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Reported Speech Quiz

Test your understanding of Reported Speech in English with this Reported Speech Quiz. Reported Speech, also known as indirect speech, is used to convey what someone else said without quoting their exact words. It often involves changes in tense, pronouns, and time expressions to suit the reporting context. For example, direct speech: “ I am learning English, ” becomes in reported speech: “ She said she was learning English. ” This quiz has 15 questions and each question will ask you to change the direct speech into reported speech. Take The Quiz Below!

Direct: "I am watching a movie." Reported: She said that she __________ a movie.

Direct: "I will go to the store." Reported: He said that he __________ to the store.

Direct: "We have finished our homework." Reported: They said that they __________ their homework.

Direct: "I can play the piano." Reported: She said that she __________ the piano.

Direct: "I am going to watch a movie tonight." Reported: He said that he __________ a movie that night.

Direct: "We are meeting our friends tomorrow." Reported: They said that they __________ their friends the next day.

Direct: "I have been reading a book." Reported: She said that she __________ a book.

Direct: "I ate pizza last night." Reported: He said that he __________ pizza the night before.

Direct: "We will finish the project by tomorrow." Reported: They said that they __________ the project by the next day.

Direct: "I saw him yesterday." Reported: She said that she __________ him the day before.

Direct: "I must leave now." Reported: He said that he __________ right away.

Direct: "We can't come to the party." Reported: They said that they __________ to the party.

Direct: "I did not see him at the event." Reported: She said that she __________ him at the event.

Direct: "I have been feeling unwell." Reported: He said that he __________ unwell.

Direct: "We were planning to visit you." Reported: They said that they __________ to visit you.

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Not learned about reported speech yet? Then check out this Reported Speech Guide which includes lots of examples to help you master this important part of English grammar.

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ESL Activities

ESL Games, Activities, Lesson Plans, Jobs & More

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Reported Speech Games, Activities, Worksheets and Lesson Plans

If you’re looking for some of the best reported speech games and activities, then you’re certainly in the right place. Keep on reading for our top picks, along with worksheets, lesson plans and more.

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Reported speech activities

ESL Reported Speech Games

Let’s get into the best activities and games for English learners.

#1: Reported Speech Board Game

I love to play board games in real life which is why I also like to play them with my students! It’s super easy to make your own to use for just about any grammatical point, including this concept.

In this case, fill the board with a bunch of statements like the following:

  • Sister-has boyfriend
  • Friend-fired from job
  • Dad-playing golf tomorrow

Then, students have to make a reported speech statement using the information. It’s fun, engaging and a nice way to give students some practice with this important concept.

Check out this simple ESL board game so you can see how easy it is to make your own:

ESL Board Game .

#2: Ball Toss

This is a simple but versatile activity that’s perfect for reported speech. I write down a number of questions on the beach ball. Then, students take turns tossing the ball to each other and the person that catches it has to answer the question under their right thumb.

To add a reported speech element, have another student (the one who threw the ball?) report on that student’s answer. It’s simple but effective! Check it out:

Ball Toss Activity .

#3: Is that Sentence Correct

If you want to focus on forms, then consider using this simple error correction activity. Write some sentences that use the target grammar. Some have errors while others do not. Students have to find the incorrect ones and make the required changes.

It’s possible to do this in class, or for a homework activity. Have a look here:

Is that Sentence Correct? 

#4: Running Dictation

#5: Mixed Up Sentences

Making good sentences using reported speech can be a little bit tricky. If you want to focus on forms, consider using this simple activity.

Write some sentences on the board of PowerPoint, but mix them up in terms of the order. Students have to work quickly to put them in the correct order and the first time to finish is the winner. It also makes a nice homework assignment. Try it out for yourself:

Mixed Up Sentences .

39 No-Prep/Low-Prep ESL Grammar Activities and Games For Kids: Practical Classroom Ideas for English...

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#6: Man/Woman on the Street Interview Activity

If you want to level up the typical ESL interview activity, consider using Man or Woman on the Street. Then, to make it into a reported speech activity, have students tell someone else about what they heard. It’s fun, engaging, and lends itself well to this grammar point. Find out more:

Man/Woman on the Street Activity .

#7: Concentration

This is a fun memory game that’s ideal for a whole bunch of different grammar or vocabulary points. On one card, write down a statement, and then on the other, write down the correct form.

  • I have a boyfriend (She told me that she has a boyfriend).

Make a number of these sets. I usually do 8 of them per group of 4. Then, students play a matching memory game. Learn more here:

Concentration Game .

#8: Vocabulary Auction

#9: Find Someone Who Bingo Game

This is a nice icebreaker activity that can also be used for some practice with this grammar point. Students have to circulate around the class, asking their classmates questions to find people to fill their Bingo grid.

To make this into a reported speech activity, have students report some of the things they learned about their classmates to a partner (bigger classes) or to the entire class (smaller classes). Find out more about it:

Find Someone Who Bingo Game .

#10: More Ideas for Teaching English

#11: dictogloss and reported speech.

This is a challenging ESL activity that’s perfect for developing listening skills. It also lends itself to almost any vocabulary set or grammatical point, including this one.

Find (or write) a passage of people talking about something that they heard.. Then, put students into pairs and read it out at a faster than normal pace. Students take notes and then attempt to recreate what they heard. Repeat the process again. Finally, they can compare what they have with the original. Check it out:

Dictogloss Activity .

#12: Surveys and Reported Speech

I love to use surveys and questionnaires in my classes. They’re engaging, student-centred and cover a range of skills in a single activity. They’re also great for working on this concept if you get each student to tell their partner some of the things they learned about their classmates.

This is a simple way to cover a new concept but have a quick review of this grammar point as well. Take a look at this activity:

ESL Surveys .

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ESL games and activities

#13: Brochure Scanning Activity

This is a nice activity if you have a bunch of different travel brochures. Have students quickly scan them to find important information. For example:

  • number of days

Then, have students use reported speech to tell their partner about the trip. Find out more:

Brochure Scanning Activity .

#14: ESL Review Games and Activities

#15: Daily Routine Activities and Reported Speech

In terms of topics to combine with this concept, daily routine is one of the best. It’s very simple to set up activities that lead to sentences like the following:

  • Tim told me that he gets up at 7 am.
  • Jenny said that she usually sleeps in on the weekends.

For some more ideas, have a look here:

Daily Routine ESL Activities .

#16: Error Correction Relay Race

This is a simple activity that takes something old (error correction) and makes it new again. Students have to work in teams to fix errors in a number of reported speech sentences. The first team to make all the corrections is the winner!

Want to give it a try? Learn more:

Error Correction Relay Race .

#17: Dialogue Substitution

#18: News Reporting

Provide students with news headlines or short news articles. Ask them to transform from direct speech (quoted speech) to reported speech (indirect speech) when retelling the news. This activity helps students practice the appropriate changes in verb tenses, pronouns, and time and place references.

