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Tips and Examples for Writing Thesis Statements

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Tips for Writing Your Thesis Statement

1. Determine what kind of paper you are writing:

  • An analytical paper breaks down an issue or an idea into its component parts, evaluates the issue or idea, and presents this breakdown and evaluation to the audience.
  • An expository (explanatory) paper explains something to the audience.
  • An argumentative paper makes a claim about a topic and justifies this claim with specific evidence. The claim could be an opinion, a policy proposal, an evaluation, a cause-and-effect statement, or an interpretation. The goal of the argumentative paper is to convince the audience that the claim is true based on the evidence provided.

If you are writing a text that does not fall under these three categories (e.g., a narrative), a thesis statement somewhere in the first paragraph could still be helpful to your reader.

2. Your thesis statement should be specific—it should cover only what you will discuss in your paper and should be supported with specific evidence.

3. The thesis statement usually appears at the end of the first paragraph of a paper.

4. Your topic may change as you write, so you may need to revise your thesis statement to reflect exactly what you have discussed in the paper.

Thesis Statement Examples

Example of an analytical thesis statement:

The paper that follows should:

  • Explain the analysis of the college admission process
  • Explain the challenge facing admissions counselors

Example of an expository (explanatory) thesis statement:

  • Explain how students spend their time studying, attending class, and socializing with peers

Example of an argumentative thesis statement:

  • Present an argument and give evidence to support the claim that students should pursue community projects before entering college

Reference management. Clean and simple.

How to write a thesis statement + examples

Thesis statement

What is a thesis statement?

Is a thesis statement a question, how do you write a good thesis statement, how do i know if my thesis statement is good, examples of thesis statements, helpful resources on how to write a thesis statement, frequently asked questions about writing a thesis statement, related articles.

A thesis statement is the main argument of your paper or thesis.

The thesis statement is one of the most important elements of any piece of academic writing . It is a brief statement of your paper’s main argument. Essentially, you are stating what you will be writing about.

You can see your thesis statement as an answer to a question. While it also contains the question, it should really give an answer to the question with new information and not just restate or reiterate it.

Your thesis statement is part of your introduction. Learn more about how to write a good thesis introduction in our introduction guide .

A thesis statement is not a question. A statement must be arguable and provable through evidence and analysis. While your thesis might stem from a research question, it should be in the form of a statement.

Tip: A thesis statement is typically 1-2 sentences. For a longer project like a thesis, the statement may be several sentences or a paragraph.

A good thesis statement needs to do the following:

  • Condense the main idea of your thesis into one or two sentences.
  • Answer your project’s main research question.
  • Clearly state your position in relation to the topic .
  • Make an argument that requires support or evidence.

Once you have written down a thesis statement, check if it fulfills the following criteria:

  • Your statement needs to be provable by evidence. As an argument, a thesis statement needs to be debatable.
  • Your statement needs to be precise. Do not give away too much information in the thesis statement and do not load it with unnecessary information.
  • Your statement cannot say that one solution is simply right or simply wrong as a matter of fact. You should draw upon verified facts to persuade the reader of your solution, but you cannot just declare something as right or wrong.

As previously mentioned, your thesis statement should answer a question.

If the question is:

What do you think the City of New York should do to reduce traffic congestion?

A good thesis statement restates the question and answers it:

In this paper, I will argue that the City of New York should focus on providing exclusive lanes for public transport and adaptive traffic signals to reduce traffic congestion by the year 2035.

Here is another example. If the question is:

How can we end poverty?

A good thesis statement should give more than one solution to the problem in question:

In this paper, I will argue that introducing universal basic income can help reduce poverty and positively impact the way we work.

  • The Writing Center of the University of North Carolina has a list of questions to ask to see if your thesis is strong .

A thesis statement is part of the introduction of your paper. It is usually found in the first or second paragraph to let the reader know your research purpose from the beginning.

In general, a thesis statement should have one or two sentences. But the length really depends on the overall length of your project. Take a look at our guide about the length of thesis statements for more insight on this topic.

Here is a list of Thesis Statement Examples that will help you understand better how to write them.

Every good essay should include a thesis statement as part of its introduction, no matter the academic level. Of course, if you are a high school student you are not expected to have the same type of thesis as a PhD student.

Here is a great YouTube tutorial showing How To Write An Essay: Thesis Statements .

how to write a thesis paper

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How to write a thesis statement, what is a thesis statement.

Almost all of us—even if we don’t do it consciously—look early in an essay for a one- or two-sentence condensation of the argument or analysis that is to follow. We refer to that condensation as a thesis statement.

Why Should Your Essay Contain a Thesis Statement?

  • to test your ideas by distilling them into a sentence or two
  • to better organize and develop your argument
  • to provide your reader with a “guide” to your argument

In general, your thesis statement will accomplish these goals if you think of the thesis as the answer to the question your paper explores.

How Can You Write a Good Thesis Statement?

Here are some helpful hints to get you started. You can either scroll down or select a link to a specific topic.

How to Generate a Thesis Statement if the Topic is Assigned How to Generate a Thesis Statement if the Topic is not Assigned How to Tell a Strong Thesis Statement from a Weak One

How to Generate a Thesis Statement if the Topic is Assigned

Almost all assignments, no matter how complicated, can be reduced to a single question. Your first step, then, is to distill the assignment into a specific question. For example, if your assignment is, “Write a report to the local school board explaining the potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class,” turn the request into a question like, “What are the potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class?” After you’ve chosen the question your essay will answer, compose one or two complete sentences answering that question.

Q: “What are the potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class?” A: “The potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class are . . .”
A: “Using computers in a fourth-grade class promises to improve . . .”

The answer to the question is the thesis statement for the essay.

[ Back to top ]

How to Generate a Thesis Statement if the Topic is not Assigned

Even if your assignment doesn’t ask a specific question, your thesis statement still needs to answer a question about the issue you’d like to explore. In this situation, your job is to figure out what question you’d like to write about.

A good thesis statement will usually include the following four attributes:

  • take on a subject upon which reasonable people could disagree
  • deal with a subject that can be adequately treated given the nature of the assignment
  • express one main idea
  • assert your conclusions about a subject

Let’s see how to generate a thesis statement for a social policy paper.

Brainstorm the topic . Let’s say that your class focuses upon the problems posed by changes in the dietary habits of Americans. You find that you are interested in the amount of sugar Americans consume.

You start out with a thesis statement like this:

Sugar consumption.

This fragment isn’t a thesis statement. Instead, it simply indicates a general subject. Furthermore, your reader doesn’t know what you want to say about sugar consumption.

Narrow the topic . Your readings about the topic, however, have led you to the conclusion that elementary school children are consuming far more sugar than is healthy.

You change your thesis to look like this:

Reducing sugar consumption by elementary school children.

This fragment not only announces your subject, but it focuses on one segment of the population: elementary school children. Furthermore, it raises a subject upon which reasonable people could disagree, because while most people might agree that children consume more sugar than they used to, not everyone would agree on what should be done or who should do it. You should note that this fragment is not a thesis statement because your reader doesn’t know your conclusions on the topic.

Take a position on the topic. After reflecting on the topic a little while longer, you decide that what you really want to say about this topic is that something should be done to reduce the amount of sugar these children consume.

You revise your thesis statement to look like this:

More attention should be paid to the food and beverage choices available to elementary school children.

This statement asserts your position, but the terms more attention and food and beverage choices are vague.

Use specific language . You decide to explain what you mean about food and beverage choices , so you write:

Experts estimate that half of elementary school children consume nine times the recommended daily allowance of sugar.

This statement is specific, but it isn’t a thesis. It merely reports a statistic instead of making an assertion.

Make an assertion based on clearly stated support. You finally revise your thesis statement one more time to look like this:

Because half of all American elementary school children consume nine times the recommended daily allowance of sugar, schools should be required to replace the beverages in soda machines with healthy alternatives.

