The Battle of Hastings (1066)

You can describe what happened during the Battle of Hastings and how historians have made use of the Bayeux Tapestry.

Lesson details

Key learning points.

  • William of Normandy made thorough preparations for the Battle of Hastings
  • William of Normandy defeated Harold Godwinson at the Battle of Hastings
  • The Bayeux Tapestry is an important source for the study of the Battle of Hastings
  • Historians have to use the Bayeux Tapestry carefully when establishing what happened during the Battle of Hastings

Common misconception

That the Bayeux Tapestry is a 'biased' source and therefore not useful to historians.

Although all sources were produced in a particular context, historians can ask careful questions of them to learn about the past.

Fyrd - The fyrd was the group of local, untrained soldiers called up to fight in Anglo-Saxon England.

Shield wall - The defensive line of shields used by the Anglo-Saxon army was known as the shield wall.

Infantry - Infantry are foot soldiers.

Cavalry - Cavalry are soldiers on horseback.

Siege - The act of surrounding a town and refusing to let people out or goods in is a siege.

Content guidance

  • Contains conflict or violence.

Supervision

Adult supervision suggested.

This content is © Oak National Academy Limited ( 2024 ), licensed on Open Government Licence version 3.0 except where otherwise stated. See Oak's terms & conditions (Collection 2).

Starter quiz

6 questions.

Harold Godwinson -  

Harald Hardrada -  

William the Conqueror -  

Succession crisis -  

A situation in which there is no clear heir to the throne

A person who expects to inherit something

A male ruler of a country who inherits his position by birth

A seat used by a king or queen

local, untrained Anglo-Saxons who were called up to fight

shield wall -  

the defensive line of shields used by Anglo-Saxon armies

infantry -  

foot soldiers

cavalry -  

soldiers on horseback

An image in a quiz

Additional material

  • Fundamentals NEW

Britannica Kids logo

  • Biographies
  • Compare Countries
  • World Atlas

Battle of Hastings

Related resources for this article.

  • Primary Sources & E-Books

The Norman Conquest , which brought tremendous changes to England , began with the decisive Battle of Hastings on October 14, 1066. Harold II , the last Anglo-Saxon king of England, was killed in this battle. On Christmas Day William, duke of Normandy, was crowned king. He became known as William the Conqueror .

After long preparations William set sail from Normandy. On September 28 he landed his army of 4,000 to 7,000 cavalry and infantry at Pevensey on the English Channel and moved eastward along the coast to Hastings. Harold hurried from the north of England with his army of about 7,000 men, many of whom were half-armed, untrained peasants. On October 13 Harold took a strong position on a hill between the port of Hastings and the present-day village of Battle. At dawn the next day William roused his troops and set out on an 8-mile (13-kilometer) march to join battle before Harold’s troops were rested.

All day the battle raged. Norman horsemen pressed up the hill. Standing close together and protected by great shields, the English wielded their long-handled battle-axes with terrible effect. Throughout the day William alternated cavalry charges with flights of arrows from his archers. Pretending retreat, he drew the English from their entrenched position and annihilated them. Harold was killed when an arrow pierced his eye. His brothers had already been slain. The English fought on until dusk. Then they fled, leaving the field to William. After the battle William and his army moved northward to isolate London.

The town of Hastings, which gave its name to the battle, is now a borough (district) in the administrative county of East Sussex. It is a thriving seaside resort.

It’s here: the NEW Britannica Kids website!

We’ve been busy, working hard to bring you new features and an updated design. We hope you and your family enjoy the NEW Britannica Kids. Take a minute to check out all the enhancements!

  • The same safe and trusted content for explorers of all ages.
  • Accessible across all of today's devices: phones, tablets, and desktops.
  • Improved homework resources designed to support a variety of curriculum subjects and standards.
  • A new, third level of content, designed specially to meet the advanced needs of the sophisticated scholar.
  • And so much more!

inspire icon

Want to see it in action?

subscribe icon

Start a free trial

To share with more than one person, separate addresses with a comma

Choose a language from the menu above to view a computer-translated version of this page. Please note: Text within images is not translated, some features may not work properly after translation, and the translation may not accurately convey the intended meaning. Britannica does not review the converted text.

After translating an article, all tools except font up/font down will be disabled. To re-enable the tools or to convert back to English, click "view original" on the Google Translate toolbar.

  • Privacy Notice
  • Terms of Use
  • Create new account
  • Reset your password

Register and get FREE resources and activities

Ready to unlock all our resources?

The Normans

primary homework help battle of hastings

Who were the Normans?