#19: Interview and Report

Pair students up and ask them to conduct mock interviews. Afterward, have them report the interview to a different partner using reported speech. This activity allows students to practice converting direct speech into reported while maintaining the meaning and context of the conversation.

#20: Picture Stories

Provide students with a series of pictures that depict a sequence of events. Ask them to create a story using reported speech to describe what is happening in each picture. This activity encourages students to use this language in a narrative context and practice converting direct speech into reported speech.

#21: Role Plays

Create role play scenarios where students take on different roles and engage in conversations. Afterward, ask them to report the conversations to another person using reported speech. This activity allows students to practice converting direct speech into reported speech in a context that mimics real-life situations.

#22: Song Lyrics Transformation

Choose a song that contains direct speech and ask students to rewrite the lyrics using reported speech. This activity helps students practice converting direct speech in songs into reported speech while exploring the meaning and context of the lyrics.

Online Practice for Reported Speech

There are a number of sites for online practice and quizzes that cover this. They are excellent resources to recommend to students who want a little bit of extra practice. Check it out here:

Perfect English Grammar

Exam English

My English Pages

Reported Speech ESL Lesson Plans

There are lots of nice lesson plans. Here are some of the best ones to consider using:

Lingua House

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Reported Speech Worksheets

If you’re a busy teacher then you’re going to know what a huge time saver it can be to use worksheets that other teachers have made. Here are some of the top picks:

ISL Collective

English Grammar

There are a number of common questions that people have about using this method of speech. Here are the answers to some of the most popular ones.

What is reported speech ESL?

Reported speech ESL is when we tell someone what another person said. You often have to use a tense that is further back in time (backshift) and may also need to change the pronouns.

What are some examples of reported speech?

Some examples of reported speech are the following:

  • They said you didn’t want to come.
  • My mom told me that she was angry at my dad.
  • I asked her what her plans were.

How do you teach reported speech?

To teach reported speech, first set the context with a short video clip, discussion question, etc. Then, explain the grammar rules for it and do some controlled practice. Finally, use an ESL game or activity that allows students to practice further.

What are the types of reported speech?

The types of reported speech are direct speech and indirect speech.

Tips for Teaching Reported Speech To English Learners

Teaching reported speech to ESL learners can be challenging, as it involves a shift in verb tense and pronoun usage. Here are some tips to make the teaching process more effective and engaging.

Start with Direct Speech

Begin by introducing and reviewing direct speech, which is the original statement or question spoken by someone. Ensure students are familiar with the use of quotation marks and the appropriate verb tenses in direct speech.

Introduce Reporting Verbs

Teach students a variety of reporting verbs such as say, tell, ask, explain, suggest, etc. Explain the different patterns that follow these reporting verbs, including the use of direct objects, indirect objects, and prepositions.

Present Tense Changes

Demonstrate how to change verb tenses when reporting speech. Provide clear examples of how present simple changes to past simple, present continuous changes to past continuous, and so on. Reinforce the importance of maintaining accuracy in verb tense changes.

Practice Conversion of Pronouns

Show students how pronouns change when reporting speech. Explain the transformation from the speaker’s pronouns (I, you, we) to the appropriate pronouns in reported speech (he, she, they). Emphasize the use of possessive pronouns when necessary.

Provide Contextualized Examples

Use authentic materials, such as dialogues, interviews, or news articles, to provide meaningful examples of reported speech. This helps students understand the purpose and practical application in real-life situations.

Use Reporting Structures

Teach students reporting structures, such as reporting statements, reporting questions, and reporting commands. Practice transforming direct speech into reported speech using these structures and provide opportunities for students to generate their own examples.

Focus on Reporting Verbs of Perception

Highlight reporting verbs of perception like see, hear, feel, notice, etc., which require a change in verb tense but do not require reporting the exact words. Provide examples to help students understand the difference between reporting statements and reporting verbs of perception.

Incorporate Speaking and Writing Activities

Encourage students to practice reported speech through role-plays, interviews, or storytelling activities. Assign writing tasks where students report a conversation or summarize an article using reported speech.

Address Common Errors

Be aware of common errors students make when learning reported speech, such as incorrect verb tense changes or pronoun usage. Provide corrective feedback and offer opportunities for targeted practice to overcome these challenges.

Review and Reinforce

Regularly review with students and provide opportunities for reinforcement through quizzes, games, or interactive exercises. Repetition and reinforcement are key to solidifying understanding and application of this language.

Did you like these Reported Speech Activities?

39 No-Prep/Low-Prep ESL Grammar Activities and Games: For English Teachers of Teenagers and Adults...

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You can find the book in both digital and print formats. Keep a copy on the bookshelf in your office to use as a handy reference guide. Or, take the e-version with you to your favourite coffee shop for some lesson planning on the go.

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Have your Say about Reported Speech Games and Activities

What do you think about these activities? Are they a winner, or do you have another one that you’d like to recommend? Leave a comment below and let us know what you think. We’d love to hear from you.

Also, be sure to give this article a share on Facebook, Pinterest, or Twitter. It’ll help other busy English teachers, like yourself find this useful resource.

Last update on 2022-07-17 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

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About Jackie

Jackie Bolen has been teaching English for more than 15 years to students in South Korea and Canada. She's taught all ages, levels and kinds of TEFL classes. She holds an MA degree, along with the Celta and Delta English teaching certifications.

Jackie is the author of more than 60 books for English teachers and English learners, including Business English Vocabulary Builder and 39 No-Prep/Low-Prep ESL Speaking Activities for Teenagers and Adults . She loves to share her ESL games, activities, teaching tips, and more with other teachers throughout the world.

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English Grammar Online Exercises and Downloadable Worksheets

Online exercises.

  • Reported Speech

Levels of Difficulty : Elementary Intermediate Advanced

  • RS012 - Reported Speech Intermediate
  • RS011 - Reported Speech Intermediate
  • RS010 - Reporting Verbs Advanced
  • RS009 - Reporting Verbs Advanced
  • RS008 - Reporting Verbs Advanced
  • RS007 - Reporting Verbs Intermediate
  • RS006 - Reported Speech Intermediate
  • RS005 - Reported Speech - Introductory Verbs Advanced
  • RS004 - Reported Speech Intermediate
  • RS003 - Reporting Verbs Intermediate
  • RS002 - Reported Speech Intermediate
  • RS001 - Reported Speech Intermediate
  • Gerund - Infinitive
  • Adjective - Adverb
  • Modal Verbs
  • Passive Voice
  • Definite and Indefinite Articles
  • Prepositions
  • Connectives and Linking Words
  • Quantifiers
  • Question and Negations
  • Relative Pronouns
  • Indefinite Pronouns
  • Possessive Pronouns
  • Phrasal Verbs
  • Common Mistakes
  • Missing Word Cloze
  • Word Formation
  • Multiple Choice Cloze
  • Prefixes and Suffixes
  • Key Word Transformation
  • Editing - One Word Too Many
  • Collocations
  • General Vocabulary
  • Adjectives - Adverbs
  • Gerund and Infinitive
  • Conjunctions and Linking Words
  • Question and Negation
  • Error Analysis
  • Translation Sentences
  • Multiple Choice
  • Banked Gap Fill
  • Open Gap Fill
  • General Vocabulary Exercises
  • Argumentative Essays
  • Letters and Emails
  • English News Articles
  • Privacy Policy

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Reported Speech Activities

Crazy questions.