Notice how the thesis answers the question, “What should be done to reduce sugar consumption by children, and who should do it?” When you started thinking about the paper, you may not have had a specific question in mind, but as you became more involved in the topic, your ideas became more specific. Your thesis changed to reflect your new insights.

How to Tell a Strong Thesis Statement from a Weak One

1. a strong thesis statement takes some sort of stand..

Remember that your thesis needs to show your conclusions about a subject. For example, if you are writing a paper for a class on fitness, you might be asked to choose a popular weight-loss product to evaluate. Here are two thesis statements:

There are some negative and positive aspects to the Banana Herb Tea Supplement.

This is a weak thesis statement. First, it fails to take a stand. Second, the phrase negative and positive aspects is vague.

Because Banana Herb Tea Supplement promotes rapid weight loss that results in the loss of muscle and lean body mass, it poses a potential danger to customers.

This is a strong thesis because it takes a stand, and because it's specific.

2. A strong thesis statement justifies discussion.

Your thesis should indicate the point of the discussion. If your assignment is to write a paper on kinship systems, using your own family as an example, you might come up with either of these two thesis statements:

My family is an extended family.

This is a weak thesis because it merely states an observation. Your reader won’t be able to tell the point of the statement, and will probably stop reading.

While most American families would view consanguineal marriage as a threat to the nuclear family structure, many Iranian families, like my own, believe that these marriages help reinforce kinship ties in an extended family.

This is a strong thesis because it shows how your experience contradicts a widely-accepted view. A good strategy for creating a strong thesis is to show that the topic is controversial. Readers will be interested in reading the rest of the essay to see how you support your point.

3. A strong thesis statement expresses one main idea.

Readers need to be able to see that your paper has one main point. If your thesis statement expresses more than one idea, then you might confuse your readers about the subject of your paper. For example:

Companies need to exploit the marketing potential of the Internet, and Web pages can provide both advertising and customer support.

This is a weak thesis statement because the reader can’t decide whether the paper is about marketing on the Internet or Web pages. To revise the thesis, the relationship between the two ideas needs to become more clear. One way to revise the thesis would be to write:

Because the Internet is filled with tremendous marketing potential, companies should exploit this potential by using Web pages that offer both advertising and customer support.

This is a strong thesis because it shows that the two ideas are related. Hint: a great many clear and engaging thesis statements contain words like because , since , so , although , unless , and however .

4. A strong thesis statement is specific.

A thesis statement should show exactly what your paper will be about, and will help you keep your paper to a manageable topic. For example, if you're writing a seven-to-ten page paper on hunger, you might say:

World hunger has many causes and effects.

This is a weak thesis statement for two major reasons. First, world hunger can’t be discussed thoroughly in seven to ten pages. Second, many causes and effects is vague. You should be able to identify specific causes and effects. A revised thesis might look like this:

Hunger persists in Glandelinia because jobs are scarce and farming in the infertile soil is rarely profitable.

This is a strong thesis statement because it narrows the subject to a more specific and manageable topic, and it also identifies the specific causes for the existence of hunger.

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Writing a Paper: Thesis Statements

Basics of thesis statements.

The thesis statement is the brief articulation of your paper's central argument and purpose. You might hear it referred to as simply a "thesis." Every scholarly paper should have a thesis statement, and strong thesis statements are concise, specific, and arguable. Concise means the thesis is short: perhaps one or two sentences for a shorter paper. Specific means the thesis deals with a narrow and focused topic, appropriate to the paper's length. Arguable means that a scholar in your field could disagree (or perhaps already has!).

Strong thesis statements address specific intellectual questions, have clear positions, and use a structure that reflects the overall structure of the paper. Read on to learn more about constructing a strong thesis statement.

Being Specific

This thesis statement has no specific argument:

Needs Improvement: In this essay, I will examine two scholarly articles to find similarities and differences.

This statement is concise, but it is neither specific nor arguable—a reader might wonder, "Which scholarly articles? What is the topic of this paper? What field is the author writing in?" Additionally, the purpose of the paper—to "examine…to find similarities and differences" is not of a scholarly level. Identifying similarities and differences is a good first step, but strong academic argument goes further, analyzing what those similarities and differences might mean or imply.

Better: In this essay, I will argue that Bowler's (2003) autocratic management style, when coupled with Smith's (2007) theory of social cognition, can reduce the expenses associated with employee turnover.

The new revision here is still concise, as well as specific and arguable.  We can see that it is specific because the writer is mentioning (a) concrete ideas and (b) exact authors.  We can also gather the field (business) and the topic (management and employee turnover). The statement is arguable because the student goes beyond merely comparing; he or she draws conclusions from that comparison ("can reduce the expenses associated with employee turnover").

Making a Unique Argument

This thesis draft repeats the language of the writing prompt without making a unique argument:

Needs Improvement: The purpose of this essay is to monitor, assess, and evaluate an educational program for its strengths and weaknesses. Then, I will provide suggestions for improvement.

You can see here that the student has simply stated the paper's assignment, without articulating specifically how he or she will address it. The student can correct this error simply by phrasing the thesis statement as a specific answer to the assignment prompt.

Better: Through a series of student interviews, I found that Kennedy High School's antibullying program was ineffective. In order to address issues of conflict between students, I argue that Kennedy High School should embrace policies outlined by the California Department of Education (2010).

Words like "ineffective" and "argue" show here that the student has clearly thought through the assignment and analyzed the material; he or she is putting forth a specific and debatable position. The concrete information ("student interviews," "antibullying") further prepares the reader for the body of the paper and demonstrates how the student has addressed the assignment prompt without just restating that language.

Creating a Debate

This thesis statement includes only obvious fact or plot summary instead of argument:

Needs Improvement: Leadership is an important quality in nurse educators.

A good strategy to determine if your thesis statement is too broad (and therefore, not arguable) is to ask yourself, "Would a scholar in my field disagree with this point?" Here, we can see easily that no scholar is likely to argue that leadership is an unimportant quality in nurse educators.  The student needs to come up with a more arguable claim, and probably a narrower one; remember that a short paper needs a more focused topic than a dissertation.

Better: Roderick's (2009) theory of participatory leadership  is particularly appropriate to nurse educators working within the emergency medicine field, where students benefit most from collegial and kinesthetic learning.

Here, the student has identified a particular type of leadership ("participatory leadership"), narrowing the topic, and has made an arguable claim (this type of leadership is "appropriate" to a specific type of nurse educator). Conceivably, a scholar in the nursing field might disagree with this approach. The student's paper can now proceed, providing specific pieces of evidence to support the arguable central claim.

Choosing the Right Words

This thesis statement uses large or scholarly-sounding words that have no real substance:

Needs Improvement: Scholars should work to seize metacognitive outcomes by harnessing discipline-based networks to empower collaborative infrastructures.

There are many words in this sentence that may be buzzwords in the student's field or key terms taken from other texts, but together they do not communicate a clear, specific meaning. Sometimes students think scholarly writing means constructing complex sentences using special language, but actually it's usually a stronger choice to write clear, simple sentences. When in doubt, remember that your ideas should be complex, not your sentence structure.

Better: Ecologists should work to educate the U.S. public on conservation methods by making use of local and national green organizations to create a widespread communication plan.

Notice in the revision that the field is now clear (ecology), and the language has been made much more field-specific ("conservation methods," "green organizations"), so the reader is able to see concretely the ideas the student is communicating.

Leaving Room for Discussion

This thesis statement is not capable of development or advancement in the paper:

Needs Improvement: There are always alternatives to illegal drug use.

This sample thesis statement makes a claim, but it is not a claim that will sustain extended discussion. This claim is the type of claim that might be appropriate for the conclusion of a paper, but in the beginning of the paper, the student is left with nowhere to go. What further points can be made? If there are "always alternatives" to the problem the student is identifying, then why bother developing a paper around that claim? Ideally, a thesis statement should be complex enough to explore over the length of the entire paper.