The Normans were the next group of people to rule England after the Anglo-Saxons . They built some of our most well-known castles , such as Windsor Castle and the Tower of London.

The Normans came from northern France, and invaded England in 1066 after King Edward the Confessor died without leaving an heir to the throne. They eventually defeated the Anglo-Saxons at the Battle of Hastings , when King Harold II was killed. The Normans ruled England for about 300 years.

Top 10 facts

  • The Normans came from northern France, in a region called Normandy.
  • The Normans invaded England in 1066 because they wanted to have Norman king in England after the Anglo-Saxon king died.
  • The first Norman king was William the Conqueror, who won the Battle of Hastings in 1066 against the Anglo-Saxons .
  • While the Normans planned their invasion, the Vikings were also interested in taking over England – they were led by Viking King Harald Hardrada.
  • William the Conqueror published the Domesday Book , which tells us a lot about the people who lived in England in the 11th century.
  • The Bayeux Tapestry tells a story in pictures about the Norman invasion of Britain and the Battle of Hastings.
  • The Bayeux Tapestry also tells us things about Norman life, such as what clothes, armour and even boats looked like.
  • The Normans built wooden houses covered in a mixture of mud, dung and straw, which kept them warm in the winter.
  • The Normans also built stone castles – some of these are still standing today!
  • England in Norman times was ruled by the feudal system.

primary homework help battle of hastings

  • 14 October 1066 King Harold was killed in the Battle of Hastings, making William the Conqueror the new Norman king
  • 25 December 1066 William the Conqueror was crowned at Westminster Abbey, making him King William I.
  • 1399 Henry Bolingbroke took over the throne and became the first king from the house of Lancaster (Henry IV), ending the rule of Norman kings

Learning journey programme

Boost Your Child's Learning Today!

  • Let us create a tailored plan for your child
  • English & maths resources added each week to your plan
  • Watch your child leap ahead in their learning & confidence

Did you know?

  • The first Norman King was William I, but most people know him by the name ‘William the Conqueror’ because he defeated the Anglo-Saxons in the Battle of Hastings in 1066.
  • After the Normans invaded England and won the Battle of Hastings against the Anglo Saxons , they made a special project to mark the events – the Bayeux Tapestry. It’s actually not a tapestry, but a very large embroidery made up of small stitches outlining different pictures on a piece of fabric. The pictures show what happened during the Norman invasion and the Battle of Hastings.
  • The Normans lived a very similar sort of lifestyle to the Anglo-Saxons, but their houses were a little different. They made them with a wood frame that was covered in ‘wattle and daub’, which was mud and dung (animal poo!) mixed with straw.
  • The Normans built some of the first stone castles in England, including Windsor Castle and the Tower of London . They wanted to make sure that they could defend England from any more invaders, and being inside a strong stone castle was a good way to do that.

Look at the gallery below and see if you can identify the following:

  • The Domesday Book
  • A scene from the Bayeux Tapestry
  • A Norman-style house
  • Windsor Castle
  • The Tower of London
  • Clifford's Tower, York, dates from the 13th century
  • A Norman church
  • A Norman-style catapult
  • Women’s clothing in Norman times
  • A re-enactment of the Battle of Hastings in 2015

primary homework help battle of hastings

The Normans invaded England because they thought William the Conqueror , who was also the Duke of Normandy, should be king instead of Harold. When King Edward the Confessor died there wasn’t anyone else in line to take the throne, so this meant that a few different people thought they should be king. It also meant that 1066, when Edward died, was not a peaceful year. Besides the Normans, another group of people who wanted to try to take the English throne were the Vikings . The Viking king of Norway, Harald Hardrada , thought he’d have a chance at being king of England because he was related to King Canute the Great. Harald conquered York, but when King Harold II heard this he sent an army up to take York back. The Anglo-Saxons won, but then had to rush back south to fight against William and the Normans! On 14 October 1066 the battle of Hastings was fought and the Anglo-Saxons lost. The Bayeux Tapestry is an important artefact from the Norman period, and it’s currently displayed in Normandy in France. It has 72 pictures of different events during the Norman invasion, and it was made in eight strips that were joined together. This makes it about 70 metres long – almost as long as a football pitch! Some of the last panel is missing so we don’t know how long it would have been when it was made in the 11th century. It begins with scenes about Anglo-Saxon King Edward the Confessor, and ends with the death of King Harold in the Battle of Hastings . When William the Conqueror became king, he established the feudal system . It put everyone into a sort of queue depending on what their place in society was, and explained who they needed to pay money or tribute to in order to have a house, grow food, etc.