This is just a quick exercise to check understanding of reported speech questions.

Put some examples on the board:

Do you eat bananas in the shower?

Do you drive with your eyes closed?

Do you wear socks on your head?

Are you married to a ghost?

Have you ever eaten a lion?

Ask students to try and come up with a few more examples.

Then, going around the class each student, in turn, asks the person on their left a crazy question.

Now ask the person who was asked What did he/she ask you?

He asked me if I ate bananas in the shower.

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Reported Speech – Free Exercise

Write the following sentences in indirect speech. Pay attention to backshift and the changes to pronouns, time, and place.

  • Two weeks ago, he said, “I visited this museum last week.” → Two weeks ago, he said that   . I → he|simple past → past perfect|this → that|last …→ the … before
  • She claimed, “I am the best for this job.” → She claimed that   . I → she|simple present→ simple past|this→ that
  • Last year, the minister said, “The crisis will be overcome next year.” → Last year, the minister said that   . will → would|next …→ the following …
  • My riding teacher said, “Nobody has ever fallen off a horse here.” → My riding teacher said that   . present perfect → past perfect|here→ there
  • Last month, the boss explained, “None of my co-workers has to work overtime now.” → Last month, the boss explained that   . my → his/her|simple present→ simple past|now→ then

Rewrite the question sentences in indirect speech.

  • She asked, “What did he say?” → She asked   . The subject comes directly after the question word.|simple past → past perfect
  • He asked her, “Do you want to dance?” → He asked her   . The subject comes directly after whether/if |you → she|simple present → simple past
  • I asked him, “How old are you?” → I asked him   . The subject comes directly after the question word + the corresponding adjective (how old)|you→ he|simple present → simple past
  • The tourists asked me, “Can you show us the way?” → The tourists asked me   . The subject comes directly after whether/if |you→ I|us→ them
  • The shop assistant asked the woman, “Which jacket have you already tried on?” → The shop assistant asked the woman   . The subject comes directly after the question word|you→ she|present perfect → past perfect

Rewrite the demands/requests in indirect speech.

  • The passenger requested the taxi driver, “Stop the car.” → The passenger requested the taxi driver   . to + same wording as in direct speech
  • The mother told her son, “Don’t be so loud.” → The mother told her son   . not to + same wording as in direct speech, but remove don’t
  • The policeman told us, “Please keep moving.” → The policeman told us   . to + same wording as in direct speech ( please can be left off)
  • She told me, “Don’t worry.” → She told me   . not to + same wording as in direct speech, but remove don’t
  • The zookeeper told the children, “Don’t feed the animals.” → The zookeeper told the children   . not to + same wording as in direct speech, but remove don’t

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ESL Speaking

Games + Activities to Try Out Today!

in Activities for Adults · Activities for Kids

Tell your Story | ESL Speaking Activity to Practice Reported Speech

If you’re looking for a reported speech speaking activity, look no further than tell your story . It’s a fun reported speech activity to try out with your higher-level ESL or EFL students. Keep on reading for all the details you need to know about teaching indirect speech!

reported-speech-esl-speaking-activity

Speaking Activity to Practice Reported Speech

You can often find a unit on reported speech in most intermediate-level English textbooks. But, it’s not that easy to design some ESL activities to practice this. Not to worry. Keep on reading for one of the best reported speech activities to try out with your students.

Check out one of my favourites: “Tell a Story.” It’s fun, and engaging, and creates some great opportunities for students to practice this important skill. Reported speech activities don’t have to be terrible any longer! Have some fun with reported speech ESL.

Reported Speech ESL Speaking Activity

Skills: Writing/reading/speaking/listening Time: 15-30 minutes Level: Intermediate to Advanced Materials Required: Nothing

Have students write something interesting. Some examples are the most embarrassing moment, the scariest thing you’ve ever done, your dream for the future, future predictions , etc. Base it on whatever topic you are studying in class that day. Make it clear to the students that it should be something they’re willing to share with the entire class so as not to write something very private.

Then, distribute the stories to other people in the class. Then the students have to go around the class, finding the person whose story they have by asking questions. Once they find that person, they have to ask them three interesting questions about the story. And the person who originally wrote the story has to answer them of course.

I like this part of it because it gets students up and out of their seats, moving around and talking to different people. It gets boring sitting down all the time and talking to only 1 person! It’s ideal for those sleepy classes that you might have on Friday afternoon or those ones who are just waking up on Monday morning.

reported-speech-activities

Reported speech ESL activities

Teaching Tips for Tell Your Story:

Emphasize to students that they are to practice asking good questions. For example, “USA?” is not a good question, while, “Did you study abroad in the USA?” is much better. Full sentences are the key here.

Also, emphasize that students should think of interesting follow-up questions that expand upon their knowledge about that situation. This involves reading carefully so they can avoid asking about things that are already mentioned.

You can give your students a couple of minutes before the activity starts to write down a few questions based on the paper they received to help facilitate this. Based on the topic you’ve assigned for the story, there should be some obvious ones that they’d want to ask.

This activity provides an excellent opportunity for your students to work on reported speech. This is something that high-level students are often surprisingly weak at. If you have a small class (less than 10), students can report what they learned about their partner to everyone.

If larger, students can tell their seating partner what they learned. For example, students might say something like, “I talked to Min-Ji. She told me that she got in a car accident last year. She said that it was really scary, but thankfully nobody got injured seriously.”

Procedure for this Reported Speech Activity:

  • Have students write an interesting story based on a certain topic. Adjust for length and difficulty depending on your students.
  • Collect stories and redistribute them–one per student, making sure a student does not get their own story.
  • Students go around the class asking people if that is their story. For example, “Did you get in a car accident when you were little?”
  • When they find the person, they must ask them three interesting follow-up questions about it.
  • Do the optional variation of having students tell other people what they learned about their classmate in order to practice using reported speech.
  • Follow-up with a worksheet, other activity or homework assignment.

Do You Like this Reported Speech ESL Speaking Activity?

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If you like this ESL speaking activity to help your students practice reported speech, then you’re going to love this book: 101 ESL Activities: For Teenagers and Adults . It’s lesson planning made easy, guaranteed. The key to better English classes is a wide variety of engaging and interactive games and activities and this book will help you get there in style.