Better: The most effective treatment plan for methamphetamine addiction may be a combination of pharmacological and cognitive therapy, as argued by Baker (2008), Smith (2009), and Xavier (2011).

In the revised thesis, you can see the student make a specific, debatable claim that has the potential to generate several pages' worth of discussion. When drafting a thesis statement, think about the questions your thesis statement will generate: What follow-up inquiries might a reader have? In the first example, there are almost no additional questions implied, but the revised example allows for a good deal more exploration.

Thesis Mad Libs

If you are having trouble getting started, try using the models below to generate a rough model of a thesis statement! These models are intended for drafting purposes only and should not appear in your final work.

  • In this essay, I argue ____, using ______ to assert _____.
  • While scholars have often argued ______, I argue______, because_______.
  • Through an analysis of ______, I argue ______, which is important because_______.

Words to Avoid and to Embrace

When drafting your thesis statement, avoid words like explore, investigate, learn, compile, summarize , and explain to describe the main purpose of your paper. These words imply a paper that summarizes or "reports," rather than synthesizing and analyzing.

Instead of the terms above, try words like argue, critique, question , and interrogate . These more analytical words may help you begin strongly, by articulating a specific, critical, scholarly position.

Read Kayla's blog post for tips on taking a stand in a well-crafted thesis statement.

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HOW TO WRITE A THESIS: Steps by step guide

how to write a thesis paper

Introduction

In the academic world, one of the hallmark rites signifying mastery of a course or academic area is the writing of a thesis . Essentially a thesis is a typewritten work, usually 50 to 350 pages in length depending on institutions, discipline, and educational level which is often aimed at addressing a particular problem in a given field.

While a thesis is inadequate to address all the problems in a given field, it is succinct enough to address a specialized aspect of the problem by taking a stance or making a claim on what the resolution of the problem should be. Writing a thesis can be a very daunting task because most times it is the first complex research undertaking for the student. The lack of research and writing skills to write a thesis coupled with fear and a limited time frame are factors that makes the writing of a thesis daunting. However, commitment to excellence on the part of the student combined with some of the techniques and methods that will be discussed below gives a fair chance that the student will be able to deliver an excellent thesis regardless of the subject area, the depth of the research specialization and the daunting amount of materials that must be comprehended(RE: write a thesis or writing a thesis).

Contact us now if you need help with writing your thesis. Check out our services

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What is a thesis?

A thesis is a statement, theory, argument, proposal or proposition, which is put forward as a premise to be maintained or proved. It explains the stand someone takes on an issue and how the person intends to justify the stand. It is always better to pick a topic that will be able to render professional help, a topic that you will be happy to talk about with anybody, a topic you have personal interest and passion for, because when writing a thesis gets frustrating personal interest, happiness and passion coupled with the professional help it will be easier to write a great thesis (see you through the thesis). One has to source for a lot of information concerning the topic one is writing a thesis on in order to know the important question, because for you to take a good stand on an issue you have to study the evidence first.

Qualities of a good thesis

A good thesis has the following qualities

  • A good thesis must solve an existing problem in the society, organisation, government among others.
  • A good thesis should be contestable, it should propose a point that is arguable which people can agree with or disagree.
  • It is specific, clear and focused.
  •   A good thesis does not use general terms and abstractions.  
  • The claims of a good thesis should be definable and arguable.
  • It anticipates the counter-argument s
  • It does not use unclear language
  • It avoids the first person. (“In my opinion”)
  • A strong thesis should be able to take a stand and not just taking a stand but should be able to justify the stand that is taken, so that the reader will be tempted to ask questions like how or why.
  • The thesis should be arguable, contestable, focused, specific, and clear. Make your thesis clear, strong and easy to find.
  • The conclusion of a thesis should be based on evidence.

Steps in writing a Thesis

  • First, think about good topics and theories that you can write before writing the thesis, then pick a topic. The topic or thesis statement is derived from a review of existing literature in the area of study that the researcher wants to explore. This route is taken when the unknowns in an area of study are not yet defined. Some areas of study have existing problems yearning to be solved and the drafting of the thesis topic or statement revolves around a selection of one of these problems.
  • Once you have a good thesis, put it down and draw an outline . The outline is like a map of the whole thesis and it covers more commonly the introduction, literature review, discussion of methodology, discussion of results and the thesis’ conclusions and recommendations. The outline might differ from one institution to another but the one described in the preceding sentence is what is more commonly obtainable. It is imperative at this point to note that the outline drew still requires other mini- outlines for each of the sections mentioned. The outlines and mini- outlines provide a graphical over- view of the whole project and can also be used in allocating the word- count for each section and sub- section based on the overall word- count requirement of the thesis(RE: write a thesis or writing a thesis).
  • Literature search. Remember to draw a good outline you need to do literature search to familiarize yourself with the concepts and the works of others. Similarly, to achieve this, you need to read as much material that contains necessary information as you can. There will always be a counter argument for everything so anticipate it because it will help shape your thesis. Read everything you can–academic research, trade literature, and information in the popular press and on the Internet(RE: write a thesis or writing a thesis).
  • After getting all the information you need, the knowledge you gathered should help in suggesting the aim of your thesis.

Remember; a thesis is not supposed to be a question or a list, thesis should specific and as clear as possible. The claims of a thesis should be definable and also arguable.

  • Then collecting and analyzing data, after data analysis, the result of the analysis should be written and discussed, followed by summary, conclusion, recommendations, list of references and the appendices
  • The last step is editing of the thesis and proper spell checking.

Structure of a Thesis

A conventional thesis has five chapters – chapter 1-5 which will be discussed in detail below. However, it is important to state that a thesis is not limited to any chapter or section as the case may be. In fact, a thesis can be five, six, seven or even eight chapters.  What determines the number of chapters in a thesis includes institution rules/ guideline, researcher choice, supervisor choice, programme or educational level. In fact, most PhD thesis are usually more than 5 chapters(RE: write a thesis or writing a thesis).

Preliminaries Pages: The preliminaries are the cover page, the title page, the table of contents page, and the abstract.

The introduction: The introduction is the first section and it provides as the name implies an introduction to the thesis. The introduction contains such aspects as the background to the study which provides information on the topic in the context of what is happening in the world as related to the topic. It also discusses the relevance of the topic to society, policies formulated success and failure. The introduction also contains the statement of the problem which is essentially a succinct description of the problem that the thesis want to solve and what the trend will be if the problem is not solved. The concluding part of the statement of problem ends with an outline of the research questions. These are the questions which when answered helps in achieving the aim of the thesis. The third section is the outline of research objectives. Conventionally research objectives re a conversion the research questions into an active statement form. Other parts of the introduction are a discussion of hypotheses (if any), the significance of the study, delimitations, proposed methodology and a discussion of the structure of the study(RE: write a thesis or writing a thesis).

The main body includes the following; the literature review, methodology, research results and discussion of the result, the summary, conclusion and recommendations, the list of references and the appendices.

The literature review : The literature review is often the most voluminous aspects of a thesis because it reviews past empirical and theoretical literature about the problem being studied. This section starts by discussing the concepts relevant to the problem as indicated in the topic, the relationship between the concepts and what discoveries have being made on topic based on the choice of methodologies. The validity of the studies reviewed are questioned and findings are compared in order to get a comprehensive picture of the problem. The literature review also discusses the theories and theoretical frameworks that are relevant to the problem, the gaps that are evident in literature and how the thesis being written helps in resolving some of the gaps.

The major importance of Literature review is that it specifies the gap in the existing knowledge (gap in literature). The source of the literature that is being reviewed should be specified. For instance; ‘It has been argued that if the rural youth are to be aware of their community development role they need to be educated’ Effiong, (1992). The author’s name can be at the beginning, end or in between the literature. The literature should be discussed and not just stated (RE: write a thesis or writing a thesis).

