Format

Comparative Essay Examples

Have a look at these comparative essay examples pdf to get an idea of the perfect essay.

Comparative Essay on Summer and Winter

Comparative Essay on Books vs. Movies

Comparative Essay Sample

Comparative Essay Thesis Example

Comparative Essay on Football vs Cricket

Comparative Essay on Pet and Wild Animals

Comparative Essay Topics

Comparative essay topics are not very difficult or complex. Check this list of essay topics and pick the one that you want to write about.

  • How do education and employment compare?
  • Living in a big city or staying in a village.
  • The school principal or college dean.
  • New Year vs. Christmas celebration.
  • Dried Fruit vs. Fresh. Which is better?
  • Similarities between philosophy and religion.
  • British colonization and Spanish colonization.
  • Nuclear power for peace or war?
  • Bacteria or viruses.
  • Fast food vs. homemade food.

Tips for Writing A Good Comparative Essay

Writing a compelling comparative essay requires thoughtful consideration and strategic planning. Here are some valuable tips to enhance the quality of your comparative essay:

  • Clearly define what you're comparing, like themes or characters.
  • Plan your essay structure using methods like point-by-point or block paragraphs.
  • Craft an introduction that introduces subjects and states your purpose.
  • Ensure an equal discussion of both similarities and differences.
  • Use linking words for seamless transitions between paragraphs.
  • Gather credible information for depth and authenticity.
  • Use clear and simple language, avoiding unnecessary jargon.
  • Dedicate each paragraph to a specific point of comparison.
  • Summarize key points, restate the thesis, and emphasize significance.
  • Thoroughly check for clarity, coherence, and correct any errors.

Transition Words For Comparative Essays

Transition words are crucial for guiding your reader through the comparative analysis. They help establish connections between ideas and ensure a smooth flow in your essay. 

Here are some transition words and phrases to improve the flow of your comparative essay:

Transition Words for Similarities

  • Correspondingly
  • In the same vein
  • In like manner
  • In a similar fashion
  • In tandem with

Transition Words for Differences

  • On the contrary
  • In contrast
  • Nevertheless
  • In spite of
  • Notwithstanding
  • On the flip side
  • In contradistinction

Check out this blog listing more transition words that you can use to enhance your essay’s coherence!

In conclusion, now that you have the important steps and helpful tips to write a good comparative essay, you can start working on your own essay. 

However, if you find it tough to begin, you can always hire our professional essay writing service . 

Our skilled writers can handle any type of essay or assignment you need. So, don't wait—place your order now and make your academic journey easier!

Frequently Asked Question

How long is a comparative essay.

A comparative essay is 4-5 pages long, but it depends on your chosen idea and topic.

How do you end a comparative essay?

Here are some tips that will help you to end the comparative essay.

  • Restate the thesis statement
  • Wrap up the entire essay
  • Highlight the main points

Barbara P (Literature, Marketing)

Dr. Barbara is a highly experienced writer and author who holds a Ph.D. degree in public health from an Ivy League school. She has worked in the medical field for many years, conducting extensive research on various health topics. Her writing has been featured in several top-tier publications.

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Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases You Can Use As Sentence Starters

Posted on Last updated: October 24, 2023

Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases You Can Use As Sentence Starters

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Sentence Starters! Here you will find a useful list of common sentence starters that you can use in a discussion as well as in essay writing. Learn these sentence starters to improve your English speaking and writing skills.

Table of Contents

Sentence Starters

Sentence starters | common phrases.

  • (The topic) has fostered a debate on …
  • A sensible idea would be to…
  • We all know that…
  • It is said that…
  • It is believed that…
  • People assumed that…
  • There is growing support for the notion that …
  • The data gathered in the study strongly suggests that …
  • The supposition drawn from this being that…
  • Leading to the supposition that…
  • This can be argued that..
  • The source suggest…
  • My own feeling on the subject is that …
  • Generally speaking…
  • As far as I know…
  • As far as I am concerned…
  • I believe that…
  • The focus of discussion in this paper is …
  • The premise of (the topic) seems to be based on …
  • Latest research corroborates the view that …
  • Most people would agree that…
  • It is estimated…
  • The reader supposed that…
  • It is clear that…
  • Everybody knows that…
  • Surely you would agree that…
  • This clearly shows that…
  • I discovered…
  • We always…
  • This indicates…
  • Demonstrating that…
  • It is vital that…
  • It wouldn’t be very difficult to…
  • The real truth is that…
  • Are we expected that…
  • The fact is that…
  • I felt as…
  • I think/ I believe that…
  • It seems to me that…
  • We concluded that…
  • My perspective is…
  • I agree with…
  • Have you thought about…
  • In other words…
  • I see what you mean but…
  • I share your point of view on…
  • In my opinion…

Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases You Can Use As Sentence Starters

Transition Words Used as Sentence Starters

Words to add an idea

  • In addition to
  • For instance
  • For example
  • As an example
  • Additionally
  • Furthermore
  • Another reason
  • Coupled with
  • Correspondingly
  • In addition
  • Identically
  • One other thing

Words that show cause

  • Accordingly
  • As a result
  • Consequently
  • For this reason
  • For this purpose
  • Subsequently
  • This is why
  • Following this
  • As you can see
  • For all of those reasons

Words that show contrast

  • Comparatively
  • Different from
  • Even though
  • However ( however synonyms )
  • In comparison
  • Nevertheless
  • In contrast
  • On the one hand…
  • On the other hand
  • On the contrary

Words that add emphasis

  • Generally speaking
  • For the most part
  • In this situation
  • No doubt (undoubtedly)
  • Particularly
  • Unquestionably

Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases You Can Use As Sentence Starters

Sentence Starters | Infographic

Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases You Can Use As Sentence Starters

ALIYI Ahmad

Sunday 30th of April 2023

This great gift thank you forever

Wednesday 7th of December 2022

thank that helped m out alot

Thursday 1st of December 2022

Amazing list. It helps change up how you start your sentence, and it helps for writers to keep readers engaged.

Friday 27th of May 2022

so i think that there should be more expansion so we can tell the reader a bit more about what is happening

Wednesday 6th of April 2022

i like his book

Sentence Starters | Uses, List of Sentence Starters to Emphasis, to Show Examples, Time and Order

Sentence Starters: When you write something, be it an essay, article, or some blog, it is important that you make it as engaging as possible. And this comes down to one basic yet very important element, Sentence Starters. When you start reading something, the first line has a huge impact on your mind, which sets the mood for the entire essay or article.

In this article, we will explain what exactly sentence starters are, when to use them, the benefits of using them, some common sentence starters depending on situations, what makes good sentence starters, and the words to use as a sentence starter to make your work more appealing.

Common Sentence Starters

What are sentence starters, when to use sentence starters, why use sentence starters, list of introductory sentence starters.

  • List of Concluding Sentence Starters

List of Comparison and Contrast Sentence Starters

List of causes and results related sentence starters, list of sentence starters to emphasise.

  • List Sentence Starters for Additional Ideas

List of Sentence Starters to Show Examples

List of sentence starters to show time and order.

Sentence starters are certain words or phrases that precede the rest of the sentence and are usually separated by commas. Some of the most important words in writing are those that begin a sentence. They introduce the topic of the sentence, so the reader knows what to expect.

Sentence starters are critical in longer texts for uniting the entire piece. Because each sentence essentially has its distinct subject, these compositions frequently, and sometimes abruptly, move from point to point. Sentence starters aid the reader’s experience by smoothing out abrupt transitions and preparing the reader for the next topic.

Although sentence starters are frequent in fiction, they are most beneficial in nonfiction, particularly essay writing. While fiction unites the writing through the plot, nonfiction frequently integrates a range of facts, serving as sentence starters. In other words, if you believe nonfiction is boring, envision it as a list of points.

Sentence starters are not required for all sentences. Employing them too frequently can cause your reader to become distracted. Here are some examples of when a sentence starter works best:

  • When it’s unclear how one statement relates to another.
  • When introducing a new topic, such as at the start of an essay or paragraph.
  • When a sentence necessitates additional context, such as background information.
  • When you believe it’s important to emphasise a specific sentence or topic.
  • When delivering a conclusion or summary, such as at the end of an essay.
  • When you want to write a hook that will entice readers.

There are a few reasons why sentence starters help you to enhance your writing skills. Following are certain reasons why one should use sentence starters in your writings:

  • Instead of the usual practice of constructing simple subject-verb sentence structure, it helps you come up with more subtle and richer ideas.
  • When you use transitions and good opening words, you can more effectively link the concepts in your writings.
  • Your work will be different from others if you use transitional and linking words successfully at every appropriate point.
  • When you employ transition sentence starters, your ideas and notions become more coherent.