There are dozens of top-quality ESL games and activities for teenagers and adults that are organized into various categories: reading, writing, speaking, writing, warm-ups, and 4-skills. You’re sure to find something that will work for any level of students or topic.

You can get the book on Amazon in both print and digital formats. The (cheaper!) digital copy can be read on any device by downloading the free Kindle reading app. It’s super easy to have fun, engaging ESL activities with you anywhere you go.

Or, buy the book and keep it as a handy reference on your bookshelf, or teacher supply room. You can check out 101 ESL Activities for yourself over on Amazon:

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Teaching Reported Speech FAQs

There are a number of common questions that people have about reported speech games and activities for English learners. Here are the answers to some of the most popular ones.

What is reported speech in English?

Reported speech is when we talk about or repeat what someone else has said using our own words.

Why do we use reported speech?

We use reported speech to share information, statements, or questions that someone else has said.

What changes occur when turning direct speech into indirect speech?

Pronouns, tense, and time expressions often change for indirect speech.

Can you give an example of direct speech changing to reported speech?

Direct: She said, “I am going to the store.” Reported: She said that she was going to the store.

What happens to the pronouns in reported speech?

Pronouns usually change to match the perspective of the speaker in reported speech.

How do you shift tenses in reported speech?

Generally, you shift the tense back one step. For example, present simple becomes past simple.

Do all time expressions remain the same in indirect speech?

No, time expressions usually change, e.g., “now” becomes “then,” “today” becomes “that day.”

What’s the reporting verb?

The verb that introduces indirect speech can be things like, “said,” “told,” “asked.”

Can questions be reported too?

Yes, questions can be reported using reporting verbs like “asked” or “wondered.”

How do you report imperative sentences?

Imperative sentences are reported using the verb “to” + infinitive, or with phrases like “ordered” or “told.”

What’s the key to successfully teaching indirect speech to ESL students?

Practice and exposure through various exercises and real-life examples are crucial for understanding indirect speech.

reported speech games

Reported speech games and activities for ESL

Tell your Story English Speaking Activity: Have your Say!

What do you think of this activity to practice ESL reported speech? Is it a good one or do you have another reported speech lesson plan activity that you’d like to recommend? Leave a comment below and let us know your thoughts. We’d love to hear from you.

Also be sure to give this article a share on Facebook, Pinterest, or Twitter. It’ll help other busy teachers, like yourself find this useful resource.

Last update on 2024-04-25 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

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About Jackie

Jackie Bolen has been teaching English for more than 15 years to students in South Korea and Canada. She's taught all ages, levels and kinds of TEFL classes. She holds an MA degree, along with the Celta and Delta English teaching certifications.

Jackie is the author of more than 100 books for English teachers and English learners, including 101 ESL Activities for Teenagers and Adults and 1001 English Expressions and Phrases . She loves to share her ESL games, activities, teaching tips, and more with other teachers throughout the world.

You can find her on social media at: YouTube Facebook TikTok Pinterest Instagram

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Exercise on Reported Speech

Mixed exercise 1.

Complete the sentences in reported speech. Note whether the sentence is a request, a statement or a question.

  • He said, "I like this song." → He said
  • "Where is your sister?" she asked me. → She asked me
  • "I don't speak Italian," she said. → She said
  • "Say hello to Jim," they said. → They asked me
  • "The film began at seven o'clock," he said. → He said
  • "Don't play on the grass, boys," she said. → She told the boys
  • "Where have you spent your money?" she asked him. → She asked him
  • "I never make mistakes," he said. → He said
  • "Does she know Robert?" he wanted to know. → He wanted to know
  • "Don't try this at home," the stuntman told the audience. → The stuntman advised the audience

Reported speech exercises

Mixed exercises to practise reported, or indirect speech.

Intermediate level

Multiple choice

Reported statements, questions, imperative mood

Filling gaps

Backshift of tenses in reported speech

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Reported speech is a specific issue in English grammar. There are special rules on how to transfer statements, questions and demands from direct to indirect speech. These exercises are composed for revision and systematization of your knowledge on reported speech. We recommend to do them after you have studied all smaller topics related to reported speech. The links to the explanations and exercises are below.

Related topics

He said he'd come — Reported statements

I asked her where she lived — Reported questions

I told him to stop — Reported requests & orders

Past simple

I was doing — Past continuous

I had done — How to form past perfect

I had been doing — How to form past perfect continuous

Top 10 topics

Irregular verbs

Conditionals (If I knew, I'd tell you)

Get on, turn up... — Phrasal verbs

Modal verbs (can, must, should etc.)

Present perfect vs. Past simple

Present simple and continuous for the future, to be going to

Passive voice (I was told)

At 2 o'clock on Sunday — Prepositions of time

reported speech exercises games online

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Reported speech - 1

Reported speech - 2

Reported speech - 3

Worksheets - handouts

Exercises: indirect speech

  • Reported speech - present
  • Reported speech - past
  • Reported speech - questions
  • Reported questions - write
  • Reported speech - imperatives
  • Reported speech - modals
  • Indirect speech - tenses 1
  • Indirect speech - tenses 2
  • Indirect speech - write 1
  • Indirect speech - write 2
  • Indirect speech - quiz
  • Reported speech - tenses
  • Indirect speech – reported speech
  • Reported speech – indirect speech

Reported Speech Exercise 1

Perfect english grammar.

reported speech exercises games online

Here's an exercise about reported statements.

  • Review reported statements here
  • Download this quiz in PDF here
  • More reported speech exercises here

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Yet Another 15 Games for Reported Speech

1. Reporting the whole course Students report something someone in the class (including the teacher) said, and the other students try to guess or remember who said it. This is nice near the end of a course or as part of a revision lesson.

2. Tell on his errors Students watch a segment of a video where a character makes stupid verbal blunders, e.g. the Rowan Atkinson priest character in “Four Weddings and a Funeral” and listen for things they shouldn’t have said. When you stop the video they get one point for each mistake they report but lose one point if the thing they report was actually what the person meant to say/ should have said.

3. We’ve heard that story before Students write a story and add one of the events (e.g. the vase getting broken) a second time where it shouldn’t be. When they change groups their new partner has to listen carefully to the story and report anything they hear repeated with phrases like “But you said you had already shot him dead before the police arrived”. With less creative classes or to save time, this activity can also be done with them being given the stories but adding the repeated parts themselves.

4. It’s my story, I’ll mix it up if I want to Students work together to put a worksheet of pictures or words in some order to make a story, but without writing anything down to remind them what the story was and the order they put the pictures or words in. They then split up to tell their story separately to another pair of students. The two pairs of students then get together, and the people who were told the story try to find differences between the two versions, and report them to the storytellers.

5. Report him for that topic Students report speech they heard in their lives, heard in a previous jigsaw listening or video stage, or have been given quotes from on a worksheet, and their partners guess what subject was being talked about.