The methodology: The third section is a discussion of the research methodology adopted in the thesis and touches on aspects such as the research design, the area, population and sample that will be considered for the study as well as the sampling procedure. These aspects are discussed in terms of choice, method and rationale. This section also covers the sub- section of data collection, data analysis and measures of ensuring validity of study. It is the chapter 3. This chapter explains the method used in data collection and data analysis. It explains the methodology adopted and why it is the best method to be used, it also explains every step of data collection and analysis. The data used could be primary data or secondary data. While analysing the data, proper statistical tool should be used in order to fit the stated objectives of the thesis. The statistical tool could be; the spearman rank order correlation, chi square, analysis of variance (ANOVA) etc (RE: write a thesis or writing a thesis).

The findings and discussion of result : The next section is a discussion of findings based on the data collection instrumentation used and the objectives or hypotheses of study if any. It is the chapter 4. It is research results. This is the part that describes the research. It shows the result gotten from data that is collected and analysed. It discusses the result and how it relates to your profession.

Summary, Conclusion and Recommendation: This is normally the chapter 5. The last section discusses the summary of the study and the conclusions arrived at based on the findings discussed in the previous section. This section also presents any policy recommendations that the researcher wants to propose (RE: write a thesis or writing a thesis).

References: It cite all ideas, concepts, text, data that are not your own. It is acceptable to put the initials of the individual authors behind their last names. The way single author is referenced is different from the way more than one author is referenced (RE: write a thesis or writing a thesis).

The appendices; it includes all data in the appendix. Reference data or materials that is not easily available. It includes tables and calculations, List of equipment used for an experiment or details of complicated procedures. If a large number of references are consulted but all are not cited, it may also be included in the appendix. The appendices also contain supportive or complementary information like the questionnaire, the interview schedule, tables and charts while the references section contain an ordered list of all literature, academic and contemporary cited in the thesis. Different schools have their own preferred referencing styles(RE: write a thesis or writing a thesis).   

Follow the following steps to achieve successful thesis writing

Start writing early. Do not delay writing until you have finished your project or research. Write complete and concise “Technical Reports” as and when you finish each nugget of work. This way, you will remember everything you did and document it accurately, when the work is still fresh in your mind. This is especially so if your work involves programming.

Spot errors early. A well-written “Technical Report” will force you to think about what you have done, before you move on to something else. If anything is amiss, you will detect it at once and can easily correct it, rather than have to re-visit the work later, when you may be pressured for time and have lost touch with it.

Write your thesis from the inside out. Begin with the chapters on your own experimental work. You will develop confidence in writing them because you know your own work better than anyone else. Once you have overcome the initial inertia, move on to the other chapters.

End with a bang, not a whimper. First things first, and save the best for last. First and last impressions persist. Arrange your chapters so that your first and last experimental chapters are sound and solid.

Write the Introduction after writing the Conclusions. The examiner will read the Introduction first, and then the Conclusions, to see if the promises made in the former are indeed fulfilled in the latter. Ensure that your introduction and Conclusions match.

“No man is an Island”. The critical review of the literature places your work in context. Usually, one third of the PhD thesis is about others’ work; two thirds, what you have done yourself. After a thorough and critical literature review, the PhD candidate must be able to identify the major researchers in the field and make a sound proposal for doctoral research. Estimate the time to write your thesis and then multiply it by three to get the correct estimate. Writing at one stretch is very demanding and it is all too easy to underestimate the time required for it; inflating your first estimate by a factor of three is more realistic.

Punctuating your thesis

Punctuation Good punctuation makes reading easy. The simplest way to find out where to punctuate is to read aloud what you have written. Each time you pause, you should add a punctuation symbol. There are four major pause symbols, arranged below in ascending order of “degree of pause”:

  • Comma. Use the comma to indicate a short pause or to separate items in a list. A pair of commas may delimit the beginning and end of a subordinate clause or phrase. Sometimes, this is also done with a pair of “em dashes” which are printed like this:
  • Semi-colon. The semi-colon signifies a longer pause than the comma. It separates segments of a sentence that are “further apart” in position, or meaning, but which are nevertheless related. If the ideas were “closer together”, a comma would have been used. It is also used to separate two clauses that may stand on their own but which are too closely related for a colon or full stop to intervene between them.
  • Colon. The colon is used before one or more examples of a concept, and whenever items are to be listed in a visually separate fashion. The sentence that introduced the itemized list you are now reading ended in a colon. It may also be used to separate two fairly—but not totally—independent clauses in a sentence.
  • Full stop or period. The full stop ends a sentence. If the sentence embodies a question or an exclamation, then, of course, it is ended with a question mark or exclamation mark, respectively. The full stop is also used to terminate abbreviations like etc., (for et cetera), e.g., (for exempli gratia), et al., (for et alia) etc., but not with abbreviations for SI units. The readability of your writing will improve greatly if you take the trouble to learn the basic rules of punctuation given above.

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Crafting Your Thesis Statement: Formulating a Strong Research Question

Introduction     

Understanding the Thesis Statement   

4 Steps to Crafting a Strong Thesis Statement     

4 Steps to Formulate a Compelling Research Question    

Linking Thesis Statement and Research Question     

4 Common Pitfalls and How to Avoid Them     

Tips for Refining Your Thesis Statement and Research Question   

Conclusion   

Additional Resources

Introduction.

Formulating a strong thesis statement and research question is a pivotal step in the academic research process. These components not only guide the direction of your study but also establish a framework that underpins the entire research endeavour.

A well-crafted thesis statement and research question provide clarity, focus, and a roadmap for your research, ensuring that your work remains coherent and relevant. This blog post aims to provide a comprehensive guide to crafting a robust thesis statement and formulating a compelling research question.

Understanding the Thesis Statement

What is a thesis statement.

A thesis statement is a concise summary of the main point or claim of your research paper. It is typically one or two sentences long and presents your position on the topic you are researching. The thesis statement serves as the foundation for your entire paper, guiding your writing and keeping your arguments focused.

Importance of a Strong Thesis Statement

A strong thesis statement is essential for several reasons:

Direction and Focus: It provides a clear direction for your research and writing, helping you stay on track and avoid irrelevant tangents.

Clarity: It makes your main argument or claim clear to your readers, helping them understand the purpose and scope of your research.

Structure: It acts as a roadmap for your paper, outlining the main points you will cover and the evidence you will present.

4 Steps to Crafting a Strong Thesis Statement

Step 1: choose a topic.

The first step in crafting a strong thesis statement is choosing a topic that interests you and is relevant to your field of study. A good topic should be specific enough to allow for in-depth research and analysis but broad enough to provide adequate material for discussion.

Step 2: Conduct Preliminary Research

Before you can formulate a thesis statement, you need to conduct preliminary research to understand the existing literature on your topic. This research will help you identify gaps in the current knowledge, which you can address in your thesis statement. Look for patterns, themes, and unanswered questions that can inform your research.

Step 3: Refine Your Topic

Based on your preliminary research, refine your topic to ensure it is specific and manageable. A refined topic will make it easier to formulate a clear and focused thesis statement. Consider narrowing down broad topics to specific aspects or angles that are underexplored or particularly interesting.

Step 4: Formulate Your Thesis Statement

Now that you have a refined topic, you can formulate your thesis statement. A strong thesis statement should:

Be Specific: Clearly state your main point or claim without being too broad or vague.

Be Debatable: Present an argument or claim that can be supported with evidence and is open to challenge.

Be Clear: Use precise language to convey your position and avoid ambiguous or complex wording.

Examples of Strong Thesis Statements

Weak Thesis Statement: "Social media affects people."

Strong Thesis Statement: "Social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter have transformed personal communication by encouraging shorter, more frequent interactions, which have impacted users' attention spans and social skills."

Weak Thesis Statement: "Climate change is bad."