Sentence Starters 1

In this essay/article/document…

Example: In this essay, we will discuss the harmful effects that social media can have on your daily life.

In this paper…

Example: In this paper, we have presented thorough research of how the online gaming community has given rise to professional gamers worldwide.

The essay discusses…

Example: The essay discusses the pros and cons of being a freelancer.

The subject of discussion…

Example: The subject of discussion here is how online media has given rise to new professionals in the field of marketing.

The theme of this essay/article…

Example: The theme of this article revolves around the boom of platforms like Netflix among the youngsters.

We will be discussing…

Example: We will be discussing the health benefits of a morning routine.

List of Conclusion Sentence Starters

Example: Finally, I would like to introduce the core team of the event, without whom this entire event would be nothing.

Example: Hence, we can see that most players need to have a proper amount of rest before any major games.

In conclusion…

Example: In conclusion, I would like to thank everyone for turning up for this charity event.

In rounding up…

Example: In rounding up today’s discussion, we can conclude that most of us have not been satisfied with the new set of rules.

In summary…

Example: In summary, the team has been doing good with the current set of starting players. A few peaks here and there can make the team even better.

It has been demonstrated that…

Example: It has been demonstrated that the market is likely to demand more from us with the rise of this pandemic.

Example: Lastly, let’s put a toast to all of us present here, trying to bring about a change in the world.

To conclude…

Example: To conclude, we would like to say that to create good blogs, you need to understand your target audience as they are the most important part of your blogs.

Example: To sum up, we will start with our training this Sunday and follow it throughout the week with Wednesday as our rest day.

To summarise…

Example: To summarise this debate, it is clear that there is a need to change the team’s work.

We have seen that…

Example: We have seen that teenagers are more attracted to video games than playing outside these days.

Alternatively, …

Example: Alternatively, if you do not wish to take the bus, we can arrange a private cab for you.

Example: Although we don’t talk often, you should know that I’ll be there for you whenever you need any help.

Complementary to…

Example: Complementary to the premium package, you also get access to the lounges across all the locations that we will visit.

Contrary to…

Example: Contrary to what I said yesterday, I think it’ll be a good idea to invest in new products now.

Despite/ in spite of…

Example: Despite being one of the finest players on the team, the coach did not want him to captain the team.

Differing from…

Example: Differing from Maria’s point, Rose argued that it was completely unnecessary to invite so many guests to her birthday.

Example: Even so, no one looked surprised by the announcement of his resignation.

Example: However, I would suggest not working out for more than 2 hours at a stretch.

In comparison…

Example: In comparison, we can see that both the products have the same features, a few better than the other on each device.

In contrast…

Example: In contrast to what he said earlier, I guess his new idea makes much more sense.

In the same manner…

Example: In the same manner, we can get a good deal if we approach the sponsors now.

Just like before…

Example: Just like before, you need to be very careful while working with these circular edges.

Nevertheless…

Example: Nevertheless, the team was happy with their effort and did not regret much about the loss.

Nonetheless…

Example: Nonetheless, it’ll be good if you can come down to see him.

On the contrary…

Example: On the contrary, John decided to take a drop-year before deciding to do his Masters.

On the other hand, …

Example: On the other hand, this bad is expensive, and not everyone might be willing to buy this for just one or two short trips.

Other than…

Example: Other than making it flat, we should also make sure to fit it right in the middle of the rack.

Example: Rather than agreeing to join us, he decided to go for a solo trip.

Similarly, …

Example: Similarly, you can use our product to clean other household accessories as well.

Example: Still, more than 50% of the students did not turn up for the event.

That being said…

Example: That being said, I want you to remember that it is not always about the facilities that a car gives. Safety is a big thing to be kept in mind.

Then again…

Example: Then again, not everyone can run that fast in the team.

Example: Unlike the other products, this one is completely hydraulic, making it easier to operate.

Example: Whereas, if he could just do this independently, it would make things much easier for him.

Accordingly, …

Example: Accordingly, everyone in the class wore the same dress code, making them stand out from the rest of the school.

As a result, …

Example: As a result, none of us can take part in the match.

As you can see…

Example: As you can see, it is convenient and very much aesthetically pleasing to the eyes.

Example: Because of the reasons mentioned above, the committee has decided not to host the annual sports day this year.

Due to the fact that…

Example: Due to the fact that we did not have enough members on our team, we were disqualified.

Example: Due to such bad weather conditions, all roads have been closed around the valley.