  • The king was at the front of the queue and owned all the land in England. He then gave land to the barons, who could give the king knights and money if he needed it.
  • The barons were allowed to rent out the land that the king gave them to the knights, who protected and provided for the baron, and went into battle if the barons told them to.
  • The knights could rent out the land they were given to serfs (also called villeins), who were at the end of the queue. They could never leave their master’s manor, and they worked for the knights without getting paid. Serfs pretty much had to do whatever the knight asked – they even had to ask permission if they wanted to get married.

The Domesday Book is an important contribution to history from the Normans. When he first became king, William the Conqueror made a record of how many people lived in England, and what they owned, and had it published as the Domesday Book. He figured out how much tax people owed him from this, which became part of the feudal system of government that people in Norman times lived by. Today, we use the Domesday Book to learn more about the people who lived in Norman times. Men in Norman times usually wore baggy shirts and trousers with a tunic and cloak over them. Wealthier people would have more decorations and designs on their clothes. Women also dressed differently depending on their rank in society – serfs wore loose-fitting dresses and wimples (a type of hood that fastened under the chin), while wealthier women who didn’t work as much wore more fitted dresses with long, flowing sleeves.

Names to know (Norman kings and when they ruled, listed in order):

William I, the Conqueror (king from 1066-1087) William II, Rufus (king from 1087-1100) – William II was called Rufus (which means ‘reddish’) because he had a red face, and not because he had red hair Henry I, Beauclerc (king from 1100-1135) – Henry I was called Beauclerc because he was very well educated – it means ‘fine scholar’ Stephen (king from 1135-1154, though Empress Matilda ruled England for a few months in 1141)

Related Videos

Just for fun...

  • Sing along to the Horrible Histories Wicked William the Conqueror Song
  • Test your Norman knowledge with this 20-question quiz
  • Make a Bayeaux Tapestry of your own
  • Search the Domesday book for your own town or village
  • Organise your own Norman feast and bake some Norman spiced date loaf
  • Read a fantastic English Heritage kids' magazine about the Normans, The Kids Rule! Guide to the Norman Conquest
  • Try some Norman castle activities
  • Get help from an adult and cook the Norman way with recipes for  girdle bread and frumenty
  • Gather a group of friends and play a Battle of Hastings history game
  • Try some Domesday Book hands-on activities

Children's books about 1066, William the Conqueror and the Normans

primary homework help battle of hastings

Find out more:

  • Watch a BBC introduction to the Normans
  • A children's guide to the Normans
  • 1066 and the Norman conquest : the facts explained in a BBC step-by-step guide
  • The Domesday Book  explained for children
  • About the Bayeux Tapestry
  • See each scene in the Bayeux Tapestry  and read a short description about what’s going on
  • More information about Norman motte and bailey castles and how they were built
  • Information about the Normans in Ireland
  • Look at a  Norman penny , minted between 1083 and 1087 during the reign of William I
  • Learn to identify a Norman church  and a Norman castle
  • A diagram to explain the feudal system in the Middle Ages
  • Find out more about food in Norman times
  • Find out what the Domesday Book tells us about English life in the 11th century
  • Read children's fiction set in Norman times

See for yourself

  • This Norman village, Mountfitchet Castle , was recreated to look like it would have done in 1066
  • See Windsor Castle , built by William the Conqueror
  • A replica of the Bayeux Tapestry was made in the 19th century, and is on display at the Museum of Reading
  • See the site of the Battle of Hastings in Sussex, and visit the Abbey that William the Conqueror had built on the spot where King Harold II died

primary homework help battle of hastings

Give your child a headstart

  • FREE articles & expert information
  • FREE resources & activities
  • FREE homework help

primary homework help battle of hastings

  • International
  • Education Jobs
  • Schools directory
  • Resources Education Jobs Schools directory News Search

*Full Lesson* The Battle of Hastings: What happened at Hastings

*Full Lesson* The Battle of Hastings: What happened at Hastings

Subject: History

Age range: 11-14

Resource type: Lesson (complete)

Shop

Last updated

10 September 2018

  • Share through email
  • Share through twitter
  • Share through linkedin
  • Share through facebook
  • Share through pinterest

pptx, 6.2 MB

Tes paid licence How can I reuse this?

Get this resource as part of a bundle and save up to 53%

A bundle is a package of resources grouped together to teach a particular topic, or a series of lessons, in one place.