Strong Thesis Statement: "Climate change poses a significant threat to global biodiversity by accelerating habitat loss and altering ecosystems, which could lead to the extinction of numerous species."

Linking Thesis Statement and Research Question

A strong thesis statement and a compelling research question are interrelated. The research question sets the direction for your study, while the thesis statement presents your main argument or claim based on the research. Here’s how to link them effectively:

Align Your Thesis Statement with Your Research Question: Ensure that your thesis statement directly answers your research question. The thesis statement should present a clear position or argument that is supported by your research.

Use the Research Question to Guide Your Research: Your research question should guide the data collection, analysis, and interpretation processes. It helps you stay focused on gathering relevant information that will support your thesis statement.

Refine Both as Necessary: As you progress with your research, you may need to refine both your thesis statement and research question. This is a normal part of the research process and ensures that your study remains relevant and focused.

Example of Alignment

Research Question: "How has climate change affected wheat crop yields in the Midwestern United States over the past 20 years?"

Thesis Statement: "Climate change has significantly reduced wheat crop yields in the Midwestern United States over the past 20 years due to increased temperatures and changing precipitation patterns."

4 Common Pitfalls and How to Avoid Them

Pitfall 1: being too broad or too narrow.

A common mistake is formulating a thesis statement or research question that is either too broad or too narrow. A broad thesis statement or research question can make your research unfocused and overwhelming, while a narrow one can limit the scope and depth of your study.

Solution: Ensure your thesis statement and research question are specific and focused, but still allow for comprehensive analysis and discussion. Conduct preliminary research to gauge the scope and adjust as needed.

Pitfall 2: Lack of Clarity

Ambiguous or vague thesis statements and research questions can confuse your readers and make it difficult to convey your main points effectively.

Solution: Use clear and precise language when formulating your thesis statement and research question. Avoid jargon and complex wording that might obscure your main points.

Pitfall 3: Being Too Ambitious

Choosing a thesis statement or research question that is too ambitious can lead to unrealistic expectations and an unmanageable research project.

Solution: Be realistic about what you can achieve within the constraints of your study. Consider factors such as time, resources, and access to data when formulating your thesis statement and research question.

Pitfall 4: Ignoring Existing Research

Failing to consider existing research can result in a thesis statement or research question that lacks originality or relevance.

Solution: Conduct thorough preliminary research to understand the current state of knowledge on your topic. Identify gaps and areas for further investigation to ensure your research contributes new insights to the field.

Tips for Refining Your Thesis Statement and Research Question

Tip 1: Seek Feedback

Don’t hesitate to seek feedback from your advisors, peers, or mentors. They can provide valuable insights and suggestions to refine your thesis statement and research question. Constructive feedback can help you identify weaknesses and areas for improvement.

Tip 2: Stay Flexible

Be open to refining your thesis statement and research question as you progress with your research. New findings and insights may require adjustments to ensure your study remains relevant and focused.

Tip 3: Test Your Thesis Statement and Research Question

Test the feasibility of your thesis statement and research question by conducting a preliminary literature review and gathering initial data. This can help you identify potential challenges and refine your approach.

Tip 4: Use Analytical Frameworks

Consider using analytical frameworks or theoretical models to guide the formulation of your thesis statement and research question. These frameworks can provide structure and clarity to your research.

Tip 5: Align with Research Objectives

Ensure that your thesis statement and research question align with your overall research objectives and goals. This alignment will help you stay focused and maintain coherence throughout your study.

Crafting a strong thesis statement and formulating a compelling research question are critical steps in the research process. These components provide direction, focus, and structure to your study, ensuring that your work remains relevant and impactful. By following the steps and tips outlined in this guide, you can develop a thesis statement and research question that effectively guide your research and contribute meaningful insights to your field.

Remember, the process of formulating a thesis statement and research question is iterative. Be prepared to refine and adjust as needed, and seek feedback from advisors and peers to strengthen your approach. With a clear and focused thesis statement and research question, you can embark on your research journey with confidence and clarity, ultimately producing a comprehensive and impactful study.

To further assist you in crafting a strong thesis statement and formulating a compelling research question, here are some additional resources that can provide valuable insights and tools:

Books and Guides:

"The Craft of Research" by Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams: This book offers practical advice on all aspects of research, from formulating a research question to presenting evidence.

"Surviving Your Dissertation: A Comprehensive Guide to Content and Process" by Kjell Erik Rudestam and Rae R. Newton : A thorough guide that covers both the content and process of writing a dissertation. It includes chapters on developing a research question, conducting a literature review, and choosing appropriate research methods.

"Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches" by John W. Creswell : Provides a comprehensive overview of various research methodologies and how to design a robust study.

Lined and Blank Notebooks: Available for purchase from Amazon, we offer a selection of lined and blank notebooks designed for students to capture all dissertation-related thoughts and research in one centralized place, ensuring that you can easily access and review your work as the project evolves.

The lined notebooks provide a structured format for detailed notetaking and organizing research questions systematically

The blank notebooks offer a free-form space ideal for sketching out ideas, diagrams, and unstructured notes.

These resources are designed to support you through the various stages of your research journey, from initial topic selection to the final presentation of your findings. Leveraging them can enhance the quality and impact of your work, helping you to produce a well-researched and compelling thesis.

As an Amazon Associate, I may earn from qualifying purchases.

how to write a thesis paper

The Ultimate Guide to Writing Your Dissertation Proposal

Choosing your dissertation topic: strategies for balancing interest and feasibility.

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Organizing Your Social Sciences Research Paper

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  • Purpose of Guide
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  • Independent and Dependent Variables
  • Glossary of Research Terms
  • Reading Research Effectively
  • Narrowing a Topic Idea
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  • Bibliography

Importance of Broadening the Research Topic

It is important to adopt a flexible approach when choosing a topic to investigate. The goal when writing any paper is to choose a research problem that is focused and time-limited. However, your starting point should not be so narrowly defined that you unnecessarily constrict your opportunity to investigate the topic thoroughly. A research problem that is too narrowly defined leads to any of the following problems :

  • You can't find enough information and what you do find is tangential or irrelevant.
  • You find information that is so specific that it can't lead to any significant conclusions.
  • Your sources cover so few ideas that you can't expand them into a significant paper.
  • The research problem is so case specific that it limits opportunities to generalize or apply the results to other contexts.
  • The significance of the research problem is limited to only a very small, unique population.

Ravitch, Sharon M. and Matthew Riggan. Reason and Rigor: How Conceptual Frameworks Guide Research . Los Angeles, CA: SAGE, 2017.

Strategies for Broadening the Research Topic

In general, an indication that a research problem is too narrowly defined is that you can't find any relevant or meaningful information about it. If this happens, don't immediately abandon your efforts to investigate the problem because it could very well be an excellent topic of study. A good way to begin is to look for parallels and opportunities for broader associations that apply to the initial research problem. A strategy for doing this is to ask yourself the basic six questions of who, what, where, when, how, and why.

Here is an example of how to apply the six questions strategy to broadening your topic. Let's use the research topic of how to investigate ways to improve trade relations between Peru and Bolivia as an example. Ask yourself:

  • Who? -- are there other countries involved in the relations between these two countries that might want to challenge or encourage this relationship? Are there particular individuals or special interest groups [e.g., politicians, union leaders, etc.] promoting trade relations or trying to inhibit it? [remember to ask either the individual who question, the collective who question, or the institutional who question].
  • What? -- what are the specific trading commodities you are examining? Are there commodities not currently traded between Peru and Bolivia that could be? What commodities are being traded but should be traded in greater volume? What barriers exist that may help or hinder the import-exports of specific commodities?
  • Where? -- where are examples of other bi-lateral trade agreements that could model the potential for closer trade relations between Peru and Bolivia? Where are the benefits most likely to be felt within each country? Note that the question of where can also relate to specific spatial and geographical issues, such as, are there any areas impeding transportation of goods in the region?
  • When? -- how long have these countries had or not had trade relations? How far into the future might a trade relationship last given other factors? The question of when can apply to either past issues or future areas of interest.
  • How? -- how might Peru and Bolivia forge these ties in relation to, for example, long-standing internal conflicts within each country? Note that the how question can also be framed as, "In what way might...." [e.g., In what way might improved trade relations lead to other forms of economic exchanges between the two countries?].
  • Why? -- what advantages can each country gain by pursuing active trade relations? Why might other countries be concerned about closer ties between these two countries? Asking why can illuminate the " So What? " question applied to your topic and, thus, provide a means of assessing significance.