Following this…

Example: Following this, you should make sure to get everything in place to see that all of it fits properly.

For all of those reasons…

Example: For all of those reasons, she is not willing to join us for the trip.

For this purpose, …

Example: For this purpose, I did not want anyone to know about this.

For this reason, …

Example: For this reason, I did not go with the team.

Example: Otherwise, everyone else seems to agree with the team captain.

Example: Since only a few of us turned up for the event, they postponed it to the next Friday.

So that…

Example: So that, even if you don’t get all the things, you have something in backup for tomorrow’s show.

Example: So then you will not have to worry about losing your earphones all the time.

Example: So, we decided to give him a surprise once he comes back from the trip.

That is why…

Example: That is why you should always inform your parents about your whereabouts.

Example: Therefore, do not make any changes to the article unless you are asked to do so.

This is why…

Example: This is why you should always have the safety gear before trying to skate.

This means that…

Example: This means that as time goes, the prices should drop down to a reasonable level.

Example: Thus, we decided to go hiking this weekend.

Example: Above all, everyone must be following the safety protocols during the trip.

Absolutely…

Example: Absolutely, the more work you put in, the better will be the results.

As a rule, …

Example: As a rule of thumb, always start from the easiest and follow up to the hardest ones.

Example: As usual, you must make sure that everyone reaches home in time.

Example: Certainly, some will not be happy with the decision, but you can’t please everyone.

Example: Clearly, he was not the one to damage the cars.

Definitely…

Example: Definitely, you should always check for anything you might have left behind before leaving the hotel room.

Especially…

Example: Especially, with both of them around, the team feels much more confident about the game.

For the most part…

Example: For the most part, you will just have to rely on your instincts.

Generally speaking, …

Example: Generally speaking, not everyone has the facility to be trained under a personal coach.

Example: Granted that you can keep up with the grades, I do not have any problem with you playing.

Importantly…

Example: Importantly, everyone must fill the form before leaving the workshop.

In this situation…

Example: In this situation, only a few of us can move forward with the ball.

Example: Indeed, when it comes to cricket, there is no one better than Tyler.

It should be noted…

Example: It should be noted that all of these are being done by experts, and no one should try these at home.

Example: Never try to put someone down just because you cannot agree on terms with them.

No doubt (undoubtedly)…

Example: No doubt, he has worked hard before this competition.

Example: Obviously, only a few of us can make it through to the next round.

Example: Of course, the entire team has to be there for the prize distribution.

Particularly…

Example: Particularly, all the teachers were more focused on the exams rather than taking the classes.

Positively…

Example: Positively, everyone should ensure that they bring all the necessary items to the competition.

Example: Usually, more members turn up for the Sunday Barbeque.

Without a doubt…

Example: Without a doubt, James is going to make it through the test.

List of Sentence Starters for Additional Ideas

Additionally, ….

Example: Additionally, you can also add a bit of tomato to give it a tangy taste.

Example: Again, not everyone has to do this process. It is just a suggestion as it makes things much more organised.

Along with…

Example: Along with the test papers, we also have to start with our research work.

Example: Also, not all of us are as good as you in painting.

Another reason…

Example: Another reason I left is that I did not feel like I could grow in the team.

As an example…

Example: As an example, you can look at the first two methods and see that it mostly talks about mental health and stability rather than physical power.

Coupled with…

Example: Coupled with chocolate syrup, nothing can taste as good as pancakes.

Furthermore…

Example: Furthermore, we can see that most of us are much more comfortable using a laptop than a desktop.

Identically…

Example: Identically, you can choose the other product to give the room some different kinds of lightings.

In addition to…

Example: In addition to what Josh said, we all must start looking into our expenses.

Example: In fact, most of us did not have any intention to join the team.

Likewise, …

Example: Likewise, if you can develop a good marketing strategy, nothing can stop you from booming in the market.

Example: Moreover, you must know what you want to do with this in the future.

Example: Similarly, many were clueless and did not know where to start.

Example: Whereas, only a few of us know how to ride bikes.

Example: As an example, you can see that the room at the corner has much smaller windows than the ones here.

As an illustration…

Example: As an illustration, you can see that it looks pretty small but does most of the job that you want it for.

Example: Especially with Vic around, everyone had much more confidence.

For example, …

Example: For example, you cannot just approach clients in simple ways and expect them to hire you for their work.

For instance, …

Example: For instance, not everyone is good with words, but the way you speak can also impact.