6. Report that man! Students report something that was said, e.g. quotes by famous people they all know or that they have been given, and they guess who said it (maybe from a list of possible people).

7. Report them and rank them Students are given different lists of quotes and have to agree on a ranking of all of them in terms of how true they are, how funny they are, how inspirational they are etc.

8. Guess what they said about it Report the topic and the person speaking and students guess if what was said was positive or negative, and be more specific about the opinions if they can. This works both for things famous people said and things they really heard in their own lives.

9. Report, analyse and report One student reports another student’s answers to a questionnaire, and the third student analyses their personality, most suitable blind date, most suitable job etc- either from an analysis they have been given or from their own imagination. The second person can then report the third person’s judgements back to the first person to see whether they think the conclusions are true or not.

10. Accumulating mingle As students walk around class doing a mingle activity such as “Find Someone Who”, they have to not only find out about the person they are speaking to but also everything their partner has found out so far. This continues until they know one thing about each person in the class or have answered all the questions on their worksheet, at which point they can sit down.

11. Reporting stereotypes Students guess which nationality is talking about which nationality, with sentences from the teacher’s experience, from questionnaires that have been used in several countries (these come up in the news sometimes), or from the other students’ imaginations about what the British think about Americans etc.

12. Guess the it Students report a sentence with a reference word like “it”, “that”, “him” or “one” in it, then the other students guess what it refers to. This can be done with jigsaw videos and listenings, as explained in the previous article on reported speech games.

13. Tell me more tell me more Students report something that someone said but leave out some crucial information at the end, e.g. “Brad Pitt said that Jennifer Aniston was terrible at…”, and the other students try to guess the missing words, being given hints if needed.

14. Match that grammar Write some sentences in both reported and direct speech and split them down the middle. Put the first halves of the reported speech versions on the Student A worksheet and the end halves of the direct speech sentences on the Student B worksheet, but mixed up. Students try to work out which sentences match and to write the complete sentences in both direct and reported speech on their worksheet (obviously not showing their worksheet to their partner until the end of the activity).

15. Guess the gossip Students make gossip sentences with “Yesterday I heard that…” etc, maybe from cue cards like “Michael Jackson” or “two-timing, then the other students guess if they really heard that from elsewhere or just made it up on the spot. This can be used for love vocab, business vocab, crime vocab, education, politics etc.

You may also like:

  • More Reported Speech Games
  • Fun Ways of Practising Reported Speech
  • Parts of Speech

The articles and worksheets are now here: https://www.tefl.net/elt/ideas/games/reported-speech/ https://www.tefl.net/elt/ideas/games/reported-speech-games/ https://tefltastic.wordpress.com/worksheets/grammar/reported-speech/

Thank you for your ideas.

Thanks Ma Li. Some worksheets with these and other ideas here: http://www.tefl.net/alexcase/worksheets/grammar/reported-speech/

Alex…these are some of the better reported speech games I have seen in a long time. They reinforce cooperation and collaboration, cued and spontaneous listening, speaking with a purpose, humor in the classroom, and much more. Many thanks.

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Reported speech

Examples from our community, 3,359 results for 'reported speech'.

Reported Speech

  • Reported Speech — Present Simple — Exercise 1
  • 1. Noah, “I go to the gym three times per week.” Noah said (that) . he went to the gym three times per week
  • 2. Henry, “Emma doesn’t learn English.” Henry said (that) . Emma didn’t learn English
  • 3. Charlotte, “My house is at the end of the street.” Charlotte said (that) . her house was at the end of the street
  • 4. Amelia, “Chris looks tired.” Amelia said (that) . Chris looked tired
  • 5. Ethan, “I am happy to meet you.” Ethan said (that) . he was happy to meet me
  • 6. Daisy, “We enjoy our Spanish classes.” Daisy said (that) . they enjoyed their Spanish classes
  • 7. Amy, “The day is amazing.” Amy said (that) . the day was amazing
  • 8. Ryan, “I don’t want to answer your questions.” Ryan said (that) . he didn’t want to answer my questions
  • 9. Charles, “They don’t work hard enough.” Charles said (that) . they didn’t work hard enough
  • 10. Ella, “Peter usually reads science-fiction books.” Ella said (that) . Peter usually read science-fiction books
  • 11. Claire, “I have a new job.” Claire said (that) . she had a new job
  • 12. Adam, “Your car is dirty.” Adam said (that) . my car was dirty
  • Reported Speech — Present Simple — Exercise 2
  • Reported statements — mixed tenses — Exercise 1
  • Reported statements — mixed tenses — Exercise 2
  • Reported statements — mixed tenses — Exercise 3
  • Reported statements — mixed tenses — Exercise 4

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  • B1-B2 grammar

Reported speech

Daisy has just had an interview for a summer job. 

Instructions

As you watch the video, look at the examples of reported speech. They are in  red  in the subtitles. Then read the conversation below to learn more. Finally, do the grammar exercises to check you understand, and can use, reported speech correctly.

Sophie:  Mmm, it’s so nice to be chilling out at home after all that running around.

Ollie: Oh, yeah, travelling to glamorous places for a living must be such a drag!

Ollie: Mum, you can be so childish sometimes. Hey, I wonder how Daisy’s getting on in her job interview.

Sophie: Oh, yes, she said she was having it at four o’clock, so it’ll have finished by now. That’ll be her ... yes. Hi, love. How did it go?

Daisy: Well, good I think, but I don’t really know. They said they’d phone later and let me know.

Sophie: What kind of thing did they ask you?

Daisy: They asked if I had any experience with people, so I told them about helping at the school fair and visiting old people at the home, that sort of stuff. But I think they meant work experience.

Sophie: I’m sure what you said was impressive. They can’t expect you to have had much work experience at your age.

Daisy:  And then they asked me what acting I had done, so I told them that I’d had a main part in the school play, and I showed them a bit of the video, so that was cool.

Sophie:  Great!

Daisy: Oh, and they also asked if I spoke any foreign languages.

Sophie: Languages?

Daisy: Yeah, because I might have to talk to tourists, you know.

Sophie: Oh, right, of course.

Daisy: So that was it really. They showed me the costume I’ll be wearing if I get the job. Sending it over ...

Ollie: Hey, sis, I heard that Brad Pitt started out as a giant chicken too! This could be your big break!

Daisy: Ha, ha, very funny.

Sophie: Take no notice, darling. I’m sure you’ll be a marvellous chicken.

We use reported speech when we want to tell someone what someone said. We usually use a reporting verb (e.g. say, tell, ask, etc.) and then change the tense of what was actually said in direct speech.

So, direct speech is what someone actually says? Like 'I want to know about reported speech'?

Yes, and you report it with a reporting verb.

He said he wanted to know about reported speech.

I said, I want and you changed it to he wanted .