*6 Full Lessons* Battle of Hastings 1066

This bundle contains six full lessons of a scheme of work about the Battle of Hastings. The lessons included in the bundle are: Lesson 1: Claimant to the Throne Lesson 2: The Battle of Stamford Bridge Lesson 3: Battle of Hastings Soldiers Lesson 4: What happened at Hastings Lesson 5: Battle of Hastings assessment Lesson 6: Why did William win the Battle of Hastings. All lessons are ready to go and include all necessary resources. Click on my username above to see the rest of my resources. If you buy this bundle, please make sure to leave a review. Thanks

Your rating is required to reflect your happiness.

It's good to leave some feedback.

Something went wrong, please try again later.

This resource hasn't been reviewed yet

To ensure quality for our reviews, only customers who have purchased this resource can review it

Report this resource to let us know if it violates our terms and conditions. Our customer service team will review your report and will be in touch.

Not quite what you were looking for? Search by keyword to find the right resource:

Bayeux Tapestry - Battle of Hastings

by Mandy Barrow

The English made to protect themselves from the Norman cavalry.

Both sides wore which gave them much protection.

A coat of mail would weigh about thirty pounds, depending on length, light enough for a horse to carry without tiring, and also supple and flexiable.

Contents

- introduction

(includes family tree)

Houses, clothes, food


The Battle of Hastings

- plus Domesday Book info

- introduction

Part one

Part two

| | | |

- please read
All the materials on these pages are free for homework and classroom use only. You may not redistribute, sell or place the content of this page on or without written permission from the author Mandy Barrow.

©Copyright Mandy Barrow 2013 primaryhomeworkhelp.com

Follow me on Twitter @mbarrow

I teach computers at The Granville School and St. John's Primary School in Sevenoaks Kent.

IMAGES

  1. The Battle of Hastings Facts, Worksheets, Context, Causes, Harolds Death

    primary homework help battle of hastings

  2. Battle of Hastings Timeline of Events

    primary homework help battle of hastings

  3. The Battle of Hastings Activities

    primary homework help battle of hastings

  4. The Battle of Hastings Handout

    primary homework help battle of hastings

  5. Homework help battle hastings, Homework help battle hastings. Battle of

    primary homework help battle of hastings

  6. The Battle of Hastings: English ESL worksheets pdf & doc

    primary homework help battle of hastings

VIDEO

  1. assignment

  2. assignment

COMMENTS

  1. What happened at the Battle of Hastings?

    1837. 1939. What happened at the Battle of Hastings? At first the Normans were unable to pierce through the massed ranks of the English infantry. For six hours until late afternoon the English seemed like they were going to win. The Normans charged again and again, but they couldn't break through the Saxon shield wall and had to go back down ...

  2. The Normans and the Battle of Hastings for Kids

    The Norman invasion of England in 1066 is described through the images of the Bayeux Tapestry. The following pages introduce you to the main claimants to the throne and the battles that followed. K ing Edward lll of England (called " The Confessor " because he built Westminster Abbey) died on January 5, 1066, after a reign of 23 years.

  3. The Battle of Hastings

    The events of the battle. The Battle of Hastings began at 9am on 14 October 1066. Harold's army was lined up at the top of Senlac Hill, forming a shield wall facing down against William's army.

  4. Battle of Hastings

    At the Battle of Hastings, William , duke of Normandy, defeated King Harold II to win the English throne. The battle took place on October 14, 1066. It marked the beginning of the Norman Conquest of England .

  5. 1066: the Battle of Hastings

    Top 10 facts. 1. The Battle of Hastings took place on the 14th October 1066. 2. The battle was fought between William of Normandy and King Harold (Godwinson). 3. William of Normandy was also known as William the Conqueror. 4. William entered the battle with an army of 15,000 soldiers.

  6. Bayeux Tapestry and The Battle of Hastings 1066

    793. 1066. 1485. 1837. 1939. What is the Bayeux Tapestry about? The Bayeux Tapestry tells the story, in pictures ,of the events leading up to and including the Battle of Hastings on October 14, 1066. The story is told from the Norman point of view. There is no English equivalent so it is very difficult to confirm or dispute some of the details ...

  7. Lesson: The Battle of Hastings (1066)

    Starting with the earliest event, put these events in the Battle of Hastings in order. 1. - Harold's army form a shield wall at the top of Senlac Hill. 2. - William's archers and cavalry start to attack the shield wall, without success. 3.

  8. Battle of Hastings

    Battle of Hastings. The Norman Conquest, which brought tremendous changes to England, began with the decisive Battle of Hastings on October 14, 1066. Harold II, the last Anglo-Saxon king of England, was killed in this battle. On Christmas Day William, duke of Normandy, was crowned king. He became known as William the Conqueror.