In this case…

Example: In this case, we cannot just ask one of our executives to go and look at the problem.

Specifically, …

Example: Specifically, I want you to look for minimalistic designs. They look much more attractive, in my opinion.

This can be seen…

Example: This can be seen as the perfect example for a hydraulic motor.

To illustrate this…

Example: To illustrate this in simple terms, point A and B is where the main force is applied, which helps you to lift the heavy containers.

You might consider…

Example: You might consider looking for some pet-friendly cafes.

Sentence Starters 2

Example: Additionally, only a few more tweaks can make this drone completely unusable.

After this…

Example: After this, you can add salt to your taste and stir it a little.

Afterwards…

Example: Afterwards, get those lights and arrange them on that corner shelf.

Example: Currently, we are not accepting any coupons.

Example: During our mid-terms, only a few students were able to find an internship.

Example: Earlier, the authorities had assured us of all the compensations we would get during the lockdown.

Eventually…

Example: Eventually, you will end up in debt if you keep spending your money like this.

Example: Finally, add some cheese to garnish the pasta, and it is ready to be served.

First of all, …

Example: First of all, look for bags with comfortable and sturdy grips.

Example: First, let us look into the basics of computers.

In addition, …

Example: In addition to the points mentioned above, you should note that the first impression is the last, so make sure to look at your best.

In the first instance…

Example: In the first instance, the object does not move because of friction.

Example: Lastly, let us look into the pros and cons of having a rugged camera.

Example: Later, only a few students turned up for the extra class.

To begin with…

Example: To begin with, I want you all to know that I’m not some kind of teacher of any sort, so pardon me if I’m not able to explain the things in easy words.

With this in mind…

Example: With this in mind, we all made sure to carry all the necessary items for the camping.

In conclusion, we can see that sentence starters helps a lot to make your essays and articles more coherent, engaging, interesting and diversified. However, you must keep in mind that the sentence starter will depend on the type of sentence you are writing. Make your choices wisely and check whether the ones you are using make sense or not.

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COMMENTS

  1. 101 Great Compare and Contrast Sentence Starters

    Compare and contrast sentence starters are exactly what you need in order to write a good comparison essay. A compare/contrast essay takes two ideas and compares plus contrasts them. The purpose of this type of writing is to explain subtle differences between two concepts.

  2. What Are Good Sentence Starters for Essays?

    We explain a bit about when and how to use them, and then give specific examples of sentence starters you can use in your writing, divided into categories for quick reference like "topic sentence starters for essays" or "good sentence starters for emphasis." Here's a tip: Want to make sure your writing shines?

  3. How to compare texts

    A comparison response still follows the basic essay structure: ... Sentence starters. ... When comparing texts, you are making a point about two different texts, backing up ideas with evidence and ...

  4. How to Start a Compare and Contrast Essay on the Right Foot

    March 11, 2019 What is it about compare and contrast essays that makes them so difficult to get started? Maybe it's having to juggle two different subjects in one essay. Usually you set your sights on one topic and tackle it directly. However, with a compare and contrast essay, you have to tackle two subjects.

  5. Sentence Starters ⇒ Words and Phrases to Start Sentences

    Place an order 5-7 minutes Choose a writer 2-4 minutes Receive your paper always on time Receive any Essay in up to 6 Hours When sentence starters are used You don't have to use them in every sentence, but they can be helpful if you feel like your ideas are choppy or you want to connect two thoughts.

  6. Comparing and Contrasting in an Essay

    In the block method, you cover each of the overall subjects you're comparing in a block. You say everything you have to say about your first subject, then discuss your second subject, making comparisons and contrasts back to the things you've already said about the first. Your text is structured like this: Subject 1.

  7. How to Start a Compare and Contrast Essay: Build the Framework

    Udemy Editor. In order to understand how to start an essay, you must first have a full understanding of what you're going to be writing about. In a compare and contrast essay, you are discussing both the similarities and the differences between two subjects. While you may be someone who can start an essay off of the top of your head with no ...

  8. Comparison and Contrast Guide

    Overview This interactive guide provides an introduction to the basic characteristics and resources that are typically used when students compose comparison and contrast essays. The Comparison and Contrast Guide includes an overview, definitions and examples.