Exactly. Verbs in the present simple change to the past simple; the present continuous changes to the past continuous; the present perfect changes to the past perfect; can changes to could ; will changes to would ; etc.

She said she was having the interview at four o’clock. (Direct speech: ' I’m having the interview at four o’clock.') They said they’d phone later and let me know. (Direct speech: ' We’ll phone later and let you know.')

OK, in that last example, you changed you to me too.

Yes, apart from changing the tense of the verb, you also have to think about changing other things, like pronouns and adverbs of time and place.

'We went yesterday.'  > She said they had been the day before. 'I’ll come tomorrow.' >  He said he’d come the next day.

I see, but what if you’re reporting something on the same day, like 'We went yesterday'?

Well, then you would leave the time reference as 'yesterday'. You have to use your common sense. For example, if someone is saying something which is true now or always, you wouldn’t change the tense.

'Dogs can’t eat chocolate.' > She said that dogs can’t eat chocolate. 'My hair grows really slowly.' >  He told me that his hair grows really slowly.

What about reporting questions?

We often use ask + if/whether , then change the tenses as with statements. In reported questions we don’t use question forms after the reporting verb.

'Do you have any experience working with people?' They asked if I had any experience working with people. 'What acting have you done?' They asked me what acting I had done .

Is there anything else I need to know about reported speech?

One thing that sometimes causes problems is imperative sentences.

You mean like 'Sit down, please' or 'Don’t go!'?

Exactly. Sentences that start with a verb in direct speech need a to + infinitive in reported speech.

She told him to be good. (Direct speech: 'Be good!') He told them not to forget. (Direct speech: 'Please don’t forget.')

OK. Can I also say 'He asked me to sit down'?

Yes. You could say 'He told me to …' or 'He asked me to …' depending on how it was said.

OK, I see. Are there any more reporting verbs?

Yes, there are lots of other reporting verbs like promise , remind , warn , advise , recommend , encourage which you can choose, depending on the situation. But say , tell and ask are the most common.

Great. I understand! My teacher said reported speech was difficult.

And I told you not to worry!

Check your grammar: matching

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What was the most memorable conversation you had yesterday? Who were you talking to and what did they say to you?

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Direct & Indirect Speech

  • Game Code: 134332
  •  English     31      Public Convert the direct speech statements into indirect speech.
  •   Play   Study   Slideshow   Share  Esther Samuel  2,248

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  • He said, "I will pay tomorrow." He said that he would pay the next day.
  • Bill said, "I may lend you some money." Bill said that he might lend me some money.
  • "What do you want?" she asked him. She asked him what he wanted.
  • "Are you coming with us?" he asked me. He asked me if I was coming / going with him.
  • He asked, "When do you intend to make the payment?" He enquired when I intended to make the payment.
  • "Do you come from France?" asked the Prince to the girl. The Prince asked the girl if she came from France.
  • "Which way should I go?" asked the little girl. The little girl asked which way she should go.
  • Aladdin said to the magician, "What have I done to deserve so severe a punishment?" Aladdin asked the magician what he had done to deserve so severe a punishment.
  • "Don’t you know the way home?" I said to her. I asked her whether she did not know the way home.
  • "Can you solve this problem?" he asked me. He asked me if I could solve that problem.
  • Jack thought, "I wonder why Walter always wears a cap." Jack wondered why Walter always wore a cap.
  • Wilma said, "Deb isn't fun to be with." Wilma said that Deb wasn't fun to be with.
  • "Where is my wallet?" wondered Mrs. Taylor. Mrs. Taylor wondered where her wallet was.
  • Paul said to Walter, "Are you glad to be in England?" Paul asked Walter if he was glad to be in England.
  • She says, "I'm a little bit nervous." She said that she was a little bit nervous.

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Ukraine-Russia war latest: Russia could be ready to attack NATO in three years, Norway warns

NATO only has two to three years to prepare before Russia regains its ability to launch a conventional attack on the alliance, Norway's top general has said.

Tuesday 4 June 2024 13:45, UK

Vladimir Putin at the Beijing Capital International Airport. Pic: Yue Yuewei/Xinhua via AP

  • The big picture: Everything you need to know about the war right now
  • Russia could be ready to attack NATO in three years, Norway warns
  • Baby among seven civilians injured in overnight missile strike
  • Moscow warns US against 'mistakes that may have fatal consequences'
  • Enemy 'suffers 1,270 casualties in 24 hours', Ukraine claims
  • China hits back at Zelenskyy over summit disruption allegations
  • Live reporting by Guy Birchall

By  Ivor Bennett , Moscow correspondent

Dozens of Alexei Navalny supporters have visited his grave to lay flowers and pay tribute to the late Kremlin critic on what would have been his 48th birthday. 

The opposition leader died at an Arctic prison colony in February, prompting outrage from Western governments.

Nearly four months on, his family say the cause of his death remains unexplained.

His widow Yulia Navalnaya has accused Vladimir Putin of ordering his murder, and last week his allies called for additional sanctions to punish the Russian president’s inner circle.

The Kremlin has repeatedly denied any involvement in his death. According to his death certificate, he died of natural causes.

Navalny’s mother, Lyudmila, as well as his mother-in-law Alla Abrosimova, were among those who gathered at his grave in the Borisovskoye cemetery in south-east Moscow on Tuesday.

Video posted by SOTAvision on the social media platform Telegram shows a memorial service led by Dmitry Safronov, a priest who was previously banned from clerical duties by the Russian Orthodox Church for presiding over a similar service in March, which marked 40 days since the activist’s death.

According to the independent Novaya Gazeta newspaper, three police officers were on duty near the cemetery but they did not make any arrests.

Having been convicted of multiple charges, ranging from fraud to extremism, Navalny was serving sentences totalling more than 30 years when he died.

His Anti-Corruption Foundation (FBK) is outlawed in Russia, and has been accused by the authorities of having links to the CIA.

What remains of his team now operates in exile.

Polish farmers have resumed their protest blockade at the Ukrainian border crossing due to agricultural imports from the country.

Farmers in Poland have staged sporadic demonstrations at the border since last autumn.

The demonstrators are blocking trucks from leaving Ukraine.

Cargo vehicles heading to Ukraine are allowed to enter by 12 trucks per 12 hours and by four trucks with humanitarian aid per hour, the Ukrainian Border Guard Service said.

Other vehicles are continuing as usual.

"Representatives of Polish farmers demand reduced imports of Ukrainian crops to Polish territory from Ukraine," the Border Guard Service said.

Disputes over crop imports have strained the relationship between Warsaw and Kyiv, with both countries being major agricultural producers.

Polish farmers have complained that Ukrainian products create uneven competition, particularly since the EU lifted tariffs in 2022.

Poland banned the import of several products from Ukraine, including grain, corn, and rapeseed, in 2023.