Reflecting upon these six questions during your initial review of the literature can help you formulate ways to expand the parameters of your initial research problem, providing an opportunity to identify new avenues of investigation and centering your study around gaps in the literature when answers to questions cannot be found. Once you've identified additional directions in which to proceed with your topic, you can try narrowing it down again, if needed.

NOTE:   Do not determine on your own that a research problem is too narrowly defined . Always consult with a librarian before making this assumption because librarians are experts in finding information and interpreting it in relation to a research problem. As such, they can help guide you to undiscovered research or suggest ways to design a broader analysis of your research problem using resources you did not even know existed.

Booth, Wayne C. The Craft of Research . Fourth edition. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press, 2016; Coming Up With Your Topic. Institute for Writing Rhetoric. Dartmouth College; Getting Started With Your Research: A Self-Help Guide to Quality Information, Jean and Alexander Heard Library. Vanderbilt University; Strategies for Broadening a Topic. University Libraries. Information Skills Modules. Virginia Tech University.

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how to write a thesis paper

Research Paper Format: Your Ultimate Guide

Research Paper Format

In this article, our research proposal writing service experts will empower you to understand the critical role of formatting in academic writing. You'll explore various types of research papers and tailor your format to the specific demands of your project. Learn how to format a research paper in APA, MLA, ASA, and Chicago styles, and demystify the art of citation in each. Gain insights into crafting a well-structured, impactful paper, and join us as we unlock your research paper's true potential and elevate your academic writing skills to new heights!

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The Basics of Research Paper Formats

Before diving into the intricacies of different paper writing formats, it's essential to establish a clear understanding of what exactly a research paper format entails. In essence, it is a structured set of guidelines and rules that govern the layout, organization, and overall presentation of your scholarly work. It encompasses elements such as font styles, margins, headings, citations, and reference lists.

Why is adhering to a specific research article format so crucial? The answer lies in the very essence of academic writing. Research papers are the means through which scholars and students communicate their ideas, findings, and insights to the academic community and the world at large. Consistency in formatting is paramount because it ensures that your work is presented in a standardized, professional manner. Adhering to a specific format serves multiple purposes:

research paper format basics

  • Clarity and Professionalism: A consistent format enhances the clarity of your paper and presents it in a professional light. It allows readers to focus on the content rather than being distracted by inconsistent styling.
  • Communication: Standardized formatting conventions enable scholars from various disciplines and institutions to understand your research more easily. It's a universal language that transcends academic boundaries.
  • Credibility: Conforming to a recognized format demonstrates your commitment to the academic standards of your field. It establishes credibility and trust among your readers.

Formatting research papers effectively isn't just about aesthetics; it plays a pivotal role in making your research paper more readable and comprehensible. Here's how:

  • Logical Flow: A well-structured format with clear headings and subheadings helps your readers navigate through your paper with ease, following the logical flow of your argument or analysis.
  • Citations and References: Proper citation and referencing, integral parts of formatting, giving due credit to the sources you've used, and lending authority to your research.
  • Consistency: Consistent formatting, from margins to font size and citation style, fosters a sense of order and coherence, making it simpler for your audience to focus on the content.
  • Accessibility: An appropriate format ensures that your research paper is accessible to individuals with diverse reading preferences and needs. It accommodates those who skim, scan, or read in detail.

Meanwhile, you can always rely on our academic help with your ' write papers for me ' requests and pay for a research paper !

How the Choice of Format May Vary Based on the Type of Research Paper?

The type of paper you're working on plays a significant role in determining the most suitable college research paper format. For instance:

  • Argumentative Papers: These often follow formats that highlight the thesis statement, counterarguments, and supporting evidence. In APA or MLA formats, clear citations and references are key.
  • Analytical Papers: These may employ a variety of formats depending on the discipline, but clarity and logical flow are always crucial. APA or MLA can work well, depending on the subject.
  • Empirical Papers: APA format is commonly used for empirical research papers due to its focus on methodology, results, and statistics.
  • Literature Reviews: A literature review might follow APA, MLA, or Chicago styles, depending on the subject area. Consistent citation and referencing are essential.
  • Survey Research Papers: APA or ASA (American Sociological Association) formats are often used for survey research, emphasizing methodology and results.

How to Format a Research Paper in Different Citation Styles?

The art of crafting a research paper layout extends beyond structure and organization; it also encompasses the intricate details of citation styles. Each academic discipline has its preferred citation style, and mastering the nuances of these styles is essential for academic success. In this section, we'll provide you with the knowledge and tools to navigate the intricacies of APA, MLA, ASA, and Chicago formats. Whether you're working on research paper topics in psychology, literature, sociology, or history, understanding how to format your paper is the key to presenting your findings with precision and authority.

types of research paper

APA Research Paper Format

When it comes to academic writing, the American Psychological Association (APA) style is a formidable presence. Widely used in the fields of psychology, education, and the social sciences, mastering the APA research paper format is essential for researchers, scholars, and students. In this section, we'll delve into the core elements of APA formatting, offering insights into everything from title pages to reference lists. Whether you're embarking on a psychology research paper or exploring the intricacies of the social sciences, understanding the APA format is your key to presenting research with clarity and precision. And, should you ever need assistance in crafting a well-structured paper, you can always rely on our expertise and request, ' write my research paper for me'!

How to Cite a Research Paper in APA?

Citing sources in an APA research paper format is essential for acknowledging the work of others and maintaining the credibility of your own research. Let's explore the key aspects of APA citation with concise examples:

In-Text Citations

In APA, in-text citations include the author's last name and the publication year. They can be integrated into your sentence or enclosed in parentheses.

Author's Name in the Sentence:

  • Smith (2018) argued that...
  • According to Smith (2018),...

Author's Name in Parentheses:

  • This theory has been widely accepted (Smith, 2018).
  • The results were inconclusive (Jones & Lee, 2019).
  • When no author is available, use the first few words of the reference list entry and the year: ('Title of Article,' 2020).

Reference List

The reference list, located at the end of your paper, lists all the sources cited. Entries follow a specific format:

  • Author(s): Last name and initials or organization name.
  • Publication Year: Enclosed in parentheses.
  • Title of Work: Italicized with sentence case.
  • Source: Journal, book, or website.
  • DOI or URL: For online sources.
  • Smith, J. R. (2017). The Art of Research. American Psychological Association.

Journal Article:

  • Brown, M., & Davis, S. (2020). Experimental Findings in Neuroscience. Journal of Advanced Research, 32(5), 123-135.

Online Source:

  • Johnson, L. (2019). The Digital Age: A Comprehensive Overview. Retrieved from https://www.examplewebsite.com/digital-age

ASA Research Paper Format

The American Sociological Association (ASA) format serves as the standard in sociology and related disciplines, providing a structured framework for presenting research findings. Whether you're exploring social issues, demographics, or cultural phenomena, understanding the ASA research paper format is pivotal. In this section, we'll introduce you to the key elements of ASA formatting and guide you through the process of citing sources effectively.

How to Cite a Research Paper in ASA?

Citing sources in ASA format follows a specific set of guidelines designed to maintain consistency and clarity in sociological research. Let's delve into ASA citation with clear examples to ensure your research papers align with this discipline's requirements.

ASA in-text citations typically include the author's last name and the publication year, with variations based on whether the author is named in the text or included in parentheses.