  9. Compare and Contrast Essays: The Ultimate Guide

    First things first: You need to choose which subjects you're comparing. This isn't always easy, especially if you have to pick the subjects on your own. For inspiration, here are some compare-and-contrast essay example topics: Opposing options for a certain category fossil fuels and renewable resources Coca-Cola and Pepsi

  10. Sentence Starters: Ultimate List to Improve Your Essays and Writing

    If you want to start writing terrific sentences (and improve your essay structure ), the first thing you should do is start using transition words. Transition words are those words or phrases that help connect thoughts and ideas. They move one sentence or paragraph into another, and they make things feel less abrupt.

  11. 4.1: Introduction to Comparison and Contrast Essay

    Comparison and contrast is simply telling how two things are alike or different. The compare-and-contrast essay starts with a thesis that clearly states the two subjects that are to be compared, contrasted, or both. The thesis should focus on comparing, contrasting, or both. A compare-and-contrast essay analyzes two subjects by either comparing ...

  12. Introduction

    A comparison essay compares and contrasts two things. That is, it points out the similarities and differences (mostly focusing on the differences) of those two things. The two things usually belong to the same class (ex. two cities, two politicians, two sports, etc.). Relatively equal attention is given to the two subjects being compared.

  13. PDF Sentence starters, transitional and other useful words

    Below is a list of possible sentence starters, transitional and other words that may be useful. To introduce examples ... To conclude It has been shown that, ... In short, ... To compare and contrast To give examples To add ideas Then again, ... Firstly, ... secondly, ... thirdly, ... To elaborate, ... finally, ... To show relationships or outcome

  14. Scaffolding a Compare and Contrast Essay With Frames and Templates

    It is a lot easier to practice comparing and contrasting with things that take less time - like by using a Venn Diagram. However, teaching 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade students to compare and contrast topics within their writing is an important skill. Scaffolding student writing through sentence or paragraph frames and essay templates can minimize ...

  15. Academic Phrasebank

    This usually involves a process of analysis, in which we compare the specific parts as well as the whole. Comparison may also be a preliminary stage of evaluation. For example, by comparing specific aspects of A and B, we can decide which is more useful or valuable. Many paragraphs whose function is to compare or contrast will begin with an ...

  16. Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases to Use As Sentence ...

    Last updated on October 18, 2023 by 7ESL 15.9k Sentence Starters! When writing an essay in the English language, it is very important that your writing flows and sounds good. There are a variety of ways in which you can do this, one such way is by using sentence starters.

  17. Comparative Essay

    A comparative essay is a type of essay in which an essay writer compares at least two or more items. The author compares two subjects with the same relation in terms of similarities and differences depending on the assignment. The main purpose of the comparative essay is to: Highlight the similarities and differences in a systematic manner.

  18. Paragraph Starters for Essays

    A good sentence starter is one that easily indicates what the tone and layout of the paragraph is going to be. If the paragraph is going to be a compare and contrast style of content,...

  19. Sentence Starters: Useful Words and Phrases You Can Use As Sentence

    Here you will find a useful list of common sentence starters that you can use in a discussion as well as in essay writing. Learn these sentence starters to improve your English speaking and writing skills. Table of Contents Sentence Starters Sentence Starters | Common Phrases Transition Words Used as Sentence Starters

  20. Sentence Starters

    List of Comparison and Contrast Sentence Starters ... In conclusion, we can see that sentence starters helps a lot to make your essays and articles more coherent, engaging, interesting and diversified. However, you must keep in mind that the sentence starter will depend on the type of sentence you are writing. Make your choices wisely and check ...

  21. Compare And Contrast Sentence Starters./ 24/7

    Compare and contrast phrases and structure are used to introduce ideas, to conclude, or to add ideas. In addition, one can use to compare and contrast phrases to present uncommon or rare ideas. Compare, and contrast can be complementary be used in a single sentence. They are either used to introduce disputes or give a comment on a particular ...

  22. Sentence starters for compare and contrast

    Sentence Starters For Compare And Contrast Teaching Resources | TPT Compare and Contrast Sentence Starters Winter Language and Social Language Activity BUNDLE for Speech Therapy 2RL.9 Compare and Contrast Two Versions of Little Red Riding Hood TPT empowers educators to teach at their best.

  23. Compare And Contrast Sentence Starters Teaching Resources

    Compare And Contrast Sentence Starters Teaching Resources | TPT her neighbors are alike different. Included in this packet: EFL - ESL - ELD Word Detective/Menu of Delicious Words or letter patterns. Students create their own menu of words to be used in future activities such as "Cooking Up Words".