In our last post, we brought you news that Microsoft had made allegations in the New York Times that Russia was targetting the upcoming Olympics with a disinformation campaign.

Moscow has now branded those accusations "absolute slander", with Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov saying there is no substance to them.

Russia is widely accused of having waged disinformation campaigns over the years, often targeting elections in the United States, Europe and Britain.

Moscow has always denied it uses disinformation to influence public opinion. 

The Paris Olympics are being targeted by a Russian-linked disinformation campaign, according to the New York Times.

Since last summer, efforts have been under way by a hacker group named Storm-1679, the paper reports.

The campaign "began in earnest" when a documentary was released with a doctored International Olympic Committee (IOC) logo, along with an AI-powered impersonation of Tom Cruise's voice.

The hackers "are trying to cultivate an anticipation of violence", said Clint Watts, the head of Microsoft's Digital Threat Analysis Centre.

"They want people to be fearful of going to the Olympics."

Storm-1679 makes around three to eight disinformation videos a week, Mr Watts told the newspaper, many of which appear as if they come from media outlets such as the BBC or Al Jazeera.

Both Russia and Belarus have been banned from competing in the Olympics over the war in Ukraine, but some athletes from those countries will be allowed to compete as "neutral athletes", the IOC announced in March.

The Paris games will take place between 26 July and 11 August.

The Kremlin has said the peace talks set to take place in Switzerland this month are "absurd" as Russia isn't invited.

Moscow claimed it was understandable that some countries were declining to take part in the summit on Ukraine this month because the gathering lacked clear goals.

Ukraine says more than 100 countries and organisations have agreed to take part in the summit on 15-16 June.

The summit, which will take place at an Alpine resort near Lucerne, is intended to create a framework for lasting peace and a roadmap for Russia's eventual participation in the process.

Kyiv decided against inviting Russia because it does not trust Moscow.

China, which has grown closer to Russia after Western sanctions brought in since the invasion of Ukraine, has also said it won't be attending.

Poland has claimed Belarus and its ally Russia are behind a recent surge in migrants from the former Soviet state into the European Union.

The number of attempted illegal border crossings from Belarus into Poland has shot up in recent months from only a handful to almost 400 a day, Polish officials say.

Poland's border guards have also described increasingly aggressive behaviour by some migrants on the Belarusian side of the border, posting online videos of some throwing rocks, logs and even burning wood at Polish troops.

There have been cases of soldiers and guards ending up in hospital, and some have needed stitches after being stabbed or cut by knife-wielding assailants. 

Last Tuesday, near the village of Dubicze Cerkiewne, officials said a migrant reached between the bars of the 16-foot-high barrier and stabbed a soldier in the ribs. 

The government in Warsaw sees the new push at the border as an orchestrated attempt by Russia and Belarus to fuel anti-migrant sentiment, which could in turn boost far-right parties in the EU parliamentary vote. 

"We are not dealing with [just] any asylum seekers here, we are dealing with a coordinated, very efficient - on many levels - operation to break the Polish border and attempts to destabilise the country,"  Donald Tusk, the Polish prime minister, said last week while visiting troops at the border.

Ukraine's use of Western-supplied weapons to strike targets in Russia will not "contribute to escalation", German Chancellor Olaf Scholz has said.

Germany has long opposed lifting the ban on Ukraine's use of Western weapons to target Russia, but changed course last month.

A German government spokesperson told Deutsche Welle on 31 May that Ukraine could use German-supplied weapons to hit legitimate targets in Russia. 

Berlin's defence minister Boris Pistorius later clarified that the decision applied to the area around Kharkiv, which has recently become the target of a heavy Russian offensive.

"We are certain that it will not contribute to an escalation because, as Joe Biden has also described, it is only a matter of being able to defend a large city like Kharkiv," Mr Scholz said.

In the past, Chancellor Scholz has cited a fear of escalation as among the principal reasons for limiting Germany's support for Ukraine.

"I think it is clear to everyone that this must be possible. Under international law, this has always been possible anyway," he added.

General Eirik Kristoffersen's comments are the latest in a series of warnings from Western leaders and defence officials about the threat from Moscow and the alliance's current lack of preparedness.

"At one point someone said it'll take 10 years, but I think we're back to less than 10 years because of the industrial base that is now running in Russia," General Kristoffersen said.

"It will take some time, which gives us a window now for the next two to three years to rebuild our forces, to rebuild our stocks at the same time as we are supporting Ukraine."

Norway has been a member of NATO since its foundation in 1949.

The Scandinavian nation has increased its defence spending since the beginning of the war in Ukraine and aims to meet the 2% of GDP threshold in 2024, with a further increase of 2.7% of GDP targeted by 2030.

Last week, the US partially lifted restrictions on Ukraine's use of some Western-supplied weapons. 

It now means Ukraine can strike inside Russia with US-supplied weapons - but only if the targets are aimed at slowing Moscow's advance in the Kharkiv region. 

Ukrainian foreign minister said the move was "not 100% clearance" and came with "some rules that need to be followed". 

Speaking at a news conference with his Estonian counterpart, he said Ukraine was hoping to gain more freedom on the use of Western weapons inside Russia. 

Ukraine "will continue to work with our allies" on "expanding the scope" of weapon use. 

Some of Kyiv's allies have been reluctant to allow Ukraine to strike over the border as they fear this could drag them into a more direct conflict with Russia. 

Authorities in Kyiv have denied permission for this year's Kyiv Pride march to be held in the Ukrainian capital's metro system. 

It was hoped up to 500 people would attend the event on 16 June. 

"In order not to endanger the participants and passengers, and to avoid possible provocations, the city authorities cannot allow the Equality March to take place in the metro," Kyiv's City Hall said. 

The metro system doubles as an air raid shelter during Russian attacks. 

Authorities said the metro is a "dual-use facility and part of the city's critical infrastructure" and is "always a high-risk area due to limited space, train schedule and high passenger traffic". 

Kyiv has not hosted a Pride event since the full-scale invasion began in 2022. 

Last year's event was held in Liverpool instead. 

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  1. Reported speech exercises/ أ. أيمن سعادة

  2. Reported Speech

  3. Reported speech exercise for beginners ( simple past )

  4. Reported Speech

  5. Direct and indirect speech or reported Speech Part 1 through Kannada

  6. Degree Semester IV New Syllabus Reported Speech Text book Exercises|| Osmania University

COMMENTS

  1. Reported Speech Quiz

    Test your understanding of Reported Speech in English with this Reported Speech Quiz. Reported Speech, also known as indirect speech, is used to convey what someone else said without quoting their exact words. It often involves changes in tense, pronouns, and time expressions to suit the reporting context. For example, direct speech: " I am ...

  2. Reported speech games

    Wordwall makes it quick and easy to create your perfect teaching resource. Pick a template. Enter your content. Get a pack of printable and interactive activities. Find Out More. Reported Speech - Reported Speech - Reported speech - Reported Speech - REPORTED SPEECH - army + games - Wheel of Games - BrawlStars - Find My Singing Monsters.