  9. What Happened During the Battle of Hastings?

    They were tired and had lost many good soldiers. The Battle of Hastings took place on October 14th 1066 and lasted all day. Harold's army had a tactical advantage as they were high up on a hill. However, William's army pretended to retreat and when Harold's soldiers chased after them, they turned back and fought until they won the battle ...

  10. The Battle of Hastings

    The Bayeux Tapestry is the main piece of evidence for the Battle of Hastings, famous across the world. This medieval piece of art tells the story of the events from 1064 until 1066 using pictorial scenes.Again, it depicts the Norman perspective on the events of 1066, however, it is the main source of evidence for the Battle of Hastings and the Norman conquest of England. 1066 and the Battle of ...

  11. Primary Homework Help Battle of Hastings

    Primary Homework Help Battle of Hastings - Free download as PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free.

  12. The Battle of Hastings Activities

    The Battle of Hastings Activities. Have fun with these great Battle of Hastings-themed activities. With drama, poetry, reading, art and craft activities there sure to be something to inspire and engage everyone! Try to put the main events of the Battle of Hastings into the correct order with this great Battle of Hastings Sequencing Activity.

  13. Battle of Hastings Timeline of Events

    September 27th 1066 - William of Normandy and his army invade England. King Harold and his army march south to meet them. October 14th 1066 - the Battle of Hastings takes place. King Harold is killed and William of Normandy declares victory. December 25th 1066 - William of Normandy is crowned King of England.

  14. KS3 Battle of Hastings Homework Booklet

    Subject: History. Age range: 11-14. Resource type: Worksheet/Activity. File previews. docx, 419.09 KB. Homework booklet aimed at year 7 with tasks about the events leading up to and including the Battle of Hastings. Could be used as tasks in lessons too. 6 tasks in total: Claimants to the throne.

  15. The Normans

    The first Norman King was William I, but most people know him by the name 'William the Conqueror' because he defeated the Anglo-Saxons in the Battle of Hastings in 1066. After the Normans invaded England and won the Battle of Hastings against the Anglo Saxons, they made a special project to mark the events - the Bayeux Tapestry. It's ...

  16. Bayeux Tapestry and The Battle of Hastings 1066

    1066. 1485. 1837. 1939. We can see on the Tapestry that.... The Normans Knights had horses unlike the English who were on foot. The Normans had an advantage by using horses in the battle. The horses, however, were not armoured.This made them especially vulnerable when attacking a shield wall. Spears and javelins are the most common weapons used ...

  17. Battle of Hastings Primary Homework Help

    Battle of Hastings Primary Homework Help - Free download as PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free.

  18. Battle of Hastings KS2 Comprehension

    This Battle of Hastings KS2 differentiated reading comprehension is a clear and factual account of how the battle came about, the main people involved, such as William Duke of Normandy, and what happened during and after the battle.It can be used in your LKS2 lessons as a whole class teaching tool or for small groups to use for independent research. Covering an important time in British ...

  19. PDF The Battle of Hastings

    The Battle of Hastings. On 14thOctober, the battle began. William's troops raced up the hill on foot to attack Harold's army. It was hard running up hill and they could not break Harold's shield wall. The battle lasted for around thirty minutes and William's forces suffered heavy losses.

  20. *Full Lesson* The Battle of Hastings: What happened at Hastings

    This is the fourth lesson in a scheme of work about the Battle of Hastings. The lessons are aimed towards year 7 but could easily be adapted for other year levels. This lesson is ready to go and includes all resources. During this lesson, pupils will: - Complete a thinking activity to decide where Godwinson should place his men on the battlefield.

  21. Where did William fight Harold for the English Throne? New site

    A new site for the Battle of Hastings has been identified by the historian and amateur archaeologist Nick Austin, two miles nearer the port of Hastings at Crowhurst. Crowhurst is a small village equidistant between Battle and Hastings. It's name is most likely to have come from the Anglo Saxon word 'Crohha hyrst' (muddy wooded hill).

  22. Weapons used in The Battle of Hastings 1066

    AD 43. 450. 793. 1066. 1485. 1837. 1939. The main weapons for both sides are clubs, maces, swords and spears. A typical spear used during the battle was seven or eight feet long.

  23. Bayeux Tapestry and The Battle of Hastings 1066

    1066. 1485. 1837. 1939. The English made shield walls to protect themselves from the Norman cavalry. Both sides wore chain mail armour which gave them much protection. Chain mail armour consists of small metal rings linked together in a pattern to form a mesh. A coat of mail would weigh about thirty pounds, depending on length, light enough for ...