  • Johnson (2019) argued that...
  • According to Johnson (2019),...
  • This theory has been widely accepted (Johnson 2019).
  • The results were inconclusive (Smith and Lee 2018).

The ASA reference list, located at the end of your paper, lists all the sources cited. Entries should include:

  • Author(s): Last name, first name.
  • Title of Work: Italicized in title case.
  • Smith, John. 2017. The Art of Research. American Sociological Association.
  • Brown, Mary, and Davis, Susan. 2020. 'Experimental Findings in Sociology.' Journal of Advanced Research 32(5): 123-135.
  • Johnson, Laura. 2019. 'The Digital Age: A Comprehensive Overview.' Retrieved from https://www.examplewebsite.com/digital-age

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MLA Format Research Paper

The Modern Language Association (MLA) style is widely used in the humanities, including literature, language studies, and the arts. Navigating the research paper format MLA is essential for scholars and students in these fields. In this section, we'll provide an overview of the key elements of MLA formatting, guiding you through the process of citing sources accurately.

How to Cite a Research Paper in MLA?

Learning how to write a research paper in MLA format adheres to specific rules to ensure the clarity and consistency of your research papers. Let's delve into MLA citation with illustrative examples:

MLA in-text citations typically include the author's last name and the page number in parentheses. The format can vary based on whether the author's name is included in the sentence or enclosed in parentheses.

  • Smith argued that 'the sky is blue' (25).
  • According to Smith, 'the sky is blue' (25).
  • This theory has been widely accepted (Johnson 42).
  • The results were inconclusive (Smith and Lee 56).

Works Cited Page

The Works Cited page, located at the end of your paper, provides a comprehensive list of all the sources cited. Entries follow a specific format:

  • Title of Work: Italicized with title case.
  • Page Numbers: For print sources.
  • URL: For online sources.
  • Smith, John. The Art of Research. American Literary Press, 2017.
  • Brown, Mary, and Susan Davis. 'Experimental Findings in Literature.' Journal of Advanced Research , vol. 32, no. 5, 2020, pp. 123-135.
  • Johnson, Laura. 'The Digital Age: A Comprehensive Overview.' www.examplewebsite.com/digital-age.

Chicago Style of Citing Research Paper

The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) is a versatile and widely recognized style guide used across various disciplines, including history, social sciences, and fine arts. Mastery of the Chicago research paper format is a valuable skill for researchers and students in these fields. In this section, we will explore the core elements of Chicago formatting and guide you through the process of accurately citing sources.

How to Cite a Research Paper in Chicago Style?

Chicago citation style offers flexibility, accommodating both notes and bibliography (NB) and author-date (AD) systems. Let's delve into Chicago citation with examples to ensure your research papers adhere to the requirements of your discipline.

In Chicago NB (Notes and Bibliography) format, in-text citations often appear as footnotes or endnotes, while Chicago AD (Author-Date) format employs parenthetical citations. The format can vary based on whether the author's name is included in the sentence or enclosed in parentheses.

Chicago NB Format:

  • Smith argued that 'the sky is blue.' ¹
  • According to Smith, 'the sky is blue.' ²

Chicago AD Format:

  • (Smith 2017, 25)
  • (Smith and Lee 2018, 56)

Bibliography (Chicago NB) or Reference List (Chicago AD)

The Bibliography (for NB) or Reference List (for AD) is located at the end of your paper and lists all the sources cited. Entries follow specific formats:

Book (Chicago NB):

Journal Article (Chicago AD):

  • Brown, Mary, and Susan Davis. 2020. 'Experimental Findings in History.' Journal of Advanced Research 32, no. 5: 123-135.

Online Source (Chicago NB):

In the world of academia, mastering different types of research paper formatting and the art of citation is your passport to success. Whether it's APA, MLA, ASA, or Chicago, each format has its nuances, and understanding them is crucial. With a well-structured outline, clarity in in-text citations, and a meticulously organized reference list, you're poised to navigate the complexities of research paper writing. As you embark on your academic journey, remember that precise formatting and citing not only uphold the integrity of your work work but also enhance your scholarly impact.

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Struggling with Writing a Great Thesis Statement? We Can Help You

To write a nice academic paper, you should be very persuasive. To convince readers that you are competent, you have to be proficient in the language used for communication. When writing your paper, you should have a very powerful introduction. A thesis statement is part of the introduction and basically tells the reader the information contained in your paper in brief. Basically, it lets the reader know your point of view right from the onset. If you are not sure about how to approach this task, we have experts who know the best way to write a thesis statement. The clients that we serve confirm this fact. They leave positive testimonials on our website, which is an indication that our services are satisfactory. You do not need to go to the unproven companies whose main intention is to make money as opposed to helping you out of your academic distress.

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Why Most Students Need Thesis Statement Help

A thesis statement should be able to convince the readers to go past the introductory part of your paper. Only students with strong written communication skills can persuade their readers. The learners with weak language skills find writing a persuasive thesis statement an uphill task. Unfortunately, human beings judge others based on the first impression. Regardless of how informative your content is, an unsatisfactory thesis statement is likely to discourage the readers from proceeding to the rest of the content. The effort that you have put to research may go to waste. Just reach out to us and give our experts the task. They can do the work and deliver more than you expect.

Sometimes Students have to handle huge workloads. You have that argumentative essay that you have to finish and submit in a few hours, and you still have to attend the normal classes in your school. Besides, you still have to study for exams and pass. All this work can overwhelm you. In fact, your creativity in making a thesis statement is hampered. In a bid to finish all your assignments, you write this part of your paper very fast. You overlook a lot of important information in the process. There is no harm in allowing our experts to help with that thesis statement as you concentrate on the tasks that are difficult to delegate such as studying for exams. When you hire us, you get a chance of boosting your grades from the papers and at the same time perform better in your exams since you can now focus on the content for exams without distractions from other tasks.

Submission deadlines are normally very strict. The instructors rarely adjust them even if the prevailing circumstances change drastically. As a student, you are expected to cope however hard it may seem for you. As you try to be on the safe side, you decide to do everything in a hurry including the thesis statement. When you do the work for the sake of finishing it, you are bound to make mistakes. From our company, you receive great thesis statements even when you need it within a short time.

How to Order a Paper from Us – An Easy Process and Benefits

If you need help on thesis statement or the whole paper, you can rest assured that our writers can deliver it. Moreover, our website is easy to use even for first-time visitors. In fact, you do not have to sign up for an account if you are a new client. Just place the order and receive your login information through your email address. It is very convenient for customers. When you need a paper, this is what you should do:

  • Fill the order form

There are specific details that you should include in the order form to make it easy for the experts to deliver exactly what you want. The details that you should include are the topic you want to be tackled; the academic level of your paper, the delivery timeframe and any other detail that you feel can be helpful. For instance, you can upload a document that you want to be modeled as we write yours.

  • Pay for the paper

The payment is made through the various payment options that are available on our website. The methods are secure, and your personal information cannot be accessed by fraudsters. What you pay depends on the academic level, pages and the deadline that you have provided for the paper to be availed to you.

  • Get a professional assigned

The expert to help write a thesis statement on your behalf should possess the proficiency to write on that specific subject and be comfortable with the academic level of the paper. If you wish to follow the progress of the paper, you can directly communicate with the writer through the message platform. Moreover, you can give clarifications of what you want to the writer.

  • Download the file with the assignment

At the time you specified, the assignment is delivered. You can now download it through your account. Request for corrections on the parts you feel need adjustments. What is more? The revisions are free.

Our Strong Points in the Industry

We have worked with our clients for many years and have learned how to provide papers that meet their expectations. The customers can get access to a myriad of benefits:

  • Several topics

At our company, we have specialists in all subject areas. Just bring your question, and let the experts tackle it.

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We charge what you can afford as a student. Our experts combine quality with affordability.