  3. Reported Speech Games, Activities, Worksheets and Lesson Plans

    This is a fun memory game that's ideal for a whole bunch of different grammar or vocabulary points. On one card, write down a statement, and then on the other, write down the correct form. I have a boyfriend (She told me that she has a boyfriend). Make a number of these sets. I usually do 8 of them per group of 4.

  4. Reported Speech ESL Games Activities Worksheets

    ESL Reporting Modal Verbs Worksheet - Grammar Exercises: Identifying, Matching, Gap-fill, Rewriting Sentences, Writing a Paragraph - Intermediate (B1) - 30 minutes. In this useful reported speech worksheet, students learn the indirect form of four modal verbs and practice using them in reported speech. First, students read a short dialogue and ...

  5. Reported Speech

    RS007 - Reporting Verbs Intermediate. RS006 - Reported Speech Intermediate. RS005 - Reported Speech - Introductory Verbs Advanced. RS004 - Reported Speech Intermediate. RS003 - Reporting Verbs Intermediate. RS002 - Reported Speech Intermediate. RS001 - Reported Speech Intermediate. Reported Speech - English Grammar Exercises.

  6. Reported Speech Quiz

    Online quiz to test your understanding of English reported speech. This is a free multiple-choice quiz that you can do online or print out. ... Grammar: Reported Speech: Quiz Reported Speech Quiz. You can do this grammar quiz online or print it on paper. It tests what you learned on the Reported Speech pages. 1. Which is a reporting verb ...

  7. Reported Speech

    Reported Speech - English Grammar Game for kids. This is an English grammar activity to practice and develop skills in using reported speech for kids. Reported Speech - We use reporting verbs like 'say', 'tell' or 'ask' to report what someone else said as a direct speech. Hence, reported speech is alternatively referred to as ...

  8. Reported Speech Activities

    By adult esl games. Crazy Questions. This is just a quick exercise to check understanding of reported speech questions. Put some examples on the board: ... One thought on " Reported Speech Activities " Nastya says: October 11, 2022 at 2:26 pm. Haha, an amazing activity. Reply.

  9. Reported Speech

    Rewrite the demands/requests in indirect speech. The passenger requested the taxi driver, "Stop the car.". → The passenger requested the taxi driver . to + same wording as in direct speech. The mother told her son, "Don't be so loud.". → The mother told her son . not to + same wording as in direct speech, but remove don't.

  10. Reported Speech Exercises

    Perfect English Grammar. Here's a list of all the reported speech exercises on this site: ( Click here to read the explanations about reported speech ) Reported Statements: Present Simple Reported Statement Exercise (quite easy) (in PDF here) Present Continuous Reported Statement Exercise (quite easy)

  11. Reported Speech

    Reported Speech (Indirect Speech), explanation and exercises. Exercises on Reported Speech. If we report what another person has said, we usually do not use the speaker's exact words (direct speech), but reported (indirect) speech.

  12. Reported Speech ESL Speaking Activity: Tell your Story

    Procedure for this Reported Speech Activity: Have students write an interesting story based on a certain topic. Adjust for length and difficulty depending on your students. Collect stories and redistribute them-one per student, making sure a student does not get their own story.

  13. Reported Speech

    in /by turacogame. Practice and develop skills in using reported speech through this English grammar activity. (50votes, average: 3.66out of 5) Loading... Reported Speech -We use reporting verbs like 'say', 'tell' or 'ask' to report what someone else said as a direct speech. Hence, reported speech is alternatively referred to as ...

  14. Exercise on Reported Speech

    Mixed Exercise 1. Complete the sentences in reported speech. Note whether the sentence is a request, a statement or a question. He said, "I like this song." → He said "Where is your sister?" she asked me. → She asked me "I don't speak Italian," she said. → She said "Say hello to Jim," they said. → They asked me

  15. Reported speech exercises online

    Reported speech is a specific issue in English grammar. There are special rules on how to transfer statements, questions and demands from direct to indirect speech. These exercises are composed for revision and systematization of your knowledge on reported speech. We recommend to do them after you have studied all smaller topics related to ...

  16. Reported speech exercises

    Exercises: indirect speech. Reported speech - present. Reported speech - past. Reported speech - questions. Reported questions - write. Reported speech - imperatives. Reported speech - modals. Indirect speech - tenses 1. Indirect speech - tenses 2.

  17. Reported Speech Exercise 1

    Reported Statements 1. Change the direct speech into reported speech. Use 'she said' at the beginning of each answer. It's the same day, so you don't need to change the time expressions. 1) "He works in a bank." [ . Check. Show.

  18. Reported speech game

    by Tayenesantos. ELA. Final /g/ Open the box. by Powellselah. Speech Production Speech therapy. High frequency /th/ words Spin the wheel. by Holly17. articulation Speech Speech therapy. /f/ minimal pairs (stopping) Image quiz.

  19. Yet Another 15 Games for Reported Speech

    12. Guess the it. Students report a sentence with a reference word like "it", "that", "him" or "one" in it, then the other students guess what it refers to. This can be done with jigsaw videos and listenings, as explained in the previous article on reported speech games. 13. Tell me more tell me more.

  20. Reported speech

    Prevocalic R Spin the wheel. by Holly17. articulation Speech Speech therapy. High frequency /th/ words Spin the wheel. by Holly17. articulation Speech Speech therapy. Final /g/ Open the box. by Powellselah. Speech Production Speech therapy.

  21. Reported Speech

    We are celebrating a milestone of 1000 FREE worksheets and online exercises. you can support our website here Reported Speech — Present Simple — Exercise 1

  22. Reported speech

    Reported speech. Daisy has just had an interview for a summer job. Instructions. 0:00 / 2:20. 720p. Transcript. We use reported speech when we want to tell someone what someone said. We usually use a reporting verb (e.g. say, tell, ask, etc.) and then change the tense of what was actually said in direct speech.

  23. Direct & Indirect Speech

    he asked me. Jack thought, "I wonder why Walter always wears a cap." Wilma said, "Deb isn't fun to be with." "Where is my wallet?" wondered Mrs. Taylor. Paul said to Walter, "Are you glad to be in England?" She says, "I'm a little bit nervous." Convert the direct speech statements into indirect speech.

  24. All Things Considered for June, 1 2024 : NPR

    JOSH GIBSON'S NEW PLACE IN THE RECORD BOOKS. by Scott Detrow. 6 min. Searching for a song you heard between stories? We've retired music buttons on these pages. Learn more here. Hear the All ...

  25. Ukraine-Russia war latest: Russia could be ready to attack NATO in

    The Paris games will take place between 26 July and 11 August. ... posting online videos of some throwing rocks, logs and even burning wood at Polish troops. ... No injuries were reported.