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We design your cover page for free. There are also attractive bonuses for loyal customers.

Contact Us for Help with Thesis Statement

Our writers can handle any of your tasks at your convenience. So do not hesitate to place that order.

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IMAGES

  1. 45 Perfect Thesis Statement Templates (+ Examples) ᐅ TemplateLab

    how to write a thesis paper

  2. 45 Perfect Thesis Statement Templates (+ Examples) ᐅ TemplateLab

    how to write a thesis paper

  3. 18 Thesis Outline Templates and Examples (Word

    how to write a thesis paper

  4. 45 Perfect Thesis Statement Templates (+ Examples) ᐅ TemplateLab

    how to write a thesis paper

  5. How to Write a Thesis Paper with Paperstime

    how to write a thesis paper

  6. How to Write a Thesis Paper with Paperstime

    how to write a thesis paper

VIDEO

  1. Thesis or Research paper writing for beginners

  2. How To Write Thesis Paper || কিভাবে থিসিস পেপার লিখতে হয়

  3. Part 2 : How and what to write

  4. How to write thesis chapter 1

  5. Thesis and research paper writing tips|How to write thesis and research paper/article @MajidAli2020

  6. How to Structure your Thesis

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    Learn how to write a clear and concise thesis statement for your essay or paper. Follow four simple steps: start with a question, write your initial answer, develop your answer, and refine your thesis statement.

  2. What Is a Thesis?

    Learn what a thesis is, how to structure it, and what to include in each chapter. Download a free template and see examples of different types of theses.

  3. What is a thesis

    Learn what a thesis is, how to write a strong thesis statement, and the different types of thesis statements. This guide also covers the structure, components, and tips for writing a thesis paper.

  4. Developing A Thesis

    Learn how to construct a clear, concise, and arguable thesis statement for your academic essay. Follow the steps to analyze your sources, anticipate counterarguments, and write a thesis that tells what you plan to argue and how you plan to argue.

  5. Thesis

    Learn how to write a thesis statement for an academic essay, based on analysis of evidence and argument. Find out how to make your thesis arguable, relevant, and within the scope of your assignment.

  6. Creating a Thesis Statement, Thesis Statement Tips

    Learn how to write a thesis statement for different kinds of papers: analytical, expository, and argumentative. Find out what a thesis statement is, how to make it specific, and how to place it in your paper.

  7. How to write a thesis statement + Examples

    Learn what a thesis statement is, how to write a good one, and see examples. A thesis statement is the main argument of your paper or thesis that answers a question and requires evidence.

  8. PDF Strategies for Essay Writing

    Harvard College Writing Center 8 Thesis Your thesis is the central claim in your essay—your main insight or idea about your source or topic. Your thesis should appear early in an academic essay, followed by a logically constructed argument that supports this central claim. A strong thesis is

  9. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    Your thesis should indicate the point of the discussion. If your assignment is to write a paper on kinship systems, using your own family as an example, you might come up with either of these two thesis statements: My family is an extended family. This is a weak thesis because it merely states an observation.

  10. Dissertation & Thesis Outline

    Dissertation & Thesis Outline | Example & Free Templates. Published on June 7, 2022 by Tegan George.Revised on November 21, 2023. A thesis or dissertation outline is one of the most critical early steps in your writing process.It helps you to lay out and organize your ideas and can provide you with a roadmap for deciding the specifics of your dissertation topic and showcasing its relevance to ...

  11. Academic Guides: Writing a Paper: Thesis Statements

    When drafting your thesis statement, avoid words like explore, investigate, learn, compile, summarize, and explain to describe the main purpose of your paper. These words imply a paper that summarizes or "reports," rather than synthesizing and analyzing. Instead of the terms above, try words like argue, critique, question, and interrogate.

  12. Developing a Thesis Statement

    Learn what a thesis statement is and how to write one for your paper. Follow the steps to identify a topic, inform yourself, focus, and derive a main point and a purpose statement.

  13. HOW TO WRITE A THESIS: Steps by step guide

    A strong thesis should be able to take a stand and not just taking a stand but should be able to justify the stand that is taken, so that the reader will be tempted to ask questions like how or why. The thesis should be arguable, contestable, focused, specific, and clear. Make your thesis clear, strong and easy to find.

  14. How To Write a Thesis Statement: Step-By-Step

    Learn how to write a successful thesis statement in Part 1 of our Essay Writing Guide. Read this 2022 update of our popular guide.

  15. PDF The Structure of an Academic Paper

    The thesis is generally the narrowest part and last sentence of the introduction, and conveys your position, the essence of your argument or idea. See our handout on Writing a Thesis Statement for more. The roadmap Not all academic papers include a roadmap, but many do. Usually following the thesis, a roadmap is a

  16. Crafting Your Thesis Statement: Formulating a Strong Research Question

    A thesis statement is a concise summary of the main point or claim of your research paper. It is typically one or two sentences long and presents your position on the topic you are researching. The thesis statement serves as the foundation for your entire paper, guiding your writing and keeping your arguments focused.

  17. How to Write a Thesis or Dissertation Introduction

    Overview of the structure. To help guide your reader, end your introduction with an outline of the structure of the thesis or dissertation to follow. Share a brief summary of each chapter, clearly showing how each contributes to your central aims. However, be careful to keep this overview concise: 1-2 sentences should be enough.

  18. How to Write a PhD Thesis: A Step-by-Step Guide for Success

    Time Management: With the help of a PhD thesis writing service, you can manage your time more effectively. Professionals can speed up the research, writing, and revision processes, allowing you to focus on other important academic or personal commitments. Reduced Stress: The process of writing a PhD thesis can be stressful. Having a ...

  19. PDF A Guide to Writing a Senior Thesis in Social Studies

    Writing a thesis is unlike any other undergraduate assignment that you've under-taken, and, to do it well, you'll need to commit a substantial amount of time towards its completion. While the time commitment will vary over the course of junior spring to senior spring, you should expect to allocate at least part of your summer towards work -

  20. Thesis

    Major papers presented as the final project for a master's degree are normally called thesis; and major papers presenting the student's research towards a doctoral degree are called theses or dissertations. ... To complete both bachelor's and master's degree, a student is required to write a thesis and to then defend the work publicly.

  21. Organizing Your Social Sciences Research Paper

    It is important to adopt a flexible approach when choosing a topic to investigate. The goal when writing any paper is to choose a research problem that is focused and time-limited. However, your starting point should not be so narrowly defined that you unnecessarily constrict your opportunity to investigate the topic thoroughly.

  22. PDF Thesis

    Harvard College Writing Center 1 Thesis Your thesis is the central claim in your essay—your main insight or idea about your source or topic. Your thesis should appear early in an academic essay, followed by a logically constructed argument that supports this central claim.

  23. How to Write a Thesis or Dissertation Conclusion

    Step 2: Summarize and reflect on your research. Step 3: Make future recommendations. Step 4: Emphasize your contributions to your field. Step 5: Wrap up your thesis or dissertation. Full conclusion example. Conclusion checklist. Other interesting articles. Frequently asked questions about conclusion sections.

  24. Research Paper Format: In-depth Guide with Tips

    Argumentative Research Papers: These papers aim to persuade the reader about a particular viewpoint or argument. They require a clear thesis statement, compelling evidence, and a logical structure. Analytical Research Papers: Analytical papers delve into a topic, dissecting it to understand its various components and nuances. They don't ...

  25. Do You Need the Best Thesis Statement? Get It from Us

    The expert to help write a thesis statement on your behalf should possess the proficiency to write on that specific subject and be comfortable with the academic level of the paper. If you wish to follow the progress of the paper, you can directly communicate with the writer through the message platform.

  26. How to Write a Research Paper

    Create a research paper outline. Write a first draft of the research paper. Write the introduction. Write a compelling body of text. Write the conclusion. The second draft. The revision process. Research paper checklist. Free lecture slides.